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Harney Basin
The Harney Basin
Harney Basin
is an endorheic basin in southeastern Oregon
Oregon
in the United States
United States
at the northwestern corner of the Great Basin. One of the least populated areas of the contiguous United States, it is located largely in northern Harney County, bounded on the north and east by the Columbia Plateau—within which it is contained, physiographically speaking—and on the south and west by a volcanic plain. The basin encompasses an area of 1,490 square miles (3,859 km2) in the watershed of Malheur Lake
Malheur Lake
and Harney Lake. Malheur Lake
Malheur Lake
is a freshwater lake, while Harney Lake
Harney Lake
is saline-alkaline.[3] The basin is bounded on the north by the southern end of the Blue Mountains
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United States Physiographic Region
This list of physiographic regions of the contiguous United States identifies the 8 regions, 25 provinces, and 85 sections.[1] The system dates to Nevin Fenneman's paper Physiographic Subdivision of the United States, published in 1917.[2] Fenneman expanded and presented his system more fully in two books, Physiography of western United States (1931),[3] and Physiography of eastern United States (1938).[4] In these works Fenneman described 25 provinces and 85 sections of the United States physiography.[5] Physiographic divisions[edit]Region Province SectionI. Laurentian Upland 1. Superior UplandII. Atlantic Plain 2. Continental Shelf
Continental Shelf
(not on map)3. Coastal Plain 3a. Embayed section3b. Sea Island section3c. Floridian section3d. East Gulf Coastal Plain3e. Mississippi Alluvial Plain3f. West Gulf Coastal PlainIII. Appalachian Highlands 4. Piedmont 4a. Piedmont Upland4b. Piedmont Lowlands5. Blue Ridge province 5a
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Lava
Lava
Lava
is molten rock generated by geothermal energy and expelled through fractures in planetary crust or in an eruption, usually at temperatures from 700 to 1,200 °C (1,292 to 2,192 °F). The resulting structures after solidification and cooling are also sometimes described as lava. The molten rock is formed in the interior of some planets, including Earth, and some of their satellites, though such material located below the crust is referred to by other terms. A lava flow is a moving outpouring of lava created during a non-explosive effusive eruption. When it has stopped moving, lava solidifies to form igneous rock. The term lava flow is commonly shortened to lava
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Sand Dune
In physical geography, a dune is a hill of loose sand built by aeolian processes (wind) or the flow of water.[1] Dunes occur in different shapes and sizes, formed by interaction with the flow of air or water. Most kinds of dunes are longer on the stoss (upflow) side, where the sand is pushed up the dune, and have a shorter "slip face" in the lee side. The valley or trough between dunes is called a slack. A "dune field" or erg is an area covered by extensive dunes. Dunes occur in some deserts and along some coasts. Some coastal areas have one or more sets of dunes running parallel to the shoreline directly inland from the beach. In most cases, the dunes are important in protecting the land against potential ravages by storm waves from the sea. Although the most widely distributed dunes are those associated with coastal regions, the largest complexes of dunes are found inland in dry regions and associated with ancient lake or sea beds
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Basin And Range Province
The Basin and Range Province
Basin and Range Province
is a vast physiographic region covering much of the inland Western United States
Western United States
and northwestern Mexico. It is defined by unique basin and range topography, characterized by abrupt changes in elevation, alternating between narrow faulted mountain chains and flat arid valleys or basins. The physiography of the province is the result of tectonic extension that began around 17 million years ago in the early Miocene
Miocene
epoch. The numerous ranges within the province in the United States are collectively referred to as the " Great Basin
Great Basin
Ranges", although many are not actually in the Great Basin. Major ranges include the Snake Range, the Panamint Range, the White Mountains, the Sandia Mountains, and the Tetons
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Habitat
In ecology, a habitat is the kind of natural environment in which a particular organism species lives. It is characterized by both physical and biological features. A species' habitat is those places where it can find food, shelter, protection and mates for reproduction. The physical factors are for example soil, moisture, range of temperature, and light intensity as well as biotic factors such as the availability of food and the presence or absence of predators. Every organism has certain habitat needs for the conditions in which it will thrive, but some are tolerant of wide variations while others are very specific in their requirements
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Bird
Birds (Aves) are a group of endothermic vertebrates, characterised by feathers, toothless beaked jaws, the laying of hard-shelled eggs, a high metabolic rate, a four-chambered heart, and a strong yet lightweight skeleton. Birds live worldwide and range in size from the 5 cm (2 in) bee hummingbird to the 2.75 m (9 ft) ostrich. They rank as the world’s most numerically-successful class of tetrapods, with approximately ten thousand living species, more than half of these being passerines, sometimes known as perching birds. Birds have wings which are more or less developed depending on the species; the only known groups without wings are the extinct moa and elephant birds. Wings, which evolved from forelimbs, gave birds the ability to fly, although further evolution has led to the loss of flight in flightless birds, including ratites, penguins, and diverse endemic island species of birds
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Duck
see text Duck
Duck
is the common name for a large number of species in the waterfowl family Anatidae, which also includes swans and geese. Ducks are divided among several subfamilies in the family Anatidae; they do not represent a monophyletic group (the group of all descendants of a single common ancestral species) but a form taxon, since swans and geese are not considered ducks
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2010 United States Census
The 2010 United States
United States
Census (commonly referred to as the 2010 Census) is the twenty-third and most recent United States
United States
national census. National Census Day, the reference day used for the census, was April 1, 2010.[1] The census was taken via mail-in citizen self-reporting, with enumerators serving to spot-check randomly selected neighborhoods and communities. As part of a drive to increase the count's accuracy, 635,000 temporary enumerators were hired.[2][3] The population of the United States
United States
was counted as 308,745,538,[4] a 9.7% increase from the 2000 Census.Contents1 Introduction 2 Major changes 3 Cost 4 Technology 5 Marketing and undercounts 6 Reapportionment 7 Controversies7.1 Clemons v
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Irrigation
Irrigation
Irrigation
is the application of controlled amounts of water to plants at needed intervals. Irrigation
Irrigation
helps grow agricultural crops, maintain landscapes, and revegetate disturbed soils in dry areas and during periods of less than average rainfall. Irrigation
Irrigation
also has other uses in crop production, including frost protection,[1] suppressing weed growth in grain fields[2] and preventing soil consolidation.[3] In contrast, agriculture that relies only on direct rainfall is referred to as rain-fed or dry land farming. Irrigation
Irrigation
systems are also used for cooling livestock, dust suppression, disposal of sewage, and in mining
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List Of Great Basin Watersheds
The Great Basin is the largest region of contiguous endorheic drainage basins in North America, and is encompassed by the Great Basin Divide. This is a list of the drainage basins in the Great Basin that are over 500 sq mi (1,300 km2), listed by the state containing most of the basin.Contents1 Utah 2 Nevada 3 Oregon 4 California 5 Mexico 6 References 7 See alsoUtah[edit]Great Salt Lake (Idaho, Utah, Wyoming) 19,162 sq mi (49,630 km2) [1]Bear River (Idaho, Utah, Wyoming) 7,561 sq mi (19,580 km2) [2]Malad River (Idaho, Utah) 768 sq mi (1,990 km2) [3] Little Bear River (Idaho, Utah) 884 sq mi (2,290 km2) [4] Bear Lake (Idaho, Utah) 605 sq mi (1,570 km2) [5]Weber River (Utah, Wyoming) 2,093 sq mi (5,420 km2) [6] Jordan River (Utah) 3,551 sq mi (9,200 km2) [7]Utah Lake (Utah) 2,536 sq mi (6,570 km2) [8]
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Drainage Divide
A drainage divide, water divide, divide, ridgeline,[1] watershed, or water parting is the line that separates neighbouring drainage basins. On rugged land, the divide lies along topographical ridges, and may be in the form of a single range of hills or mountains, known as a dividing range
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Diamond Craters
Diamond Craters is a monogenetic volcanic field in southeastern Oregon, about 40 miles (64 km) southeast of the city of Burns. It consists of a 27-square-mile (70 km2) area of basaltic lava flows, cinder cones, and maars
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Archaeological
Archaeology, or archeology,[1] is the study of human activity through the recovery and analysis of material culture. The archaeological record consists of artifacts, architecture, biofacts or ecofacts, and cultural landscapes. Archaeology
Archaeology
can be considered both a social science and a branch of the humanities.[2][3] In North America, archaeology is considered a sub-field of anthropology,[4] while in Europe
Europe
archaeology is often viewed as either a discipline in its own right or a sub-field of other disciplines. Archaeologists study human prehistory and history, from the development of the first stone tools at Lomekwi
Lomekwi
in East Africa
Africa
3.3 million years ago up until recent decades. Archaeology
Archaeology
as a field is distinct from the discipline of palaeontology, the study of fossil remains
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Pleistocene
The Pleistocene
Pleistocene
( /ˈplaɪstəˌsiːn, -toʊ-/,[2] often colloquially referred to as the Ice Age) is the geological epoch which lasted from about 2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago, spanning the world's most recent period of repeated glaciations
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Chiselmouth
The chiselmouth (Acrocheilus alutaceus) is an unusual cyprinid fish of western North America. It is named for the sharp hard plate on its lower jaw, which is used to scrape rocks for algae. It is the sole member of the monotypic genus Acrocheilus and is a close relative of the Gila western chubs.[2] The chiselmouth's body plan generally follows the standard cyprinid form, generally elongated and slightly compressed. The snout is very blunt, with the lower jaw's plate (which consists of cornified epithelium) jutting out slightly. Coloration is rather drab, dark brown above and lighter lower down. Many individuals also have a pattern of black dots, and younger fish may have a dark area at the base of the tail. The single dorsal fin has 10 soft rays, while the anal fin and well-developed pelvic fins each have 9-10 rays. Chiselmouths can reach a length of 30 cm (12 in). Young fish feed on surface insects
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