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Hai Rui Dismissed From Office
Hai Rui
Hai Rui
Dismissed from Office (Chinese: 海瑞罢官; pinyin: Hǎi Ruì bà guān; Wade–Giles: Hai3 Jui4 Pa4-kuan1) is a theatre play notable for its involvement in Chinese politics during the Cultural Revolution.Contents1 Background 2 Political significance 3 Related work 4 References 5 BibliographyBackground[edit] Wu Han, who wrote the play, was a historian (and a municipal politician in Beijing) who focused on the Ming Dynasty. In 1959, Wu Han became interested in the life of Hai Rui, a Ming minister who was imprisoned for criticizing the emperor. Wu Han wrote several articles on his life and his fearless criticism of the emperor
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Simplified Chinese Characters
Simplified Chinese characters
Chinese characters
(简化字; jiǎnhuàzì)[1] are standardized Chinese characters
Chinese characters
prescribed in the Table of General Standard Chinese
Standard Chinese
Characters for use in mainland China. Along with traditional Chinese characters, they are one of the two standard character sets of the contemporary Chinese written language. The government of the People's Republic of China
People's Republic of China
in mainland China has promoted them for use in printing since the 1950s and 1960s to encourage literacy.[2] They are officially used in the People's Republic of China
Republic of China
and Singapore. Traditional Chinese
Traditional Chinese
characters are currently used in Hong Kong, Macau, and the Republic of China
Republic of China
(Taiwan)
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Peng Zhen
Peng Zhen (pronounced [pʰə̌ŋ ʈʂə́n]; October 12, 1902 – April 26, 1997) was a leading member of the Communist Party of China. He led the party organization in Beijing
Beijing
following the victory of the Communists in the Chinese Civil War
Chinese Civil War
in 1949, but was purged during the Cultural Revolution
Cultural Revolution
for opposing Mao's views on the role of literature in relation to the state. He was rehabilitated under Deng Xiaoping
Deng Xiaoping
in 1982 along with other 'wrongly accused' officials, and became the inaugural head of the CPC Central Political and Legislative Committee.Contents1 Biography 2 References 3 External links 4 Further readingBiography[edit] Born in Houma, Shanxi
Houma, Shanxi
province, Peng was originally named Fu Maogong (傅懋恭)
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Yang Chengwu
Yang Chengwu
Yang Chengwu
(simplified Chinese: 杨成武; traditional Chinese: 楊成武; pinyin: Yáng Chéngwǔ; October 27, 1914 – February 14, 2004), alias Yang Nengjun (Chinese: 杨能俊; pinyin: Yáng Néngjùn) was a Communist Chinese revolutionary and general of the People's Liberation Army.[1] He was the Deputy Chief of General Staff of the People's Liberation Army
People's Liberation Army
from 1954-1965 and 1974-1980. He was named Acting Chief of General Staff in 1966 after Luo Ruiqing
Luo Ruiqing
was purged at the beginning of the Cultural Revolution. Yang was born in Changting County, Fujian
Fujian
Province of China on October 8, 1914
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Wu Faxian
Wu Faxian
Wu Faxian
(Chinese: 吴法宪; 1915–2004) was a military and political leader of People's Republic of China. In 1930 he became a soldier of Chinese Workers' and Peasants' Red Army, two years later he joined the Communist Party of China. He participated in five Counter-Encirclement Campaigns, Long March, Battle of Pingxingguan, Liaoshen Campaign
Liaoshen Campaign
and Pingjin Campaign. In 1955 he was granted the military rank of lieutenant general. Wu was a subordinate of Lin Biao, in 1965 he became the commander of People's Liberation Army Air Force. In 1981 he was declared guilty as a member of the Lin Biao
Lin Biao
group, punished with a sentence of 17 years.[1] References[edit]^ 《中国大百科全书》总编委会编. 中国大百科全书 23. 北京市:中国大百科全书出版社, 2009.03. ISBN 9787500079583
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Xie Fuzhi
Xie Fuzhi (Chinese: 谢富治; pinyin: Xiè Fùzhì; Wade–Giles: Hsieh Fu-chih) (1909–1972) was a Communist Party of China
Communist Party of China
military commander, political commissar, and national security specialist. He was born in 1909 in Hong'an County, Hubei
Hubei
and died in Beijing
Beijing
in 1972. He was married to Liu Xiangping
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Tao Zhu
Tao Zhu
Tao Zhu
(simplified Chinese: 陶铸; traditional Chinese: 陶鑄; pinyin: Táo Zhù; Wade–Giles: T'ao Chu; 16 January 1908 – 30 November 1969) was a member of the Politburo Standing Committee
Politburo Standing Committee
of the Communist Party of China
Communist Party of China
. Biography[edit] Born in Qiyang, Hunan, Tao Zhu
Tao Zhu
was Secretary of the Guangdong Provincial Committee and Commander of the Guangzhou
Guangzhou
Military Region. He later became First Secretary of the Central-South region, and in 1965 was moved to Beijing
Beijing
to replace Lu Dingyi
Lu Dingyi
as Director of the Central Propaganda Department when Lu was purged for not adhering strongly to the Maoist line
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Zhou Enlai
Zhou Enlai
Zhou Enlai
(Chinese: 周恩来; Wade–Giles: Chou En-lai; 5 March 1898 – 8 January 1976) was the first Premier of the People's Republic of China, serving from October 1949 until his death in January 1976. Zhou served along with Chairman Mao Zedong
Mao Zedong
and was instrumental in the Communist Party's rise to power, and later in consolidating its control, forming foreign policy, and developing the Chinese economy. A skilled and able diplomat, Zhou served as the Chinese foreign minister from 1949 to 1958. Advocating peaceful coexistence with the West after the stalemated Korean War, he participated in the 1954 Geneva Conference and the 1955 Bandung
Bandung
Conference, and helped orchestrate Richard Nixon's 1972 visit to China
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Pinyin
Hanyu Pinyin
Hanyu Pinyin
Romanization
Romanization
(simplified Chinese: 汉语拼音; traditional Chinese: 漢語拼音), often abbreviated to pinyin, is the official romanization system for Standard Chinese
Standard Chinese
in mainland China
China
and to some extent in Taiwan. It is often used to teach Standard Mandarin Chinese, which is normally written using Chinese characters. The system includes four diacritics denoting tones. Pinyin
Pinyin
without tone marks is used to spell Chinese names and words in languages written with the Latin alphabet, and also in certain computer input methods to enter Chinese characters. The pinyin system was developed in the 1950s by many linguists, including Zhou Youguang,[1] based on earlier form romanizations of Chinese
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Amazon Standard Identification Number
The Amazon Standard Identification Number (ASIN) is a 10-character alphanumeric unique identifier assigned by Amazon.com
Amazon.com
and its partners for product identification within the Amazon organization.[1] Usage and structure[edit] Although ASINs used to be unique worldwide, global expansion has changed things so that ASINs are only guaranteed unique within a marketplace.[citation needed] The same product may be referred to by several ASINs though, and different national sites may use a different ASIN for the same product.[citation needed] In general, ASINs are likely to be different between the country sites unless they are for a class of product where the ASIN is based on an externally defined and internationally consistent identifier, such as ISBN
ISBN
for books.[citation needed] Each product sold on Amazon.com
Amazon.com
is given a unique ASIN
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Chen Zaidao
Chen Zaidao
Chen Zaidao
(simplified Chinese: 陈再道; traditional Chinese: 陳再道; pinyin: Chén Zàidào, 1909–1993) was a Chinese general in the People's Liberation Army, who commanded the Wuhan Military Region 1954-67
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Peking Opera
Peking opera, or Beijing
Beijing
opera (Chinese: 京剧; pinyin: Jīngjù), is a form of Chinese opera
Chinese opera
which combines music, vocal performance, mime, dance and acrobatics. It arose in the late 18th century and became fully developed and recognized by the mid-19th century.[1] The form was extremely popular in the Qing dynasty
Qing dynasty
court and has come to be regarded as one of the cultural treasures of China.[2] Major performance troupes are based in Beijing
Beijing
and Tianjin
Tianjin
in the north and Shanghai
Shanghai
in the south.[3] The art form is also preserved in Taiwan (Republic of China), where it is known as Guójù (traditional Chinese: 國劇; simplified Chinese: 国剧; "National theatre")
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Wu Han (historian)
Han
Han
may refer to:Contents1 East Asian history 2 Places 3 Arts, entertainnent, and media 4 People4.1 Ethnic groups 4.2 Name5 Education 6 Languages6.1 Writing systems7 Transportation 8 Other uses 9 See alsoEast Asian history[edit] Han (Western Zhou state) (韓) (11th century BC – 757 BC), a state during the Spring and Autumn period
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