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Hagiographic
A hagiography (/ˌhæɡiˈɒɡrəfi/; from Greek ἅγιος, hagios, meaning 'holy', and -γραφία, -graphia, meaning 'writing')[1] is a biography of a saint or an ecclesiastical leader. The term hagiography may be used to refer to the biography of a saint or highly developed spiritual being in any of the world's spiritual traditions. Christian
Christian
hagiographies focus on the lives, and notably the miracles, ascribed to men and women canonized by the Roman Catholic church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Oriental Orthodox churches, and the Church of the East
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Martin Of Tours
Saint Martin
Saint Martin
of Tours
Tours
(Latin: Sanctus Martinus Turonensis; 316 or 336 – 8 November 397) was Bishop of Tours, whose shrine in France
France
became a famous stopping-point for pilgrims on the road to Santiago de Compostela
Santiago de Compostela
in Spain. He has become one of the most familiar and recognizable Christian
Christian
saints, sometimes venerated as a military saint. As he was born in what is now Szombathely, Hungary, spent much of his childhood in Pavia, Italy, and lived most of his adult life in France, he is considered a spiritual bridge across Europe.[1] His life was recorded by a contemporary, the hagiographer Sulpicius Severus. Some of the accounts of his travels may have been interpolated into his vita to validate early sites of his cult
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Golden Legend
The Golden Legend
Golden Legend
(Latin: Legenda aurea or Legenda sanctorum) is a collection of hagiographies by Jacobus de Voragine
Jacobus de Voragine
that was widely read in late medieval Europe
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Martyr
A martyr (Greek: μάρτυς, mártys, "witness"; stem μάρτυρ-, mártyr-) is someone who suffers persecution and death for advocating, renouncing, refusing to renounce, or refusing to advocate a belief or cause as demanded by an external party. This refusal to comply with the presented demands results in the punishment or execution of the martyr by the oppressor. Originally applied only to those who suffered for their religious beliefs, the term has come to be used in connection with people imprisoned[citation needed] or killed for espousing a political cause. Most martyrs are considered holy or are respected by their followers, becoming symbols of exceptional leadership and heroism in the face of difficult circumstances
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Martyrology
A martyrology is a catalogue or list of martyrs and other saints and beati arranged in the calendar order of their anniversaries or feasts. Local martyrologies record exclusively the custom of a particular Church. Local lists were enriched by names borrowed from neighbouring churches.[1] Consolidation occurred, by the combination of several local martyrologies, with or without borrowings from literary sources. This is the now accepted meaning in the Latin Church
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Menaion
The Menaion
Menaion
(Greek: Μηναῖον; Slavonic: Минеѧ, Minéya, "of the month") is the liturgical book used by the Eastern Orthodox Church[note 1] containing the propers for fixed dates of the calendar year, i.e
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Adjective
In linguistics, an adjective (abbreviated adj) is a describing word, the main syntactic role of which is to qualify a noun or noun phrase, giving more information about the object signified.[1] Adjectives are one of the English parts of speech, although historically they were classed together with the nouns.[2] Certain words that were traditionally considered to be adjectives, including the, this, my, etc., are today usually classed separately, as determiners.Contents1 Etymology 2 Types of use 3 Distribution 4 Adverbs 5 Determiners 6 Adjective phrases 7 Other modifiers of nouns 8 Order 9 Comparison 10 Restrictiveness 11 Agreement 12 See also 13 References 14 Bibliography 15 External linksEtymology[edit] See also:
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Grammatical Gender
In linguistics, grammatical gender is a specific form of noun class system in which the division of noun classes forms an agreement system with another aspect of the language, such as adjectives, articles, pronouns, or verbs. This system is used in approximately one quarter of the world's languages. In these languages, most or all nouns inherently carry one value of the grammatical category called gender;[2] the values present in a given language (of which there are usually two or three) are called the genders of that language. According to one definition: "Genders are classes of nouns reflected in the behaviour of associated words."[3][4][5] Common gender divisions include masculine and feminine; masculine, feminine and neuter; or animate and inanimate
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Sermon
A sermon is an oration, lecture, or talk by a member of a religious institution or clergy. Sermons address a Biblical, theological, religious, or moral topic, usually expounding on a type of belief, law or behavior within both past and present contexts. Elements of the sermon often include exposition, exhortation and practical application. In Christianity, a sermon is usually delivered in a place of worship from an elevated architectural feature, variously known as a pulpit, a lectern, or an ambo. The word "sermon" comes from a Middle English word which was derived from Old French, which in turn came from the Latin word sermō meaning "discourse". The word can mean "conversation", which could mean that early sermons were delivered in the form of question and answer, and that only later did it come to mean a monologue
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Synaxarion
Synaxarion or Synexarion (plurals Synaxaria, Synexaria; Greek: Συναξάριον, from συνάγειν, synagein, "to bring together"; cf. etymology of synaxis and synagogue; Latin: Synaxarium, Synexarium; Coptic: ⲥϫⲛⲁⲝⲁⲣⲓⲟⲛ) is the name given in the Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox and Eastern Catholic Churches to a compilation of hagiographies corresponding roughly to the martyrology of the Roman Church. There are two kinds of synaxaria:[1]Simple synaxaria: lists of the saints arranged in the order of their anniversaries, e.g. the calendar of Morcelli[1] Historical synaxaria: including biographical notices, e.g
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Paterikon
Patericon or paterikon (Greek: πατερικόν), a short form for πατερικόν βιβλίον ("father's book", usually Lives of the Fathers in English), is a genre of Byzantine literature
Byzantine literature
of religious character, which were collections of sayings of saints, martyrs and hierarchs, and tales about them. Among the earliest collections of this kind are the Αποφθέγματα των άγίων γερόντων (Apophthegmata of Saint
Saint
Elders, also known as the Alphabetical Patericon, Apophthegmata Patrum, Sayings of the Fathers of the Desert (Sayings of the Desert Fathers) [1]), the Egyptian Paterikon (Historia Monachorum in Aegypto, History of Monks in Egypt) and Λαυσαϊχόν (Historia Lausiaca, [2]) by Palladius - of the 4th century
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Western Europe
Western Europe
Europe
is the region comprising the western part of Europe. Below, some different geographic, geopolitical and cultural definitions of the term are outlined. Significant historical events that have shaped the concept of Western Europe
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Jacob De Voragine
Jacopo De Fazio, best known as the blessed Jacobus da Varagine[1] (Italian: Giacomo da Varazze, Jacopo da Varazze; c. 1230 – July 13 or July 16, 1298) was an Italian chronicler and archbishop of Genoa. He was the author, or more accurately the compiler, of Legenda Aurea, the Golden Legend, a collection of the legendary lives of the greater saints of the medieval church that was one of the most popular religious works of the Middle Ages.[2]Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 Marian views 4 Notes 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksBiography[edit] Jacobus was born in Varagine[3] (Varazze), on the Ligurian coast between Savona
Savona
and Genoa. He entered the Dominican order in 1244, and became the prior at Como, Bologna
Bologna
and Asti
Asti
in succession.[4] Besides preaching with success in many parts of Italy, he also taught in the schools of his own fraternity
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Sulpicius Severus
Sulpicius Severus
Sulpicius Severus
(/sʌlˈpɪʃəs ˈsɛvərəs/; c. 363 – c. 425) was a Christian writer and native of Aquitania[1] in modern-day France. He is known for his chronicle of sacred history, as well as his biography of Saint Martin of Tours.Contents1 Life 2 Works2.1 Chronicle 2.2 Life of St. Martin, dialogues, and letters 2.3 Spurious attributions3 Sources 4 Bibliography 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksLife[edit] Almost all that we know of Severus' life comes from a few allusions in his own writings, some passages in the letters of his friend Paulinus, bishop of Nola,[1] and a short biography by the historian Gennadius of Massilia. Born of noble parents in Aquitaine, Severus enjoyed excellent educational advantages. He was imbued with the culture of his time and of his country, a center of Latin letters and learning
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Relic
In religion, a relic usually consists of the physical remains of a saint or the personal effects of the saint or venerated person preserved for purposes of veneration as a tangible memorial. Relics are an important aspect of some forms of Buddhism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Shamanism, and many other religions. Relic
Relic
derives from the Latin
Latin
reliquiae, meaning "remains", and a form of the Latin verb relinquere, to "leave behind, or abandon"
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Gniezno Doors
The Gniezno
Gniezno
Doors (Polish: Drzwi Gnieźnieńskie) are a pair of bronze doors at the entrance to Gniezno Cathedral
Gniezno Cathedral
in Gniezno, Poland, a Gothic building which the doors pre-date, having been carried over from an earlier building. They are decorated with eighteen scenes in bas-relief from the life of St. Adalbert, or Wojciech in Polish, whose remains had been bought for their weight in gold (shown in scene 16), and carried back to the cathedral and set up in a shrine there.[1][2] They were made in about 1175 during the reign of Mieszko III the Old and are one of the most significant works of Romanesque art
Romanesque art
in Poland.Contents1 Placing the origin of the doors 2 Description 3 Subjects of the panels 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksPlacing the origin of the doors[edit] Locating the origin of the doors has been the subject of much discussion
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