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Haroli People
The Huli are an indigenous people who live in the Hela Province
Hela Province
of Papua New Guinea. They speak primarily Huli and Tok Pisin; many also speak some of the surrounding languages, and some also speak English. They are one of the largest cultural groups in Papua New Guinea, numbering over 250,000 people (based on the population of Hela of 249,449 at the time of the 2011 national census).[1]Contents1 History 2 Society 3 References 4 SourcesHistory[edit] There is every indication the Huli have lived in their region for many thousands of years and recount lengthy oral histories relating to individuals and their clans. They were extensive travellers (predominantly for trade) in both the highlands and lowlands surrounding their homeland, particularly to the south
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Huli Language
Huli is a Trans–New Guinea language spoken by the Huli people
Huli people
of the Southern Highlands province of Papua New Guinea. It features a pentadecimal (base-15) numeral system: ngui means 15, ngui ki means 15×2 = 30, and ngui ngui means 15×15 = 225.Contents1 Phonology1.1 Consonants 1.2 Vowels/Nasals2 References 3 External linksPhonology[edit] Consonants[edit]Bilabial Alveolar Retroflex Palatal Velar GlottalPlosive p b t dk gFricativeʝhNasal m nŋLateralɭTrillrApproximant wVowels/Nasals[edit]Front BackClose i ĩ u ũMid e ẽ o õOpenɑ ɑ̃[3] References[edit]^ Huli at Ethnologue
Ethnologue
(18th ed., 2015) ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Huli". Glottolog
Glottolog
3.0
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Angu People
The Angu
Angu
or Änga people, also called Kukukuku (pronounced "cookah-cookah") or Toulambi by neighbouring tribes, are a small and previously violent group speaking a number of related languages[1] and living mainly in the high, mountainous region of south-western Morobe, a province of Papua New Guinea. Even though they are a short people, often less than 5 foot, they were once feared for their violent raids on more peaceful villages living in lower valleys.[2] Despite the high altitude and cold climate of their homeland, the Änga only wore limited clothing, including grass skirts, with a piece similar to a sporran, and cloaks made from beaten bark, called mals.[2] They are also known to Westerners for practicing a sexual ritual involving pre-adolescent boys acting as courtesans for male tribal elders.[3][4] Men practice homosexuality until marriage (Emotions Revealed by Paul Ekman)
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Koteka Peoples
The Koteka
Koteka
of West Papua are seven major ethnicities of the highlands of West Papua with a common culture: the Lani, Mee, Amungme, Moni, Damal, Yali, and Nduga
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Korowai People
The Korowai, also called the Kolufo, are the people who live in southeastern West Papua in the Indonesian Province of Papua, close to the border with Papua New Guinea. They number about 3,000.[2] It is possible that the Korowai were unaware of the existence of any people besides themselves, before outsiders made contact with them in 1970.[3]Contents1 Language 2 Living 3 Economy 4 Kinship 5 Social life 6 Religious life 7 Contact with Westerners 8 Architecture 9 References 10 Bibliography 11 External linksLanguage[edit] The Korowai language belongs to the Awyu–Dumut family (southeastern Papua) and is part of the Trans–New Guinea
Trans–New Guinea
phylum
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Lani People
The Lani are an indigenous people in Western New Guinea, usually labelled 'Western Dani' by foreign missionaries, or grouped—inaccurately—with the Dani people
Dani people
who inhabit the Baliem Valley to the east.Contents1 Etymology 2 Culture 3 The population of Lani Tribe 4 See also 5 ReferencesEtymology[edit] Lani means "you go". This term is particularly clear in relation to the stories told among the Walak tribe (Western Lani). In this story, the Walak word lani means "you go". This term relates to the name of another Lani tribe called Loma. The Loma are those who live in Puncak Jaya Regency of the Central Highlands. They speak both Lani and Moni languages, and sometimes also speak Amung. According to this story, there was a consensus held in the Grand Valley to divide and spread the people around the highlands. The chief who ordered the separation and spreading ordered one group "Lani" (you go) to one group, and to the other "Loma" (there)
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Marind People
Marind or Marind-Anim are people living in South New Guinea.Contents1 Geography 2 Topography 3 Culture 4 See also 5 References5.1 Citations 5.2 Sources6 External links6.1 Text 6.2 ImageGeography[edit] The Marind- anim live in Papua province of Indonesia. They occupy a vast territory, which is situated on either side of the Bian, from about 20 miles to the east of Merauke
Merauke
up the mouth of the Moeli in the west (between Frederik Hendrik Island and the mainland, east of Yos Sudarso Island, mainly west of Maro River (a small area goes beyond Maro at its lower part, including Merauke).[2]A map showing New Guinea
New Guinea
language groups. The Marind-speaking area is highlighted in red.Topography[edit] the territory of the Marind tribe consist of a low-lying, deposited coastal area. This area is for the most part flooded in the wet season
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Mek People
The Mek are a Papuan people
Papuan people
of Papua, Western New Guinea.[1] A television series on The Discovery Channel
The Discovery Channel
titled Living with the Mek was aired in 2008.[2] References[edit]^ Pamela J. Stewart & Andrew Strathern (2005). Expressive Genres and Historical Change: Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, and Taiwan. Ashgate
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Moni People
The Moni (also known as the Migani, the Megani, the Djonggunu, or the Jonggunu) are an indigenous people in the Indonesian Paniai regency (kabupaten) of the Papua province (formerly Central Irian Jaya) of West Papua (western part of the island of New Guinea). They speak the Moni language. They revere a large black and white whistling tree kangaroo called a bondegzeu as an ancestor. The bondegzeu was unknown to the scientific community until the zoologist Tim Flannery
Tim Flannery
described it in 1995.[2] References[edit]^ "Moni in Indonesia". Joshua Project. Retrieved 2014-09-18.  ^ David Wallechinsky; Amy Wallace; Ira Basen; Jane Farrow (2005). The book of lists: the original compendium of curious information. Alfred A. Knopf Canada. p. 154
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Sawi People
The Sawi or Sawuy are a tribal people of Western New Guinea, Indonesia. They were known to be cannibalistic[2] headhunters as recently as the 1950s. Since then, many of the tribe have converted to Christianity
Christianity
and the world's largest circular building made strictly from un-milled poles was constructed in 1972 as a Christian meeting place by the Sawi.[3] Christian missionary Don Richardson who lived among the Sawi wrote a book about the experience called Peace Child. References[edit]^ "Sawuy in Indonesia". Joshua Project. Retrieved 2014-09-18.  ^ Tucker (1983), p. 476 ^ Tucker (1983), p. 478Further reading[edit]Peace Child (1974) ISBN 1-57658-289-2 Tucker, Ruth (1983). From Jerusalem to Irian Jaya: A Biographical History of Christian Missions
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Wolani People
The Wolani or Wodani are a people in the Indonesian Paniai regency (kabupaten) of the Papua province (formerly Central Irian Jaya) of West Papua (western part of the island of New Guinea). Numbering about 5000 in 1992, they are farmers who live in the central highlands northeast of Lake Paniai, along the Kemandoga and Mbiyandogo rivers. Many Wolani converted to Christianity
Christianity
but, like elsewhere in Indonesia, they retain their traditional religion. They speak Wolani, which is affiliated with the western branch of the Trans–New Guinea languages,[2] similar to the nearby Ekari and Moni languages. It is not clear if the Wolani are a subgroup of the Lani
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Yali People
Yali are major tribal group in Papua, Indonesia, and live to the east of the Baliem Valley
Baliem Valley
in the Papuan highlands. The Dani word for "lands of the east" is "yali", from where the Yali took it, without it being a self-identification for their tribe.[1][2] The settlement territory of the Yali lies between the rivers Ubahak to the East and Sibi, Yahulie and Podeng to the West. Their major towns are Angguruk and Kosarek, which are isolated by challenging geography. The major access to their territory is by air. The villages are only accessible by walking for several hours. Their territory is known collectively as Yalimo.[2] To the West live the Dani, to the Northwest, partially in the mountains, the Lani. To the East and South are the territories of the Eipo and Mek. Accounts of the population size vary according to the source
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Abelam People
The Abelam are a people who live in the East Sepik
East Sepik
province of Papua New Guinea. They are a farming society in which giant yams play a significant role. They live in the Prince Alexander mountains near the north coast of the island. Their language belongs to the Sepik family. Farming and hunting[edit] The Abelam live in the tropical rain forest and clear ground by burning. Their main food crops are yams, taro, bananas, and sweet potatoes. They supplement this with food gathered from the rain forest as well as pigs and chickens raised domestically. They also hunt small marsupials and cassowaries. Yams[edit] Yam growing forms a large part of Abelam society. The growing of large yams (they can be as large as 80-90 inches (2.3 m) long) determines the status of individuals as well as the whole village
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Baining People
The Baining people
Baining people
are among the earliest and original inhabitants of the Gazelle Peninsula
Gazelle Peninsula
of East New Britain, Papua New Guinea. They currently inhabit the Baining Mountains
Baining Mountains
into where they are thought to have been driven by the Tolai tribes who migrated to the coastal areas in comparatively recent times. Another factor that might have influenced their migration inland was major volcanic activity that took place over centuries. (As recently as 1994, the nearby town of Rabaul
Rabaul
was almost completely destroyed by two volcanoes, Tavurvur
Tavurvur
and Vulcan)A Fire Dancer of the Baining
Baining
peopleThe Baining
Baining
tribes get their name from the Baining Mountains
Baining Mountains
which they inhabit
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Fayu People
The Fayu are an ethnic group that live in an area of swampland in Papua, Indonesia. When first contacted by westerners they numbered about 400; a number reduced from about 2000 due to violence within the group. The Fayu generally live in single family groups with gatherings of several such groups once or twice a year to exchange brides. Two books have been written about living among them. The first is by Sabine Kuegler[2] who spent most of her childhood growing up with them. The second is Jared Diamond's Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies[3] where the group is used as an example of a band type society. The Fayu are often described in books written about them as Stone Age people, cannibalistic, brutal fighters, backward, and as a people who can only count up to three.[4] Today, the Fayu people number up to 1,470; the majority of them are Christians.[1] References[edit]^ a b http://joshuaproject.net/people_groups/11193/ID ^ Sabine Kuegler (2007)
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Baruya People
The Baruya are a tribe in the highlands of Papua New Guinea. They have been studied since 1967 by anthropologist Maurice Godelier. Bibliography[edit]This article includes a list of references, related reading or external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks inline citations. Please help to improve this article by introducing more precise citations
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