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Hankook Ilbo
Hankook Ilbo
Hankook Ilbo
is a South Korean vernacular daily newspaper published by the Hankook Ilbo Media Group in Seoul, South Korea. Its sister publications include The Korea Times, Seoul
Seoul
Economic Daily, Sports Hankook, Children's Hankook Ilbo, Weekly Hankook and The Korea Times in North America.Contents1 Etymology 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksEtymology[edit] In South Korea, "Hankook" means "Korea", referring to "South Korea". See also[edit]List of newspapers Communications in South Korea Miss KoreaReferences[edit]External links[edit]Official site (in Korean)This article about a newspaper published in South Korea
South Korea
is a stub
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Anju (food)
Anju (안주; 按酒 [an.dʑu]) is a Korean term for food consumed with alcohol. It consists of a variety of foods, including both main dishes and side dishes. Consuming food with alcohol is a widespread practice in Korea, especially when the alcoholic beverage soju is involved.[1][2] Food consumed with alcohol is called sakana (肴) in Japan. Certain types of foods consumed primarily as Anju include golbaengi muchim, nogari with peanuts, and jokbal.Contents1 History 2 By types of liquor 3 By the place where alcohol is served 4 Sample images 5 See also 6 References 7 Further readingHistory[edit] Until the Chosun Dynasty, alcohol was mainly served in jumaks (a type of inn or tavern), where soups with rice, along with traditional alcohol such as makgeolli, were served to guests
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Patbingsu
Patbingsu
Patbingsu
(팥빙수, sometimes anglicized as patbingsoo, literally "red beans shaved ice") is a popular Korean shaved ice dessert with sweet toppings that may include chopped fruit, condensed milk, fruit syrup, and red beans.[1] Varieties with ingredients other than red beans are called bingsu[2] (or bingsoo).[3] The food originally began as ice shavings with red bean paste (known as pat, 팥). Many varieties of patbingsu exist in contemporary culture.Contents1 History 2 Variations 3 Availability 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The early forms of patbingsu consisted of shaved ice and two or three ingredients, typically red bean paste, tteok, and ground nut powder.[4] The earliest forms of patbingsu existed during the Joseon Dynasty (1392–1910)
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North–South Differences In The Korean Language
The Korean language has changed between the two states due to the length of time that North and South Korea have been separated.[1] Korean orthography, as defined by the Korean Language Society in 1933 in the "Proposal for Unified Korean Orthography" (Hangul: 한글 맞춤법 통일안; RR: Hangeul Matchumbeop Tong-iran) continued to be used by the North and the South after liberation of Korea in 1945, but with the establishments of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea and the Republic of Korea in 1948, the two states have taken on differing policies regarding the language. In 1954, North Korea set out the rules for Korean orthography
Korean orthography
(조선어 철자법 Josŏnŏ Chŏljabŏp)
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Korean Grammar
This article is a description of the morphology, syntax, and semantics of Korean. For phonetics and phonology, see Korean phonology
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Korean Honorifics
The Korean language
Korean language
reflects the important observance of a speaker or writer's relationships with both the subject of the sentence and the audience. Korean grammar uses an extensive system of honorifics to reflect the speaker's relationship to the subject of the sentence and speech levels to reflect the speaker's relationship to the audience. Originally, the honorifics expressed the differences in social status between speakers
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Newspaper
A newspaper is a periodical publication containing written information about current events. Newspapers
Newspapers
can cover wide variety of fields such as politics, business, sport and art and often include materials such as opinion columns, weather forecasts, reviews of local services, obituaries, birth notices, crosswords, editorial cartoons, comic strips, and advice columns. Most newspapers are businesses, and they pay their expenses with a mixture of subscription revenue, newsstand sales, and advertising revenue. The journalism organizations that publish newspapers are themselves often metonymically called newspapers. Newspapers
Newspapers
have traditionally been published in print (usually on cheap, low-grade paper called newsprint)
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Gimbap
Gimbap
Gimbap
(김밥) is a Korean dish made from cooked rice and other ingredients that are rolled in gim—dried sheets of laver seaweed—and served in bite-sized slices.[1] The dish is often part of a packed meal, or dosirak, to be eaten at picnics and outdoor events, and can serve as a light lunch along with danmuji (yellow pickled radish) and kimchi. It is a popular take-out food in Korea
Korea
and abroad,[2] and is known as a convenient food because of its portability
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Bibimbap
Bibimbap[2] (/ˈbiːbɪmbæp/ BEE-bim-bap,[3] from Korean bibimbap [pi.bim.p͈ap̚]), sometimes anglicized as bi bim bap or bi bim bop, is a Korean dish. The word literally means "mixed rice". Bibimbap
Bibimbap
is served as a bowl of warm white rice topped with namul (sautéed and seasoned vegetables) and gochujang (chili pepper paste), soy sauce, or doenjang (a fermented soybean paste). A raw or fried egg and sliced meat (usually beef) are common additions. The hot dish is stirred together thoroughly just before eating.[4] In South Korea, Jeonju, Jinju, and Tongyeong
Tongyeong
are especially famous for their versions of bibimbap.[5] In 2011, it was listed at number 40 on the World's 50 most delicious foods readers' poll compiled by CNN Travel.[6]Contents1 History 2 Preparation 3 Variations 4 Symbolism 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The name bibimbap was adopted in the early 20th century
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History Of The Korean Language
The Korean language
Korean language
is attested from the early centuries of the Common Era in Chinese characters. The Featural writing system
Featural writing system
called Hangul was introduced only in the fifteenth century and was not widespread until the 20th century. The periodization of the historical stages of Korean is as follows:Before the first century: Proto-Korean First to tenth century: Old Korean Tenth to sixteenth century: Middle Korean Seventeenth century to present: Modern KoreanContents1 Proto-Korean 2 Old Korean 3 Middle Korean 4 Modern Korean 5 ReferencesProto-Korean[edit] Further information: Altaic languages, Buyeo languages, Koreanic languages, and Classification of the Japonic languages Korean being a language isolate, "Proto-Korean" is not a well-defined term, referring to the language spoken in prehistoric Korea during the Bronze and Iron ages
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Seolleongtang
Seolleongtang[1] (설렁탕) or ox bone soup[1] is a Korean broth tang (soup) made from ox bones (mostly leg bones), brisket and other cuts. Seasoning is generally done at the table according to personal taste by adding salt, ground black pepper, red pepper, minced garlic, or chopped spring onions. It is a local dish of Seoul.[2] Seolleongtang
Seolleongtang
is typically simmered over a low flame over a period of several hours to an entire day, to allow the flavor to be gradually extracted from the bones. It has a milky off-white, cloudy appearance and is normally eaten together with rice and several side dishes; the rice is sometimes added directly to the soup.[3] History and etymology[edit] In the Joseon dynasty, Koreans regularly made nationwide sacrifices to their ancestors, such as Dangun
Dangun
(the legendary founder of the kingdom of Gojoseon)
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Kimchi
Kimchi
Kimchi
(/ˈkɪmtʃiː/; Korean: 김치, translit. gimchi, IPA: [kim.tɕʰi]), a staple in Korean cuisine, is a traditional side dish made from salted and fermented vegetables, most commonly napa cabbage and Korean radishes, with a variety of seasonings including chili powder, scallions, garlic, ginger, and jeotgal (salted seafood).[1][2] There are hundreds of varieties of kimchi made with different vegetables as the main ingredients.[3][4] In traditional preparations, kimchi was stored underground in jars to keep cool, and unfrozen during the winter months.[2] With the rise of technology, kimchi refrigerators are more commonly used to make kimc
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Korean Fried Chicken
Korean fried chicken
Korean fried chicken
or KFC,[1][2][3] usually called chikin (치킨, from the English "chicken") in Korea, refers to a variety of fried chicken dishes from South Korea, including the basic huraideu-chikin (후라이드 치킨, from the English "fried chicken") and spicy yangnyeom-chikin (양념 치킨, "seasoned chicken").[4] In South Korea, fried chicken is consumed as a meal, an appetizer, anju (food that is served and eaten with drinks), or as an after-meal snack.[5] Korean fried chicken
Korean fried chicken
differs from typical American fried chicken because it is fried twice; the skin is therefore crunchier and less greasy
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Tteok
Soups & stewsGuk Tang Jeongol Jijimi JjigaeBanchanBokkeum BuchimgaeJeonBugak Gui Hoe Jjim Jokpyeon Jorim Muk Namul Pyeonyuk Po Seon SsamDesserts HangwaDasik Gwapyeon Jeonggwa Kkultarae Suksilgwa Yakbap Yeot Yeotgangjeong YugwaGangjeong HangwaYumilgwaMandugwa Taraegwa YakgwaTteokBaekseolgi Bupyeon Gyeongdan Injeolmi Jeolpyeon Jeungpyeon Mujigae-tteok Siru-tteok SongpyeonBeverages List of Korean beveragesCha Hwachae Sikhye Sul(alcoholic beverages) SujeonggwaCondimentsDoenjang GanjangGukganjang EoganjangGochujang Honey Cheong Mustard sauce OilPerilla oil Sesame
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Banchan
Soups & stewsGuk Tang Jeongol Jijimi JjigaeBanchanBokkeum BuchimgaeJeonBugak Gui Hoe Jjim Jokpyeon Jorim Muk Namul Pyeonyuk Po Seon SsamDesserts HangwaDasik Gwapyeon Jeonggwa Kkultarae Suksilgwa Yakbap Yeot Yeotgangjeong YugwaGangjeong HangwaYumilgwaMandugwa Taraegwa YakgwaTteokBaekseolgi Bupyeon Gyeongdan Injeolmi Jeolpyeon Jeungpyeon Mujigae-tteok Siru-tteok SongpyeonBeverages List of Korean beveragesCha Hwachae Sikhye Sul(alcoholic beverages) SujeonggwaCondimentsDoenjang GanjangGukganjang EoganjangGochujang Honey Cheong Mustard sauce OilPerilla oil Sesame oilSsamjang VinegarPersimmon vinegar Rice vinegarUtensilsDolsot Onggi Siru Sujeo TtukbaegiOther Kimchi
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