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Harbaqa Dam
The Harbaqa Dam
Harbaqa Dam
or Kharbaqa Dam (Arabic: سد خربقة‎) was a Roman era Palmyrene gravity dam in the Syrian desert
Syrian desert
about 70 kilometres (43 mi) southwest from Palmyra
Palmyra
on the road to Damascus. The dam, built of rubble, concrete, and dressed with ashlar stones, dates to the first or second century AD. The dam later was used as a water supply for the Umayyad palace of Qasr al-Hayr al-Gharbi.Contents1 Overview 2 See also 3 References3.1 BibliographyOverview[edit] The dam was built in the first/second-century AD by Palmyra. It was restored and used again by the Umayyads in the eighth century for irrigation purposes
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Syria
Coordinates: 35°N 38°E / 35°N 38°E / 35; 38Syrian Arab
Arab
Republic الجمهورية العربية السورية (Arabic) al-Jumhūrīyah al-ʻArabīyah as-SūrīyahFlagCoat of armsAnthem: "حماة الديار" (Arabic) Humat ad-Diyar Guardians of the HomelandCapital and largest city Damascus 33°30′N 36°18′E / 33.500°N 36.300°E / 33.500; 36.300Official languages ArabicEthnic groupsSyrian Arabs Arameans Kurds Turkomans Assyrians Circassians ArmeniansReligion 87%
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Canal
Canals, or navigations, are human-made channels, or artificial waterways, for water conveyance, or to service water transport vehicles. In most cases, the engineered works will have a series of dams and locks that create reservoirs of low speed current flow. These reservoirs are referred to as slack water levels, often just called levels. A canal is also known as a navigation when it parallels a river and shares part of its waters and drainage basin, and leverages its resources by building dams and locks to increase and lengthen its stretches of slack water levels while staying in its valley. In contrast, a canal cuts across a drainage divide atop a ridge, generally requiring an external water source above the highest elevation. Many canals have been built at elevations towering over valleys and other water ways crossing far below. Canals with sources of water at a higher level can deliver water to a destination such as a city where water is needed
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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Institut Français Du Proche-Orient
The Institut français du Proche-Orient (IFPO), or French Institute of the Near East, is part of the network of French Research Centres abroad. It has branches in Syria, Lebanon
Lebanon
and Jordan.Contents1 History 2 Fields of research and area purposes 3 Organization 4 External linksHistory[edit] The IFPO was created in 2003 by bringing together three existing French Institutes in the area : IFEAD (French Institute for Arab Studies in Damascus, established in 1922), IFAPO (French Institute of near Eastern Archaeology established in Syria
Syria
and Lebanon
Lebanon
in 1946) and CERMOC (Centre for Study and Research on the Contemporary Middle East, est. 1977 in Lebanon
Lebanon
and 1988 in Jordan)
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Syrian Desert
The Syrian Desert
Desert
(Arabic: بادية الشام‎, Bâdiyat aş-Şâm), also known as the Hamad,[1] is a combination of steppe and desert covering 500,000 square kilometers (200,000 square miles) of the Middle East, including parts of south-eastern Syria, northeastern Jordan, northern Saudi Arabia, and western Iraq. To the south it borders and merges into the Arabian Desert.[2] The land is open, gravely desert pavement, cut with occasional wadis.[3][4]Contents1 Location and name 2 Geography 3 Wildlife 4 History4.1 Ancient 4.2 Modern5 See also 6 ReferencesLocation and name[edit] The desert is bounded by the Orontes Valley and volcanic field of Harrat al-Shamah to the west, and by the Euphrates
Euphrates
to the east
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Maison De L'Orient Et De La Méditerranée
The Maison de l'Orient et de la Méditerranée (or MOM) is a research body in Lyon, France
France
that specialises in the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
and the Middle East
Middle East
and the first steps of humanity. It is dedicated to its founder, historian Jean Pouilloux.[1]Contents1 Staff 2 History 3 Research Units 4 References 5 External linksStaff[edit] Anne Schmitt, CNRS, took over directorship from Rémy Boucharlat on 1 January 2011 and conducts research programs within the Archéométrie et archéologie laboratory - UMR 5138 of the MOM. Nathalie Donjon serves as secretary general since 2007 after being recruited in 1988 and attached to the CNRS
CNRS
research administration.[2] History[edit] Founded in 1975, MOMs activity has been characterized by a multidisciplinary working approach
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Daniel Schlumberger
Daniel Théodore Schlumberger (19 December 1904 in Mulhouse, France – 21 October 1972 in Princeton, New Jersey, USA.[1]) was a French archaeologist and Professor of Near Eastern Archaeology at the University of Strasbourg and later Princeton University. In the 1940s, he conducted fieldwork at Ay Khanum in Afghanistan as Director of the Délégation Archéologique Française, discovering ruins and artifacts of the Hellenistic period.[2] His written works were included posthumously in The Cambridge History of Iran (1983). He was an older brother of Jean Schlumberger. References[edit]^ Daniel Schlumberger Institut français du Proche-Orient ^ Answers.com. (2010). Daniel Schlumberger (Obituary: The Times, 25 October 1972)
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Antoine Poidebard
Antoine Poidebard
Antoine Poidebard
(Lyon, 12 October 1878 – Beirut, 17 August 1955) was a French archaeologist and Jesuit
Jesuit
missionary. He pioneered aerial archaeology in the Middle East.[1][2] References[edit]^ Gerster, Georg; Charlotte Trümpler (2007). The Past from Above: Aerial Photographs of Archaeological Sites. Getty Publications. pp. 17–19. ISBN 9780892368754.  ^ Thiollet, Jean-Pierre (2005). Je m'appelle Byblos. H & D Publications. p. 256. ISBN 2 914 266 04 9. This article about a French scientist is a stub
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Silt
Silt
Silt
is granular material of a size between sand and clay, whose mineral origin is quartz[1] and feldspar. Silt
Silt
may occur as a soil (often mixed with sand or clay) or as sediment mixed in suspension with water (also known as a suspended load) and soil in a body of water such as a river. It may also exist as soil deposited at the bottom of a water body, like mudflows from landslides. Silt
Silt
has a moderate specific area with a typically non-sticky, plastic feel. Silt usually has a floury feel when dry, and a slippery feel when wet. Silt can be visually observed with a hand lens, exhibiting a sparkly appearance
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Terracotta
Terracotta, terra cotta or terra-cotta (pronounced [ˌtɛrraˈkɔtta]; Italian: "baked earth",[2] from the Latin terra cocta),[3] a type of earthenware, is a clay-based unglazed or glazed ceramic,[4] where the fired body is porous. Terracotta
Terracotta
is the term normally used for sculpture made in earthenware, and also for various utilitarian uses including vessels (notably flower pots), water and waste water pipes, roofing tiles, bricks, and surface embellishment in building construction.[5] The term is also used to refer to the natural, brownish orange color, of most terracotta, which varies considerably. This article covers the senses of terracotta as a medium in sculpture, as in the Terracotta Army
Terracotta Army
and Greek terracotta figurines, and architectural decoration. Asian and European sculpture in porcelain is not covered
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Georg Gerster
George Gerster (born 30 April 1928) is a Swiss journalist and a pioneer aerial photographer. Born in Winterthur, in 1950 Gerster earned a doctorate at the University of Zurich
University of Zurich
in Germanistik. Through 1956 he worked as an editor for the inhabitants of Zurich's "World Week". Since then he has been active as a freelance journalist with an emphasis on science reporting and flight photography. In this photographic field of activity he did substantial pioneer work in the 1950s and 1960s, respected not only for the technology and quality of his flight pictures, but above all for the universality and internationality of the topics. Gerster's early photographic reportage and picture volumes detailed landscapes of North Africa. In the sixties he documented places of archaeological interest in over 100 countries on all continents
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Qasr Al-Hayr Al-Gharbi
Qasr al-Hayr al-Gharbi
Qasr al-Hayr al-Gharbi
(Arabic: قصر الحير الغربي‎) is a castle or qasr located 80 km south-west of Palmyra
Palmyra
on the Damascus road in Syria, is a twin palace of Qasr al-Hayr al-Sharqi, built by the Umayyad
Umayyad
caliph Hisham ibn Abd al-Malik
Hisham ibn Abd al-Malik
in 727 CE. It was built in the Byzantine
Byzantine
architectural style. It was used as an eye of the king during the Umayyad
Umayyad
era, to control the movement of the desert tribes and to be a barrier against them, as well as being a hunting lodge. Later it was utilized by the Ayyubids and the Mamelukes
Mamelukes
but was abandoned permanently after the Mongol invasions. The castle is quadrangular in outline with 70-meter sides
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Roman Empire
Mediolanum
Mediolanum
(286–402, Western) Augusta Treverorum Sirmium Ravenna
Ravenna
(402–476, Western)
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