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Hansel And Gretel
"Hansel and Gretel" (also known as Hansel and Grettel, Hansel and Grethel, or Little Brother and Little Sister) (/ˈhænsəl/ or /ˈhɑːnsəl/ and /ˈɡrɛtəl/; German: Hänsel und Gretel (Hänsel und Grethel)[a] [ˈhɛnzl̩ ʊnt ˈɡʁeːtl̩]) is a well-known fairy tale of German origin, recorded by the Brothers Grimm
Brothers Grimm
and published in 1812. Hansel and Gretel
Hansel and Gretel
are a young brother and sister kidnapped by a cannibalistic witch living deep in the forest in a house constructed of cake and confectionery. The two children escape with their lives by outwitting her
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Proto-Indo-European Society
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle Dnieper Bronze
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Iona Opie
Iona Margaret Balfour Opie, CBE, FBA (13 October 1923 – 23 October 2017)[1] and Peter Mason Opie (25 November 1918 – 5 February 1982) were a married team of folklorists, who applied modern techniques to children's literature, summarised in their studies The Oxford Dictionary of Nursery Rhymes (1951) and The Lore and Language of Schoolchildren (1959). They were also noted anthologists, and assembled large collections of children's literature, toys, and games.Contents1 Overview 2 Opie Collections 3 Selected works 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksOverview[edit] Iona Margaret Balfour Archibald was born in Colchester, Essex, England. She was a researcher and writer on European folklore and children's street culture.[citation needed] She is considered an authority on children's rhymes, street & playground games and the Mother Goose
Mother Goose
tradition
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Margaret (name)
Margaret
Margaret
is a female first name, derived via French (Marguerite) and Latin (Margarita) from Greek Margarites, derived from the noun margaron meaning 'pearl'.[1] The Greek is derived through contact from the Old Persian
Old Persian
word for pearl *margārīta- (compare Modern Persian morvārīd "pearl"), which was cognate to the Sanskrit मञ्जरी mañjarī meaning "pearl" or "cluster of blossoms".[2][3][4][5] Margaret
Margaret
has been an English name since the 11th century, and remained popular throughout the Middle Ages. It became less popular between the 16th century and 18th century, but became more common again after this period, becoming the second most popular name in the United States
United States
in 1903
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Baba Yaga
In Slavic folklore, Baba Yaga
Baba Yaga
is a supernatural being (or one of a trio of sisters of the same name) who appears as a deformed and/or ferocious-looking woman. Baba Yaga
Baba Yaga
flies around in a mortar, wields a pestle, and dwells deep in the forest in a hut usually described as standing on chicken legs. Baba Yaga
Baba Yaga
may help or hinder those that encounter or seek her out and may play a maternal role and has associations with forest wildlife
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Cockaigne
Cockaigne
Cockaigne
or Cockayne /kɒˈkeɪn/ is a land of plenty in medieval myth, an imaginary place of extreme luxury and ease where physical comforts and pleasures are always immediately at hand and where the harshness of medieval peasant life does not exist.[1] Specifically, in poems like The Land of Cockaigne, Cockaigne
Cockaigne
is a land of contraries, where all the restrictions of society are defied (abbots beaten by their monks), sexual liberty is open (nuns flipped over to show their bottoms), and food is plentiful (skies that rain cheeses). Writing about Cockaigne
Cockaigne
was a commonplace of Goliard
Goliard
verse
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Arthur Rackham
Arthur Rackham
Arthur Rackham
(19 September 1867 – 6 September 1939) was an English book illustrator. Contents1 Biography 2 Significance 3 Technique 4 Notable works 5 Gallery 6 Influence 7 References 8 External linksBiography[edit] Rackham was born in Lewisham, then still part of Kent
Kent
as one of 12 children. In 1884, at the age of 17, he was sent on an ocean voyage to Australia to improve his fragile health, accompanied by two aunts.[1] At the age of 18, he worked as a clerk at the Westminster Fire Office and began studying part-time at the Lambeth School of Art.[2] In 1892, he left his job and started working for the Westminster Budget as a reporter and illustrator. His first book illustrations were published in 1893 in To the Other Side by Thomas Rhodes, but his first serious commission was in 1894 for The Dolly Dialogues, the collected sketches of Anthony Hope, who later went on to write The Prisoner of Zenda
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Edward Vajda
Edward J. Vajda (Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, September 10, 1958 as Edward M. Johnson; changed his name in 1981)[1] is a historical linguist at Western Washington University. He has become known for his work on the proposed Dené–Yeniseian language family, seeking to establish that the Ket language
Ket language
of Siberia
Siberia
has a common linguistic ancestor with the Na-Dené languages
Na-Dené languages
of North America. He began to study the Ket language
Ket language
in the 1990s, after the dissolution of the Soviet Union; he interviewed Ket speakers in Germany
Germany
and later traveled to Tomsk
Tomsk
in southwestern Siberia
Siberia
to perform fieldwork
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Alfred A. Knopf, Inc.
Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. is a New York publishing house that was founded by Alfred A. Knopf Sr. in 1915. The publisher had a reputation for a pursuit of perfection and elegant taste.[1] It was acquired by Random House in 1960 and is now part of the Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group.[2] The Knopf publishing house is associated with its borzoi colophon (shown at right), which was designed by co-founder Blanche Knopf in 1925.[3]Contents1 History 2 Awards 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit]Alfred A. Knopf Sr., 1935Knopf was founded in 1915 by Alfred A. Knopf, Sr. with a $5,000 advance from his father.[3] The first office was located in New York's Candler Building. The publishing house was officially incorporated in 1918, with Alfred Knopf as president, Blanche Knopf as vice-president, and Samuel Knopf as treasurer
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Madame D'Aulnoy
Marie-Catherine Le Jumel de Barneville, Baroness d'Aulnoy (1650/1651–4 January 1705), also known as Countess d'Aulnoy, was a French writer known for her fairy tales. When she termed her works contes de fées (fairy tales), she originated the term that is now generally used for the genre.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Issue 3 Works 4 Notes 5 References 6 External links and resourcesBiography[edit] D'Aulnoy was born in Barneville-la-Bertran, Calvados, as a member of the noble family of Le Jumel de Barneville.[2] In 1666, she was given at the age of fifteen (by her father) in an arranged marriage to a Parisian thirty years older—François de la Motte, Baron d'Aulnoy, of the household of the Duke of Vendôme. The baron was a freethinker and a known gambler. In 1669, the Baron d'Aulnoy was accused of treason (speaking out against imposed taxes by the King) by two men who may have been the lovers of Mme d'Aulnoy (aged nineteen) and her mother, The Marchioness de Gadagne ([3])
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Oxford University Press
Oxford
Oxford
University Press (OUP) is the largest university press in the world,[1] and the second oldest after Cambridge University
Cambridge University
Press. It is a department of the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
and is governed by a group of 15 academics appointed by the vice-chancellor known as the delegates of the press. They are headed by the secretary to the delegates, who serves as OUP's chief executive and as its major representative on other university bodies
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Charles Perrault
Charles Perrault
Charles Perrault
(French: [ʃaʁl pɛʁo]; 12 January 1628 – 16 May 1703) was a French author and member of the Académie Française. He laid the foundations for a new literary genre, the fairy tale, with his works derived from pre-existing folk tales
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Ogre
An ogre (feminine ogress) is a term used in myth and folk tales for a variety of abominable and brutish hominid monsters, informally large, unpleasant, grotesque, predatory, and typically cannibalistic towards normal human beings, infants, and children. Ogres and similar creatures feature in mythology, folklore, and fiction around the world, appearing in many classic works of literature and fairy tales. Ogres vary in size depending on the depiction, ranging from moderately large and heavyset by human standards to inhuman and disproportionate giants. Common features include disproportionately large heads, abundant hair, unusually colored skin, strong body, a voracious appetite, and a generally hideous appearance, odor, and manner
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Peter Opie
Iona Margaret Balfour Opie, CBE, FBA (13 October 1923 – 23 October 2017)[1] and Peter Mason Opie (25 November 1918 – 5 February 1982) were a married team of folklorists, who applied modern techniques to children's literature, summarised in their studies The Oxford Dictionary of Nursery Rhymes (1951) and The Lore and Language of Schoolchildren (1959). They were also noted anthologists, and assembled large collections of children's literature, toys, and games.Contents1 Overview 2 Opie Collections 3 Selected works 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksOverview[edit] Iona Margaret Balfour Archibald was born in Colchester, Essex, England. She was a researcher and writer on European folklore and children's street culture.[citation needed] She is considered an authority on children's rhymes, street & playground games and the Mother Goose
Mother Goose
tradition
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