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Harla
The Harla, also known as Harla Koombe, Harala and Arla,[1] were an ethnic group that inhabited Ethiopia
Ethiopia
and Somalia. They spoke the now extinct Harla language, which belonged to either the Cushitic[2] or Semitic branches of the Afroasiatic family.[3][4] There are existing books like that called "Kitaab al-Faraa'id" meaning "The Book of Obligations" in old Harari written roughly 500 years ago; literature when Hararis were referred to as "Harla" at that time as attested to in the book "Conquest of Abyssinia." They are believed to be ancestors of the Harari people.[5]Contents1 History 2 Religion 3 Notable Harlans 4 See also 5 References5.1 Works citedHistory[edit] The Harla are credited by the present-day inhabitants of Hararghe (province of Ethiopia) with having constructed various historical sites found in the province
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Islam
Islam
Islam
(/ˈɪslɑːm/)[note 1] is an Abrahamic monotheistic religion teaching that there is only one God
God
(Allah)[1] and that Muhammad
Muhammad
is the messenger of God.[2][3] It is the world's second-largest religion[4] and the fastest-growing major religion in the world,[5][6][7] with over 1.8 billion followers or 24.1% of the global population,[8] known as Muslims.[9] Muslims make up a majority of the population in 50 countries.[4] Islam
Islam
teaches that God
God
is merciful, all-powerful, unique[10] and has guided mankind through prophets, revealed scriptures and natural signs.[3][11] The primary scriptures of Islam
Islam
are the Quran, viewed by Muslims as the verbatim word of God, and the teachings and normative example (called the sunnah, composed of accounts called hadith) of Muhammad
Muhammad
(c
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Afar People
The Afar (Afar: Qafár), also known as the Danakil, Adali and Odali, are an ethnic group inhabiting the Horn of Africa. They primarily live in the Afar Region
Afar Region
of Ethiopia
Ethiopia
and in northern Djibouti, although some also inhabit the southern point of Eritrea
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The Great Oromo Migrations
The Great Oromo migrations, also known as the Oromo migrations, were a series of expansions in the 16th and the 17th centuries by the Oromo people from southern Ethiopia, namely the contemporary Borana and Guji zones, into more northerly regions of Ethiopia. The expansion had a profound impact on subsequent historical events occurring in Ethiopia. Contents1 Sources 2 Early migrations2.1 Mélbah (1522–1530) and Mudena (1530–1538) 2.2 Kilolé (1538–1546)3 Bifolé (1546–1554) 4 Settlement4.1 Meslé (1554–1562) 4.2 Harmufa (1562–1570) and Robalé (1570–1578) 4.3 Adal period (1562–1579)5 Reprisals under Sarsa Dengel5.1 Birmajé (1578–1586) 5.2 Mul'eta (1586–1594)6 17th century6.1 Ya'qob 6.2 Ajuran Empire7 See also 8 Citations 9 References 10 Further readingSources[edit] Because the Oromo did not keep a written record of the migrations, this article must refer to Ethiopia, Portuguese, and Arabic sources for the reasons behind the migrations
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Tanzania
Coordinates: 6°18′25″S 34°51′14″E / 6.307°S 34.854°E / -6.307; 34.854United Republic
Republic
of Tanzania Jamhuri ya Muungano wa Tanzania  (Swahili)FlagCoat of armsMotto: "Uhuru na Umoja" (Swahili) "Freedom and Unity"Anthem: "Mungu ibariki Afrika" (English: "God Bless Africa")Capital Dodoma
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Zeila
Zeila
Zeila
(Somali: Saylac, Arabic: زيلع‎), also known as Zaila or Zeyla, is a port city in the northwestern Awdal
Awdal
region of Somaliland.[1] In the Middle Ages, the Jewish traveller Benjamin of Tudela
Benjamin of Tudela
identified Zeila
Zeila
(or Zawilah) with the Biblical location of Havilah.[2] Most modern scholars identify it with the site of Avalites mentioned in the 1st-century Greco-Roman travelogue the Periplus of the Erythraean Sea and in Ptolemy, although this is not undisputed.[3][4] The town evolved into an early Islamic center with the arrival of Muslims shortly after the hegira
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Mahfuz
Mahfuz (or Mohammed) (Arabic: محفوظ‎, Harari: ማሕፉዝ) (died July 1517) was a Harari[1] Emir
Emir
of the city of Harar, and later a Governor of Zeila
Zeila
in the Adal Sultanate.[2]Contents1 Life and reign 2 Legacy 3 See also 4 Notes and referencesLife and reign[edit] Mahfuz led raids into the eastern provinces of Abyssinia for a number of years. He selected the season of Lent
Lent
for his attacks, when the defenders were weakened by their fasts
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Adal Sultanate
The Adal Sultanate, or Kingdom of Adal (alt. spelling Adel Sultanate), was a Muslim
Muslim
Sultanate
Sultanate
located in the Horn of Africa. It was founded by Sabr ad-Din II after the fall of the Sultanate
Sultanate
of Ifat.[4] The kingdom flourished from around 1415 to 1577.[5] The sultanate and state were established by the local inhabitants of Zeila.[6][7][8] At its height, the polity controlled most of the territory in the Horn region immediately east of the Ethiopian Empire
Ethiopian Empire
(Abyssinia)
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Richard Pankhurst (academic)
Pankhurst is a surname, and may refer to: Members of a prominent family of suffragettes: Emmeline Pankhurst
Emmeline Pankhurst
(1858–1928), one of the founders of the British suffragette movement Richard Pankhurst (1834–1898), husband of Emmeline and noted member of the Independent Labour Party Christabel Pankhurst
Christabel Pankhurst
(1880–1958), a daughter of Emmeline and a fellow suffragette Adela Pankhurst
Adela Pankhurst
(1886–1961), another daughter, an Australian suffragette Sylvia Pankhurst
Sylvia Pankhurst
(1882–1960), a daughter who involved herself more with communism Richard K.P. Pankhurst (1927–2017), son of Sylvia and noted Ethiopian scholar Alula Pankhurst, son of Richard K.P
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List Of Ethnic Groups In Ethiopia
This is a list of ethnic groups in Ethiopia
Ethiopia
that are officially recognized by the government. It is a list taken from the 2007 Ethiopian National Census:[1] Population size and percentage of Ethiopia's total population according to the 1994 and 2007 censuses follows each entry. Ethiopia's population is highly diverse, containing over 80 different ethnic groups. Most people in Ethiopia
Ethiopia
speak Afro-Asiatic languages, mainly of the Cushitic and Semitic branches. The former includes the Oromo and Somali, and the latter includes the Amhara and Tigray. Together these four groups make up three-quarters of the population. The country also has Omotic ethnic minorities who speak Afro-Asiatic languages of the Omotic branch. They inhabit the southern regions of the country, particularly the Southern Nations, Nationalities and Peoples' Region
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Agaw People
The Agaw (Ge'ez: አገው Agaw; modern Agew) are an ethnic group inhabiting Ethiopia
Ethiopia
and neighboring Eritrea. They speak Agaw languages, which belong to the Cushitic branch of the Afroasiatic language family.Contents1 History 2 Language 3 Subgroups 4 Notable Agaw people 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit]15th century icon of Gebre Mesqel Lalibela, the 12th century Zagwe dynasty King.The Agaw are perhaps first mentioned in the third-century Monumentum Adulitanum, an Aksumite inscription recorded by Cosmas Indicopleustes in the sixth century
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Sarsa Dengel
Sarsa Dengel (Ge'ez ሠረጸ ድንግል śarṣa dingil, Amh. serṣe dingil "Sprout of the Virgin", 1550 – 4 October 1597) was nəgusä nägäst (throne name Malak Sagad I, Ge'ez መልአክ ሰገድ mal'ak sagad, Amh. mel'āk seged, "to whom the angel bows") (1563–1597) of Ethiopia, and a member of the Solomonic dynasty. Biography[edit] The son of Emperor Menas and Empress Admas Mogasa, Sarsa Dengel spent his reign in constant campaigning, repelling Ottoman advances inland from the Red Sea
Red Sea
and Oromo advances from the south. He was elected king by the Shewan commanders of the army and the Dowager Empress. Upon his coming of age Bahr negus
Bahr negus
Yeshaq, who had rebelled against his father, presented himself to Sarsa Dengel and made peace
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Daasanach People
The Daasanach (also known as the Marille or Geleba) are an ethnic group inhabiting parts of Ethiopia, Kenya
Kenya
and Sudan. Their main homeland is in the Debub Omo Zone
Debub Omo Zone
of the Southern Nations, Nationalities, and People's Region, adjacent to Lake Turkana. According to the 2007 national census, they number 48,067 people (or 0.07% of the total population of Ethiopia), of whom 1,481 are urban dwellers.[1]A Daasanach manThere are a number of variant spellings of Daasanach, including Dasenach and Dassanech (the latter used in an episode about them in the TV series Tribe). Daasanach is the primary name given in the Ethnologue language entry.[2] The Daasanach are also called Marille especially by their neighbours, the Turkana of Kenya. The Daasanach are traditionally pastoralists, but in recent years have become primarily agropastoral
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Gabra People
The Gabra (also written Gabbra or Gebra) are an ethnic group mainly inhabiting the Chalbi Desert
Chalbi Desert
in northern Kenya
Kenya
and the highlands of southern Ethiopia. Camel-herding nomads, Gabra are part of the Oromo; and are closely associated especially with Borana.Contents1 Language 2 Culture 3 Society 4 Religion 5 Genetics 6 References 7 Further readingLanguage[edit] The Gabra speak the dialect of Somali and Oromo, which belongs to the Cushitic branch of the Afro-Asiatic language family. Culture[edit]Traditional camel bell used by the Gabra.The name "Gabra" may have roots in the Oromo word gabaro, meaning "vassal" and possibly indicating an association within the Borana federation
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