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Hartebeest
The hartebeest (/ˈhɑːrtəˌbiːst/;[3] Alcelaphus
Alcelaphus
buselaphus), also known as kongoni, is an African antelope. Eight subspecies have been described, including two sometimes considered to be independent species. A large antelope, the hartebeest stands just over 1 m (3.3 ft) at the shoulder, and has a typical head-and-body length of 200 to 250 cm (79 to 98 in). The weight ranges from 100 to 200 kg (220 to 440 lb). It has a particularly elongated forehead and oddly shaped horns, short neck, and pointed ears. Its legs, which often have black markings, are unusually long. The coat is generally short and shiny. Coat colour varies by the subspecies, from the sandy brown of the western hartebeest to the chocolate brown of the Swayne's hartebeest. Both sexes of all subspecies have horns, with those of females being more slender. Horns can reach lengths of 45–70 cm (18–28 in)
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Kongoni (operating System)
Kongoni is a Linux distribution
Linux distribution
that used the free version of the Linux kernel
Linux kernel
as distributed by the Linux-libre
Linux-libre
project. Development of the Kongoni project is currently dormant.[1] Kongoni was a desktop oriented operating system with a strong belief in being free (as in freedom) and aimed to be easy to install, use and customize.[1] Kongoni did not ship with, include or offer the ability to install any software not approved by the Free Software
Free Software
Foundation. Kongoni is the Shona word for Gnu, the same animal the GNU
GNU
Project takes its name from
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Introduced Species
An introduced species (alien species, exotic species, non-indigenous species, or non-native species) is a species living outside its native distributional range, which has arrived there by human activity, either deliberate or accidental. Non-native species can have various effects on the local ecosystem. Introduced species
Introduced species
that become established and spread beyond the place of introduction are called invasive species. The impact of introduced species is highly variable. Some have a negative effect on a local ecosystem, while other introduced species may have no negative effect or only minor impact. Some species have been introduced intentionally to combat pests. They are called biocontrols and may be regarded as beneficial as an alternative to pesticides in agriculture for example
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Subspecies
In biological classification, the term subspecies refers to a unity of populations of a species living in a subdivision of the species’s global range and varies from other populations of the same species by morphological characteristics.[2][3] A subspecies cannot be recognized independently. A species is either recognized as having no subspecies at all or at least two, including any that are extinct. The term is abbreviated "subsp." or "ssp."; plural: "subspecies". In zoology, under the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature, the subspecies is the only taxonomic rank below that of species that can receive a name. In botany and mycology, under the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, other infraspecific ranks, such as variety, may be named
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Sexual Maturity
Sexual maturity is the capability of an organism to reproduce. It may be considered synonymous with adulthood,[1] but, in humans, puberty encompasses the process of sexual maturation and adulthood is based on cultural definitions.[1][2] Most multicellular organisms are unable to sexually reproduce at birth (or germination), and depending on the species, it may be days, weeks, or years until their bodies are able to do so. Also, certain cues may cause the organism to become sexually mature. They may be external, such as drought, or internal, such as percentage of body fat (such internal cues are not to be confused with hormones which directly produce sexual maturity). Sexual maturity is brought about by a maturing of the reproductive organs and the production of gametes. It may also be accompanied by a growth spurt or other physical changes which distinguish the immature organism from its adult form
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Gestation
Gestation is the carrying of an embryo or fetus inside female viviparous animals. It is typical for mammals, but also occurs for some non-mammals. Mammals during pregnancy can have one or more gestations at the same time (multiple gestations). The time interval of a gestation is called the gestation period. In human obstetrics, gestational age refers to the embryonic or fetal age plus two weeks
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Savanna
A savanna or savannah is a mixed woodland grassland ecosystem characterised by the trees being sufficiently widely spaced so that the canopy does not close. The open canopy allows sufficient light to reach the ground to support an unbroken herbaceous layer consisting primarily of grasses.[1][2][3] Savannas maintain an open canopy despite a high tree density.[4] It is often believed that savannas feature widely spaced, scattered trees. However, in many savannas, tree densities are higher and trees are more regularly spaced than in forests.[5][6][7][8] The South American savanna types cerrado sensu stricto and cerrado dense typically have densities of trees similar to or higher than that found in South American tropical forests,[5][7][8] with savanna ranging from 800–3300 trees per hectare (trees/ha) and adjacent forests with 800–2000 trees/ha
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Mount Kenya
Mount Kenya
Kenya
is the highest mountain in Kenya
Kenya
and the second-highest in Africa, after Kilimanjaro.[4] The highest peaks of the mountain are Batian (5,199 metres (17,057 ft)), Nelion (5,188 metres (17,021 ft)) and Point Lenana (4,985 metres (16,355 ft)). Mount Kenya
Kenya
is located in central Kenya, the heart of Kenya, about 16.5 kilometres (10.3 mi) south of the equator, around 150 kilometres (93 mi) north-northeast of the capital Nairobi.[4] Mount Kenya
Kenya
is the source of the name of the Republic of Kenya. Mount Kenya
Kenya
is a stratovolcano created approximately 3 million years after the opening of the East African rift.[5] Before glaciation, it was 7,000 m (23,000 ft) high. It was covered by an ice cap for thousands of years
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Extinction
In biology and ecology, extinction is the termination of an organism or of a group of organisms (taxon), normally a species. The moment of extinction is generally considered to be the death of the last individual of the species, although the capacity to breed and recover may have been lost before this point. Because a species' potential range may be very large, determining this moment is difficult, and is usually done retrospectively
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International Union For Conservation Of Nature
The International Union for Conservation of Nature
International Union for Conservation of Nature
(IUCN; officially International Union for Conservation of Nature
International Union for Conservation of Nature
and Natural Resources[2]) is an international organization working in the field of nature conservation and sustainable use of natural resources. It is involved in data gathering and analysis, research, field projects, advocacy, and education. IUCN's mission is to "influence, encourage and assist societies throughout the world to conserve nature and to ensure that any use of natural resources is equitable and ecologically sustainable". Over the past decades, IUCN has widened its focus beyond conservation ecology and now incorporates issues related to sustainable development in its projects. Unlike many other international environmental organisations, IUCN does not itself aim to mobilize the public in support of nature conservation
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Critically Endangered
A critically endangered (CR) species is one which has been categorized by the International Union for Conservation of Nature
International Union for Conservation of Nature
(IUCN) as facing an extremely high risk of extinction in the wild.[1] As of 2014, there are 2464 animal and 2104 plant species with this assessment, compared with 1998 levels of 854 and 909, respectively.[2] As the IUCN Red List
IUCN Red List
does not consider a species extinct until extensive, targeted surveys have been conducted, species which are possibly extinct are still listed as critically endangered
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Swaziland
Coordinates: 26°30′S 31°30′E / 26.500°S 31.500°E / -26.500; 31.500Kingdom of Swaziland Umbuso weSwatini (Swazi)FlagCoat of armsMotto:  "Siyinqaba" (Swati) "We are a fortress" "We are a mystery/riddle" "We hide ourselves away"Anthem:  Nkulunkulu Mnikati wetibusiso temaSwati Oh God, Bestower of the Blessings of the SwaziLocation of  Swaziland  (dark blue) – in Africa  (light blue & dark grey) – in the African Union  (light blue)Capital Mbabane
Mbabane
(executive)
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Martin Lichtenstein
Martin Hinrich Carl Lichtenstein (10 January 1780 – 2 September 1857) was a German physician, explorer, botanist and zoologist.Contents1 Biography 2 Legacy 3 Writings 4 Literature 5 ReferencesBiography[edit] Born in Hamburg, Lichtenstein was the son of Anton August Heinrich Lichtenstein. He studied medicine at Jena and Helmstedt. Between 1802 and 1806 he travelled in southern Africa, becoming the personal physician of the Governor of the Cape of Good Hope. In 1811 he published Reisen im südlichen Afrika : in den Jahren 1803, 1804, 1805, und 1806;[1] as a result, he was appointed professor of zoology at the University of Berlin
University of Berlin
in 1811, and appointed director of the Berlin
Berlin
Zoological Museum in 1813
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Zimbabwe
Coordinates: 20°S 30°E / 20°S 30°E / -20; 30Republic of ZimbabweFlagCoat of armsMotto: "Unity, Freedom, Work"[1]Anthem:  "Blessed be the land of Zimbabwe"[2]Location of  Zimbabwe  (dark blue) in the African Union  (light blue)Capital and largest city Harare 17°50′S 31°3′E / 17.833°S 31.050°E / -17.833; 31.050Official languages16 languages[3]Chewa Chibarwe English Kalanga "Koisan" (presumably Tsoa) Nambya Ndau Ndebele Shangani Shona "sign language" Sotho Tonga Tswana Venda XhosaEthnic groups (2012)99.4% Black African (over 80% Shona; Ndebele are largest minority) 0.2% White African 0.4% others, including Coloured
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Game Animal
Game or quarry is any animal hunted for sport or for food. The type and range of animals hunted for food varies in different parts of the world. In some countries, game is classified, including legal classification with respect to licences required, as either "small game" or "large game".Contents1 Description 2 By continent and region2.1 Africa2.1.1 South Africa2.2 Oceania2.2.1 Australia 2.2.2 New Zealand2.3 North America2.3.1 Canada
Canada
and the United States2.3.1.1 Reptiles and amphibians 2.3.1.2 Birds (predator) 2.3.1.3 Birds (galliforms) 2.3.1.4 Birds (waterfowl) 2.3.1.5 Birds (waders) 2.3.1.6 Ungulates 2.3.1.7 Carnivores 2.3.1.8 Rodents 2.3.1.9 Misc
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Afrikaans
Afrikaans
Afrikaans
(/ˌæfrɪˈkɑːns, ˌɑːfri-, -ˈkɑːnz/)[5][6] is a West Germanic language spoken in South Africa, Namibia
Namibia
and, to a lesser extent, Botswana
Botswana
and Zimbabwe. It evolved from the Dutch vernacular[7][8] of South Holland
South Holland
(Hollandic dialect)[9][10] spoken by the mainly Dutch settlers of what is now South Africa, where it gradually began to develop distinguishing characteristics in the course of the 18th century.[11] Hence, it is a daughter language of Dutch, and was previously referred to as "Cape Dutch" (a term also used to refer collectively to the early Cape settlers) or "kitchen Dutch" (a derogatory term used to refer to Afrikaans
Afrikaans
in its earlier days)
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