HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Harvard Computers
Edward Charles Pickering
Edward Charles Pickering
(director of the Harvard Observatory from 1877 to 1919) decided to hire women as skilled workers to process astronomical data
[...More...]

"Harvard Computers" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Stellar Classification
In astronomy, stellar classification is the classification of stars based on their spectral characteristics. Electromagnetic radiation from the star is analyzed by splitting it with a prism or diffraction grating into a spectrum exhibiting the rainbow of colors interspersed with spectral lines. Each line indicates a particular chemical element or molecule, with the line strength indicating the abundance of that element. The strengths of the different spectral lines vary mainly due to the temperature of the photosphere, although in some cases there are true abundance differences. The spectral class of a star is a short code primarily summarizing the ionization state, giving an objective measure of the photosphere's temperature. Most stars are currently classified under the Morgan-Keenan (MK) system using the letters O, B, A, F, G, K, and M, a sequence from the hottest (O type) to the coolest (M type)
[...More...]

"Stellar Classification" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Royal Astronomical Society
The Royal Astronomical Society
Royal Astronomical Society
(RAS) is a learned society that began as the Astronomical Society of London
London
in 1820 to support astronomical research (mainly carried on at the time by 'gentleman astronomers' rather than professionals). It became the Royal Astronomical Society in 1831 on receiving its Royal Charter
Royal Charter
from William IV. A Supplemental Charter in 1915 opened up the fellowship to women. It is the UK adhering organisation to the International Astronomical Union
International Astronomical Union
and a member of the Science Council, and encourages and promotes the study of astronomy, solar-system science, geophysics and closely related branches of science.[1] Meetings are held in Burlington House, in Piccadilly, London
London
and across the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK)
[...More...]

"Royal Astronomical Society" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Intrinsic Brightness
Astronomers use the term intrinsic brightness to refer to how bright a star would be without the effects of distance or absorption due to interstellar dust or gas. While a bright distant star's apparent brightness might be less than a nearby dim star, due to the inverse square law for brightness, astronomers can discuss its intrinsic brightness meaning how bright the stars would be at a common distance. A star's intrinsic brightness is measured by its absolute magnitude.This astronomy-related article is a stub
[...More...]

"Intrinsic Brightness" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Cepheid Variable
A Cepheid variable
Cepheid variable
(/ˈsɛfiːɪd, ˈsiːfiːɪd/) is a type of star that pulsates radially, varying in both diameter and temperature and producing changes in brightness with a well-defined stable period and amplitude. A strong direct relationship between a Cepheid variable's luminosity and pulsation period[1][2] established Cepheids as important indicators of cosmic benchmarks for scaling galactic and extragalactic distances.[3][4][5][6] This robust characteristic of classical Cepheids was discovered in 1908 by Henrietta Swan Leavitt
Henrietta Swan Leavitt
after studying thousands of variable stars in the Magellanic Clouds.[7] This discovery allows one to know the true luminosity of a Cepheid by simply observing its pulsation period
[...More...]

"Cepheid Variable" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Small Magellanic Cloud
The Small Magellanic Cloud
Small Magellanic Cloud
(SMC), or Nubecula Minor, is a dwarf galaxy near the Milky Way.[4] It is classified as a dwarf irregular galaxy. It has a diameter of about 7,000 light-years,[3] contains several hundred million stars,[5] and has a total mass of approximately 7 billion times the mass of the Sun.[6] The SMC contains a central bar structure and it is speculated that it was once a barred spiral galaxy that was disrupted by the Milky Way
Milky Way
to become somewhat irregular.[7] At a distance of about 200,000 light-years, it is one of the Milky Way's nearest intergalactic neighbors. It is also one of the most distant objects that can be seen with the naked eye. The SMC is mostly visible from the Southern Hemisphere
Southern Hemisphere
though it can be fully glimpsed from near the southern horizon from equatorial latitudes south of about 15° N
[...More...]

"Small Magellanic Cloud" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

W. W. Norton
W. W. Norton & Company is an American publishing company based in New York City. It has been owned wholly by its employees since the early 1960s. The company is known for its "Norton Anthologies" (particularly The Norton Anthology of English Literature) and its texts in the Norton Critical Editions series, the latter of which are frequently assigned in university literature courses.Contents1 History 2 Publishing 3 Series3.1 Norton Anthologies 3.2 Norton Critical Editions4 Notable authors 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The roots of the company date back to 1923, when William Warder Norton founded the firm with his wife Mary Norton, and became its first president.[1] In the 1960s, Mary Norton offered most of her stock to its leading editors and managers
[...More...]

"W. W. Norton" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Wellesley College
Coordinates: 42°17′43″N 71°18′24″W / 42.29528°N 71.30667°W / 42.29528; -71.30667Wellesley CollegeLatin: Collegium WellesleianumFormer namesWellesley Female SeminaryMotto Non Ministrari sed Ministrare (Latin)Motto in EnglishNot to be ministered unto, but to ministerType Private liberal arts college Women's collegeEstablished 1870 (chartered) 1875 (commenced classes)Endowment $1.97 billion (2017)[1]President Paula A
[...More...]

"Wellesley College" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Vassar College
Vassar College
Vassar College
(/ˈvæsər/ VASS-ər) is a private, coeducational, liberal arts college in the town of Poughkeepsie, New York, in the United States. Founded in 1861 by Matthew Vassar, it was the first degree-granting institution of higher education for women in the United States. It became coeducational in 1969, and now has a gender ratio at the national average. The school is one of the historic Seven Sisters, the first elite female colleges in the U.S., and has a historic relationship with Yale University, which suggested a merger with the college before coeducation at both institutions. The college offers B.A. degrees in more than 50 majors and features a flexible curriculum designed to promote a breadth of studies. Student groups at the college include theater and comedy organizations, a cappella groups, club sports teams, volunteer and service groups, and a circus troupe
[...More...]

"Vassar College" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Henry Draper Catalog
The Henry Draper
Henry Draper
Catalogue (HD) is an astronomical star catalogue published between 1918 and 1924, giving spectroscopic classifications for 225,300 stars; it was later expanded by the Henry Draper
Henry Draper
Extension (HDE), published between 1925 and 1936, which gave classifications for 46,850 more stars, and by the Henry Draper
Henry Draper
Extension Charts (HDEC), published from 1937 to 1949 in the form of charts, which gave classifications for 86,933 more stars
[...More...]

"Henry Draper Catalog" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

JHU Press
The Johns Hopkins University
Johns Hopkins University
Press (also referred to as JHU Press or JHUP) is the publishing division of Johns Hopkins
Johns Hopkins
University. It was founded in 1878 and is the oldest continuously running university press in the United States.[2] The Press publishes books, journals, and electronic databases. Considering all its units (books, journals, fulfillment, and electronic resources) it is a contender for America's largest university press. Its headquarters are in Charles Village, Baltimore.Contents1 Overview 2 Publications and divisions 3 References 4 External linksOverview[edit] Daniel Coit Gilman, the first president of the Johns Hopkins University, inaugurated the Press in 1878.[3] The Press began as the University's Publication Agency, publishing the American Journal of Mathematics in its first year and the American Chemical Journal in its second
[...More...]

"JHU Press" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Smithsonian.com
Smithsonian is the official journal published by the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
The first issue was published in 1970.[3]Contents1 History 2 Content 3 Smithsonian American Ingenuity Awards 4 Smithsonian.com Photo Contest 5 Contributors 6 Notes and references 7 External linksHistory[edit] The history of Smithsonian began when Edward K. Thompson, the retired editor of Life magazine, was asked by the then-Secretary of the Smithsonian, S. Dillon Ripley, to produce a magazine "about things in which the Smithsonian [Institution] is interested, might be interested or ought to be interested."[4] Thompson would later recall that his philosophy for the new magazine was that it "would stir curiosity in already receptive minds. It would deal with history as it is relevant to the present. It would present art, since true art is never dated, in the richest possible reproduction
[...More...]

"Smithsonian.com" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Harvard.edu
Harvard University is a private Ivy League research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Established in 1636 and named for clergyman John Harvard (its first benefactor), its history, influence, and wealth have made it one of the world's most prestigious universities.[8] Harvard is the United States' oldest institution of higher learning,[9] and the Harvard Corporation (formally, the President and Fellows of Harvard College) is its first chartered corporation. Although never formally affiliated with any denomination, the early College primarily trained Congregational and Unitarian clergy. Its curriculum and student body were gradually secularized during the 18th century, and by the 19th century, Harvard had emerged as the central cultural establishment among Boston elites.[10][11] Following the American Civil War, President Charles W
[...More...]

"Harvard.edu" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin
Cecilia Helena Payne-Gaposchkin (/peɪn/; May 10, 1900 – December 7, 1979) was a British–American astronomer and astrophysicist who, in 1925, proposed in her Ph.D.
Ph.D.
thesis an explanation for the composition of stars in terms of the relative abundances of hydrogen and helium.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Doctorate 3 Career 4 Influence on women scientists 5 Personal life 6 Bibliography 7 Honors 8 Quotations 9 See also 10 References 11 Further reading 12 External linksEarly life[edit] Cecilia Helena Payne was one of three children born in Wendover, England, to Emma Leonora Helena (née Pertz) and Edward John Payne, a London barrister, historian and accomplished musician
[...More...]

"Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
[...More...]

"Digital Object Identifier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.