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Hart Wood
Hart Wood
Hart Wood
(1880–1957) was an American architect who flourished during the "Golden Age"[1] of Hawaiian architecture. He was one of the principal proponents of a distinctive "Hawaiian style" of architecture appropriate to the local environment and reflective of the cultural heritage of the islands. He was one of the three founders (in 1926) of the Honolulu
Honolulu
Chapter of the American Institute of Architects, and the only one of its fourteen charter members to be elected a Fellow of the AIA. He served as territorial architect during World War II.[2]Contents1 Early years 2 Hawaiʻi Years 3 Gallery 4 Notes 5 ReferencesEarly years[edit] Hart Wood
Hart Wood
was born December 26, 1880 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Hart's grandfather Samuel Wood, father Thomas Hart Benton Wood, and uncle Louis M. H. Wood were all in the building trades
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Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Philadelphia
Philadelphia
(/ˌfɪləˈdɛlfiə/) is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and the sixth-most populous city in the United States, with an estimated population of 1,567,872[7] and more than 6 million in the seventh-largest metropolitan statistical area, as of 2016[update].[5] Philadelphia
Philadelphia
is the economic and cultural anchor of the Delaware
Delaware
Valley, located along the lower Delaware
Delaware
and Schuylkill Rivers, within the Northeast megalopolis
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Louis Christian Mullgardt
Louis Christian Mullgardt (1866-1942) was an American architect associated with the First Bay Tradition.[1] He designed houses in Berkeley, Oakland and other cities; the Court of the Ages at the 1915 Panama–Pacific International Exposition; the San Francisco Juvenile Court and Detention Home; the Durant School in Oakland; and a major renovation of the former M. H. de Young Memorial Museum.[2] He made design proposals for multi-building complexes for downtown Honolulu in 1915 and for Yosemite Valley in 1916. He was hired in 1918 to design the Lou Henry and Herbert Hoover House at Stanford University but was dismissed after prematurely publicizing the assignment without the Hoovers' consent.[3] Mullgardt was a native of Missouri. His earlier years were spent in St. Louis, where he began the study of architecture. Subsequently, he continued his studies at Harvard University. Following this, he went to Chicago, where he began designing. In 1893, he entered private practice in St. Louis
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Frederick Law Olmsted
Frederick Law Olmsted
Frederick Law Olmsted
(April 26, 1822 – August 28, 1903) was an American landscape architect, journalist, social critic, and public administrator. He is popularly considered to be the father of American landscape architecture
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St. Francis Hotel
The Westin St. Francis
Westin St. Francis
is a historic luxury hotel located on Powell and Geary Streets on Union Square in San Francisco, California. The two twelve-story south wings of the hotel were built in 1904, and the double-width north wing was completed in 1913, initially as apartments for permanent guests.[5] The 32-story, 120 m (390 ft) tower to the rear completed in 1972 features exterior glass elevators that offer panoramic views of the bay and the square below, making the St. Francis one of the largest hotels in the city, with more than 1,200 rooms and suites.[6]Contents1 History1.1 1906 earthquake 1.2 Through the Jazz Age 1.3 Fatty Arbuckle
Fatty Arbuckle
scandal 1.4 1930s and World War II 1.5 1950s to the present 1.6 Labor relations2 The hotel today 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit]The St. Francis Hotel
Hotel
soon after its opening in 1904The St
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1906 San Francisco Earthquake
The 1906 San Francisco
San Francisco
earthquake struck the coast of Northern California at 5:12 a.m. on April 18 with an estimated moment magnitude of 7.9 and a maximum Mercalli intensity of XI (Extreme). High intensity shaking was felt from Eureka on the North Coast to the Salinas Valley, an agricultural region to the south of the San Francisco Bay Area. Devastating fires soon broke out in the city and lasted for several days. As a result, up to 3,000 people died and over 80% of the city of San Francisco
San Francisco
was destroyed. The events are remembered as one of the worst and deadliest earthquakes in the history of the United States
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Neoclassical Architecture
Neoclassical architecture
Neoclassical architecture
is an architectural style produced by the neoclassical movement that began in the mid-18th century. In its purest form, it is a style principally derived from the architecture of classical antiquity, the Vitruvian principles, and the work of the Italian architect Andrea Palladio.[1] In form, neoclassical architecture emphasizes the wall rather than chiaroscuro and maintains separate identities to each of its parts. The style is manifested both in its details as a reaction against the Rococo
Rococo
style of naturalistic ornament, and in its architectural formulae as an outgrowth of some classicising features of the Late Baroque
Baroque
architectural tradition
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Beaux-Arts Architecture
Beaux-Arts architecture
Beaux-Arts architecture
(/ˌboʊˈzɑːr/; French: [bozaʁ]) was the academic architectural style taught at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, particularly from the 1830s to the end of the 19th century. It drew upon the principles of French neoclassicism, but also incorporated Gothic, and Renaissance
Renaissance
elements, and used modern materials, such as iron and glass. It was an important style in France until the end of the 19th century
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Geary Theater
Coordinates: 37°47′13″N 122°24′37″W / 37.787017°N 122.410286°W / 37.787017; -122.410286 American Conservatory Theater
American Conservatory Theater
(A.C.T.)Formation 1965Type Theatre groupLocationSan FranciscoArtistic director(s)Carey PerloffWebsite www.act-sf.orgGeary TheaterU.S. National Register of Historic Places San Francisco
San Francisco
Designated Landmark #82(2017)Location 415 Geary Street San Francisco, CaliforniaBuilt 1910Architect Bliss and Faville (Walter D. Bliss & William B
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Oakland, California
Oakland is the largest city and the county seat of Alameda County, California, United States. A major West Coast port city, Oakland is the largest city in the East Bay region of the San Francisco Bay
San Francisco Bay
Area, the third largest city overall in the San Francisco Bay
San Francisco Bay
Area, the eighth most populated city in California, and the 45th largest city in the United States
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Bernard Maybeck
Bernard Ralph Maybeck (February 7, 1862 – October 3, 1957) was an American architect in the Arts and Crafts Movement
Arts and Crafts Movement
of the early 20th century. He was an instructor at University of California, Berkeley.[3] Most of his major buildings were in the San Francisco
San Francisco
Bay Area.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Maybeck was born in New York City, the son of a German immigrant and studied at the Ecole des Beaux Arts
Ecole des Beaux Arts
in Paris, France.[4] He moved to Berkeley, California, in 1892. He became an instructor of engineering drawing at University of California, Berkeley, and acted as a mentor for a number of other important California
California
architects, including Julia Morgan and William Wurster
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Berkeley, California
Berkeley (/ˈbɜːrkliː/ BURK-lee) is a city on the east shore of San Francisco Bay in northern Alameda County, California. It is named after the 18th-century Anglo-Irish
Anglo-Irish
bishop and philosopher George Berkeley. It borders the cities of Oakland
Oakland
and Emeryville to the south and the city of Albany and the unincorporated community of Kensington to the north. Its eastern border with Contra Costa County
Contra Costa County
generally follows the ridge of the Berkeley Hills. The 2010 census recorded a population of 112,580. Berkeley is home to the oldest campus in the University of California system, the University of California, Berkeley, and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, which is managed and operated by the University. It also has the Graduate Theological Union, one of the largest religious studies institutions in the world
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John Galen Howard
John Galen Howard
John Galen Howard
(May 8, 1864 in Chelmsford, Massachusetts
Chelmsford, Massachusetts
– July 18, 1931 in San Francisco, California) was an American architect who began his career in New York before moving to San Francisco, California. He was the principal architect at Howard, Cauldwell & Morgan and employed Julia Morgan
Julia Morgan
early in her architectural career. Howard was educated at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1882-1885) and the École des Beaux-Arts(1891-1893). He was an apprentice with H. H. Richardson
H. H

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Piedmont, California
Piedmont
Piedmont
is a small, mostly-residential, semi-suburban city located in Alameda County, California, United States. Piedmont
Piedmont
is completely surrounded by the city of Oakland. Its residential population was 10,667 at the 2010 census. The name comes after the region of Piedmont in Italy, and literally means foothill. Piedmont
Piedmont
was incorporated in 1907, and was developed significantly in the 1920s and 1930s
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Shepley, Rutan & Coolidge
Shepley, Rutan and Coolidge
Shepley, Rutan and Coolidge
was a successful architecture firm based in Boston, Massachusetts, operating between 1886 and 1915, with extensive commissions in monumental civic and collegiate architecture in the spirit and style of Henry Hobson Richardson.Contents1 History 2 Work 3 Gallery 4 Sources 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] The firm grew out of Richardson's architectural practice. After Richardson's death at age 47 in 1886, a trio consisting of George Foster Shepley (1860–1903), Charles Hercules Rutan (1851–1914), and Charles Allerton Coolidge (1858–1936) gained control of the firm and completed all of its nearly two dozen pending projects, including the John J. Glessner House
John J. Glessner House
in Chicago
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Sequoia Sempervirens
Sequoia sempervirens
Sequoia sempervirens
/sɪˈkɔɪ.ə sɛmpərˈvaɪrənz/[2] is the sole living species of the genus Sequoia in the cypress family Cupressaceae
Cupressaceae
(formerly treated in Taxodiaceae). Common names include coast redwood, coastal redwood[3] and California redwood.[4] It is an evergreen, long-lived, monoecious tree living 1,200–1,800 years or more.[5] This species includes the tallest living trees on Earth, reaching up to 379 feet (115.5 m) in height (without the roots) and up to 29.2 feet (8.9 m) in diameter at breast height (dbh). These trees are also among the oldest living things on Earth
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