HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Hammond, Louisiana
Hammond is the largest city in Tangipahoa Parish, Louisiana, United States, located 45 miles (72 km) east of Baton Rouge and 45 miles (72 km) northwest of New Orleans. Its population was 20,019 in the 2010 census; Hammond is home to Southeastern Louisiana
Louisiana
University and is the principal city of the Hammond Metropolitan Statistical Area, which includes all of Tangipahoa Parish.Contents1 History1.1 19th century 1.2 20th & 21st centuries2 Geography 3 Crime 4 Demographics 5 Government and infrastructure 6 Education 7 Health care 8 Transportation8.1 Passenger rail 8.2 Highways 8.3 Airport9 Media 10 Notable people 11 Climate 12 See also 13 References 14 External linksHistory[edit] 19th century[edit] The city is named for Peter Hammond (1798–1870), the surname anglicized from Peter av Hammerdal
Hammerdal
(Peter of Hammerdal) — a Swedish immigrant who first settled the area around 1818
[...More...]

"Hammond, Louisiana" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Prisoner Of War
A prisoner of war (POW) is a person, whether combatant or non-combatant, who is held in custody by a belligerent power during or immediately after an armed conflict
[...More...]

"Prisoner Of War" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Live Oak Society
The Live Oak Society
Live Oak Society
was founded in 1934, to advance the culture, distribution, preservation, and appreciation of the southern live oak (Quercus virginiana) and functions under the auspices of the Louisiana Garden Club Federation, Inc.[1][2] By 2013, more than 7,000 live oaks had been registered at the Society.Contents1 History 2 Features 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Dr. Edwin Lewis Stephens, president of Southwestern Louisiana Institute (University of Louisiana at Lafayette) from 1900 to 1938, founded the Live Oak Society
Live Oak Society
in 1934.[1] In 1957, responsibility for maintaining records and registering new applicants was assumed by the Louisiana Garden Club Federation, Inc.[3] According to Society bylaws, the only human member permitted in the Society is the honorary Chairman, who is responsible for registering and recording live oak members
[...More...]

"Live Oak Society" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Napoleonic Wars
The Napoleonic Wars
Napoleonic Wars
(1803–1815) were a series of major conflicts pitting the French Empire and its allies, led by Napoleon
Napoleon
I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, financed and usually led by the United Kingdom. The wars stemmed from the unresolved disputes associated with the French Revolution
French Revolution
and its resultant conflict. The wars are often categorised into five conflicts, each termed after the coalition that fought Napoleon; the Third Coalition
Third Coalition
(1805), the Fourth (1806–07), Fifth (1809), Sixth (1813), and the Seventh and final (1815). Napoleon, upon ascending to First Consul of France
France
in 1799, had inherited a chaotic republic; he subsequently created a state with stable finances, a strong bureaucracy, and a well-trained army
[...More...]

"Napoleonic Wars" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Head Of Navigation
Head of navigation is the farthest point above the mouth of a river that can be navigated by ships. Determining the head of navigation can be subjective on many streams, as this point may vary greatly with the size of the ship being contemplated for navigation and the seasonal water level. On others, it is quite objective, being caused by a waterfall or a dam without navigation locks. Several rivers in a region may have their heads of navigation along a line called the Fall line.This article related to water transport is a stub
[...More...]

"Head Of Navigation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

History Of Slavery In Louisiana
The history of slavery in the area currently known as Louisiana
Louisiana
did not begin only with colonial settlement by Europeans, as Native Americans also reduced captured enemies to the status of slaves.[citation needed] Following Robert Cavelier de La Salle
Robert Cavelier de La Salle
establishing the French claim to the territory and the introduction of the name Louisiana, the first settlements in the southernmost portion of Louisiana
Louisiana
(New France) were developed at present-day Biloxi (1699), Mobile (1702), Natchitoches (1714), and New Orleans
New Orleans
(1718)
[...More...]

"History Of Slavery In Louisiana" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

American Civil War
Union victoryDissolution of the Confederate States U.S. territorial integrity preserved Slavery abolished Beginning of the Reconstruction EraBelligerents United States  Confederate StatesCommanders and leaders Abraham Lincoln Ulysses S. Grant William T. Sherman David Farragut George B. McClellan Henry Halleck George Meade and others Jefferson Davis Robert E. Lee  J. E. Johnston  G. T. Beauregard  A. S
[...More...]

"American Civil War" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Union Army
American Indian Wars American Civil WarFort Sumter First Bull Run Wilson's Creek Forts Henry and Donelson Shenandoah South Mills Richmond Harpers Ferry Munfordville Shepherdstown Chambersburg Raid Mississippi River Peninsula Shiloh Jackson's Valley Campaign Second Bull Run South Mountain Antietam Hartsville Fredericksburg Stones River Chancellorsville Gettysburg Champion Hill Vicksburg siege Corydon Chickamauga Chattanooga Wilderness Atlanta Spotsylvania Sabine Pass New Hope Church Pickett's Mill Cold Harbor Plymouth Fort Pillow Petersburg siege Kennesaw Mountain Jonesborough Franklin Nashville Appomattox Court HouseCommandersCommander-in-Chief 16th President of the United States
United States
- Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln
(1861-1865) 17th President Andrew Johnson
Andrew Johnson
(1865)General-in-Chief 1st: Winfield Scott 2nd: George B. McClellan 3rd: Henry W. Halleck Final: Ulysses S
[...More...]

"Union Army" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Raid (military)
Raiding, also known as depredation, is a military tactic or operational warfare mission which has a specific purpose and is not normally intended to capture and hold terrain but instead finish with the raiding force quickly retreating to a previous defended position prior to enemy forces being able to respond in a coordinated manner or formulate a counter-attack. A raiding group may consist of combatants specially trained in this tactic, such as commandos, or as a special mission assigned to any general troops. Raids are often a standard tactic in irregular warfare, employed by warriors, guerrilla fighters or other irregular military forces
[...More...]

"Raid (military)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Illinois Central Railroad
The Illinois
Illinois
Central Railroad
Railroad
(reporting mark IC), sometimes called the Main Line of Mid-America, was a railroad in the central United States, with its primary routes connecting Chicago, Illinois, with New Orleans, Louisiana, and Mobile, Alabama. A line also connected Chicago with Sioux City, Iowa
Sioux City, Iowa
(1870). There was a significant branch to Omaha, Nebraska (1899), west of Fort Dodge, Iowa, and another branch reaching Sioux Falls, South Dakota
Sioux Falls, South Dakota
(1877), starting from Cherokee, Iowa
[...More...]

"Illinois Central Railroad" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Confederate States Army
1,082,119 total who served[1]464,646 peak in 1863Part of C.S. War DepartmentColors Cadet gray
Cadet gray
     [2]March "Dixie"EngagementsAmerican Indian Wars Cortina Troubles American Civil WarSumter First Manassas Wilson's Creek Henry and Donelson Shenandoah South Mills Richmond Harpers Ferry Munfordville Shepherdstown Chambersburg
Chambersburg
Raid Mississippi
Mississippi
River Peninsula Shiloh Jackson's Valley Campaign Second Manassas Sharpsburg Hartsville Fredericksburg Murfreesborough Chancellorsville Gettysburg Vicksburg Corydon Chickamauga Chattanooga Wilderness Atlanta Spotsylvania New Hope Church Pickett's Mill Cold Harbor Sabine Pass Plymouth Fort Pillow Petersburg St. Albans Kennesaw Mountain Jonesborough Franklin Nashville Appomattox Court HouseCommandersCommander-in-Chief Jefferson Davis
Jefferson Davis
 General-in-Chief
[...More...]

"Confederate States Army" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Sweden
Coordinates: 63°N 16°E / 63°N 16°E / 63; 16Kingdom of Sweden Konungariket Sverige[a]FlagGreater coat of armsMotto: (royal) "För Sverige – i tiden"[a] "For Sweden
Sweden
– With the Times"[1]Anthem: Du gamla, Du fria[b] Thou ancient, thou freeRoyal anthem: Kungssången Song of the KingLocation of  Sweden  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)  –  [Legend]Capital and largest city Stockholm 5
[...More...]

"Sweden" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

History Of Yellow Fever
The evolutionary origins of yellow fever most likely lie in Africa.[1][2] Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the virus originated from East or Central Africa, with transmission between primates and humans, and spread from there to West Africa.[3] The virus as well as the vector Aedes aegypti, a mosquito species, were probably brought to the western hemisphere and the Americas by slave trade ships from Africa after the first European exploration in 1492.[4] The first outbreaks of disease that were probably yellow fever occurred in the Windward Islands of the Caribbean on Barbados in 1647 and Guadalupe in 1648.[5] Barbados had undergone an ecological transformation with the introduction of sugar cultivation by the Dutch. Plentiful forest present in the 1640s were completely gone by the 1660s. By the early 18th century, the same transformation related to sugar cultivation had occurred on the larger islands of Jamaica, Hispaniola and Cuba
[...More...]

"History Of Yellow Fever" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Commemorative Plaque
A commemorative plaque, or simply plaque, or in other places referred to as a historical marker or historic plaque, is a plate of metal, ceramic, stone, wood, or other material, typically attached to a wall, stone, or other vertical surface, and bearing text or an image in relief, or both, to commemorate one or more persons, an event, a former use of the place, or some other thing. Many modern plaques and markers are used to associate the location where the plaque or marker is installed with the person, event, or item commemorated as a place worthy of visit.[1] A monumental plaque or tablet commemorating a deceased person or persons, can be a simple form of church monument. Most modern plaques affixed in this way are commemorative of something, but this is not always the case, and there are purely religious plaques, or those signifying ownership or affiliation of some sort
[...More...]

"Commemorative Plaque" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Webster Parish
Webster Parish (French: Paroisse de Webster) is a parish located in the northwestern section of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Louisiana. The seat of the parish is Minden.[1] As of the 2010 census, the Webster Parish population was 41,207.[2] In 2017, the population estimate was 39,710, a decline of nearly 3.8 percent since the 2011 estimated count of 41,259. The decline represents an average loss of 258 persons per year. Public officials who have long sought to increase the industrial potential of the parish, expressed concern over the downward spiral. Jim Bonsall, the president of the Webster Parish Police Jury, the parish governing body, cited the ending of the Haynesville Shale
Haynesville Shale
boom as the primary reason for the population losses
[...More...]

"Webster Parish" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Greenville, Mississippi
Greenville is a city in, and the county seat of, Washington County, Mississippi, United States.[2] The population was 34,400 at the 2010 census
[...More...]

"Greenville, Mississippi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.