HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Ham Sandwich
The ham sandwich is a common type of sandwich.[1] The bread may be buttered or toasted.Contents1 History 2 Consumption 3 Health 4 Cultural impact 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The ham sandwich is one of the earliest recorded closed-face sandwiches; by 1850, at least 70 London street vendors offered it.[2] In 18th-century Britain the sandwich was still closely associated with Spanish cuisine, which (considering the especially wide consumption of ham in Spain) may suggest that sandwiches with ham were preferred at that time as well. There were also records of closed face sandwiches on Melrose St
[...More...]

"Ham Sandwich" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Vegetable Sandwich
Vegetable
Vegetable
sandwich is vegetarian sandwich consisting of various vegetables which may include mushrooms and cheese.[1][2] It consists of vegetable filling between bread. The most commonly used vegetables for this sandwich are tomato, cucumber and potato. Other vegetables used include dill and onion.[3][4] Cheese
Cheese
may be added, if available, and the sandwich is usually open to customization by adding or withholding certain ingredients, or leaving it untoasted. Innumerable variations are available changing from location and vendors.[5][6] Vegetable
Vegetable
sandwiches are served throughout the world and popular in India.[7][8] See also[edit]Food portalList of sandwichesReferences[edit]^ Ray, Rachael. "Great Grilled Vegetable
Vegetable
Sandwich". Food Network. Retrieved 2018-03-22.  ^ Thomson, Natalie (16 March 2018). "Swap sandwiches for smørrebrød". The Telegraph
[...More...]

"Vegetable Sandwich" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Prosciutto
Prosciutto
Prosciutto
(/prəˈʃuːtoʊ/,[1] Italian: [proʃˈʃutto])[2] is an Italian dry-cured ham that is usually thinly sliced and served uncooked; this style is called prosciutto crudo in Italian (or simply crudo) and is distinguished from cooked ham, prosciutto cotto. A number of regions have their own variations of prosciutto, each with degrees of protected status, but the most prized are the Prosciutto
Prosciutto
di Parma
Parma
PDO from the Emilia-Romagna
Emilia-Romagna
region and the Prosciutto
Prosciutto
di San Daniele PDO from the Friuli-Venezia Giulia
Friuli-Venezia Giulia
region
[...More...]

"Prosciutto" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Country Ham
Country ham
Country ham
is a variety of ham produced using a method of curing and smoking practiced in Southeast U.S. states such as North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, Georgia, Kentucky, Maryland, and other nearby states.[1] Virginia
Virginia
ham is a country ham produced in Virginia[2] (including the more-precisely-defined Smithfield ham); whereas " Virginia
Virginia
Style" refers to a curing style, not a location.[3]Contents1 Production 2 Preparation 3 See also 4 References 5 Further readingProduction[edit] Country hams are salt-cured (with or without nitrites) for one to three months. They are usually hardwood smoked (usually hickory and Red Oak), but some types of country ham, such as the "salt-and-pepper ham" of North Carolina, are not smoked
[...More...]

"Country Ham" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Elenski But
Elenski but (Bulgarian: еленски бут or (more precisely[1] but less commonly) бут по еленски, sometimes translated as Elena round or Elena leg) is a dry-cured ham from the town of Elena in northern Bulgaria
Bulgaria
and a popular delicacy throughout the country. The meat has a specific taste and can be preserved in the course of several years, owing much to the special process of making and the climatic conditions of the part of Stara Planina
Stara Planina
where Elena is located.Contents1 Preparation1.1 Preservation technologies2 See also 3 Notes 4 External linksPreparation[edit] The legs and quarters of the pig, traditionally singed and scraped, are taken from the body. Later the redundant parts are removed, so that the remaining meat is protected by hide or the skin that surrounds the muscle tissue
[...More...]

"Elenski But" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gammon (meat)
Gammon is the hind leg of pork after it has been cured by dry-salting or brining.[1] It may or may not be smoked. Like bacon, it needs to be cooked before it can be eaten.[2] It may be sold on-the-bone or without bone, or as steaks or slices. It differs from ham in that ham is cured after being cut from the carcass and the curing process for ham may be different.[3] Gammon hock (or knuckle) is the foot end of the joint, and contains more connective tissue and sinew.[4] Joints of cooked gammon are often served at Christmas, or on Boxing Day. The words gammon, ham and bacon are sometimes used interchangeably. Particularly in the US, the "fresh ham" may refer to raw, uncured hind leg of pork.[5] Glazed gammon, or glazed ham in the US, is coated with a flavoured or spiced sugar solution before cooking. This caramelizes during cooking and also gives a distinctive appearance
[...More...]

"Gammon (meat)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jamón
Jamón
Jamón
(Spanish pronunciation: [xaˈmon], pl. jamones) is the Spanish word for Ham. In English it refers to certain types of dry-cured ham from Spain
[...More...]

"Jamón" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jamón Ibérico
Jamón
Jamón
ibérico (Spanish: [χaˈmon iˈβeɾiko]; Portuguese: presunto ibérico [pɾɨˈzũtu iˈβɛɾiku]), "Iberian ham", is a type of cured ham produced in Spain
Spain
and Portugal
[...More...]

"Jamón Ibérico" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jamón Serrano
Jamón
Jamón
serrano (Spanish: [xaˈmon seˈrano]; "Serrano ham", literally "ham from the sierra, or mountain range") is a type of dry-cured Spanish jamón (ham) which includes most varieties other than those made with black Iberian pigs (jamón ibérico). It is generally served in thin slices, occasionally diced.Contents1 Description 2 Preparation 3 See also 4 ReferencesDescription[edit]A plate of jamón serrano in MadridThe majority of serrano hams are made from a landrace breed of white pigs or from commercial breeds such as Duroc, and are not to be confused with the often more expensive jamón ibérico, made from Black Iberian Pigs. These aged hams were known as a delicacy even in the days of the Roman Empire. Though not expensive in Spain
Spain
and the European Union, duties imposed on imported meats and exchange rates makes these hams more costly outside the EU
[...More...]

"Jamón Serrano" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jinhua Ham
Jinhua
Jinhua
ham is a type of dry-cured ham named after the city of Jinhua, where it is produced, in the Zhejiang
Zhejiang
province of eastern China.[1] The ham is used in Chinese cuisines to flavour stewed and braised foods as well as for making the stocks and broths of many Chinese soups. The ham was awarded first prize in the 1915 Panama International Merchandise Exhibition.[2] It is a well-known ham in China.[3]Contents1 Production 2 Culture 3 Flavour analysis 4 Pesticide scandal 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksProduction[edit] Jinhua
Jinhua
ham is traditionally produced using the hind legs of a breed of pigs native to China
China
known as the "two ends black" (兩頭烏), which have black hair growing on their heads and hindquarters with white midsections
[...More...]

"Jinhua Ham" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lacón Gallego
Lacón gallego (Spanish pronunciation: [laˈkoŋ ɡaˈʎeɣo], "Galician-style Lacón [pork shoulder]") is a dried ham product from Galicia, Spain
Spain
with PGI status under European law. Historically, Lacón has been mentioned in texts since at least the 17th century. Under law, production of Lacón gallego may take place solely in Galicia, from the rearing and slaughter of the pigs, to the curing of the final product. The actual product is only made with the shoulder, rather than the whole leg, as is usual with other jamones (hams). The following breeds of pig may be used to make Lacón: Celtic, Large White, Landrace
Landrace
or Duroc, and in there are two type of Lacón, depending on how the pig is reared;Traditional Lacón gallego may be called so when the pig has been fed on a diet of only natural feed, e.g
[...More...]

"Lacón Gallego" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Njeguška Pršuta
Njeguški pršut
Njeguški pršut
is a specialty of Njeguši, a village in Montenegro. Pršut
Pršut
is dry-cured ham, served uncooked, similar to Italian Prosciutto. Its particular flavour and aroma are, according to manufacturers,[1] the result of the mixture of sea and mountain air and beech wood burned during the drying process.[2][3] The curing process includes salting with sea salt for about three weeks, pressing to remove excess liquid for about three weeks, light smoking and drying in the cool mountain breeze for three months followed by maturing process. The whole cycle takes about a year.Sliced njeguški pršutSee also[edit]Food portalPršut Cuisine of Montenegro List of hams List of dried foodsReferences[edit]^ http://www.pobjeda.co.me/citanje.php?datum=2010-10-10&id=192950 ^ " Montenegro
Montenegro
Guide". MontenegroGuide.com. Retrieved 2009-04-22.  ^ "Recipes of Montenegro"
[...More...]

"Njeguška Pršuta" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Presunto
Presunto
Presunto
(European Portuguese: [pɾɨˈzũtu], Brazilian Portuguese: [pɾeˈzũtu]) is dry-cured ham from Portugal, similar to Spanish jamón or Italian prosciutto crudo. Among the wide variety of presuntos in Portugal, the most famous are presunto from Chaves, produced in the north of Portugal, and that from the Alentejo, in the south, made from local Alentejano pigs.[citation needed] In Brazil, the wet-cured ham called fiambre ([ˈfjɐ̃bɾɨ] or [fiˈɐ̃bɾi]) is often also called presunto. Several varieties of presunto are protected by European law with geographical indications.Contents1 Etymology
[...More...]

"Presunto" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Rugao Ham
Rugao
Rugao
ham (Chinese: 如皋火腿; pinyin: Rúgāo Huǒtuǐ) is a dry-cured ham that originated in Jiangsu
Jiangsu
province, China.[1][2][3] It dates to the Qing dynasty, and was first prepared circa 1851.[1][2][4] Rugao
Rugao
ham is produced in a diverse variety of flavors, colors and weights.[1] The local breed of Jiangquhai pigs are typically used for the ham.[2] In contemporary times, it is produced in Rugao, Jiangsu province, which the ham is named after.[2][4][5] It is a well-known ham in China.[6] Per the Chinese calendar, Rugao
Rugao
ham is produced in the winter, whereby the curing process begins between November and December, and also in spring, between January and February.[4] See also[edit]China portal Food portalList of hamsChinese hamsAnfu ham Jinhua ham Xuanwei hamReferences[edit]^ a b c Isacs, John H. (January 16, 2014)
[...More...]

"Rugao Ham" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Black Forest Ham
Black Forest
Black Forest
ham, or Schwarzwälder Schinken in German, is a variety of dry-cured smoked ham, produced in the Black Forest
Black Forest
region of Germany. In 1959, Hans Adler from Bonndorf pioneere
[...More...]

"Black Forest Ham" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Smithfield Ham
Smithfield ham
Smithfield ham
is a specific form of country ham finish-cured in the town of Smithfield in Isle of Wight County in the Hampton Roads
Hampton Roads
region of Virginia, U.S.Contents1 History 2 Gallery 3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] The first
[...More...]

"Smithfield Ham" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.