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Hachijō-jima
Hachijō-jima
Hachijō-jima
(八丈島) is a volcanic Japanese island in the Philippine Sea. It is about 287 kilometres (178 mi) south of the special wards of Tokyo, to which it belongs. It is part of the Izu archipelago and within the Fuji-Hakone-Izu National Park. Its only municipality is Hachijō. On 1 March 2018, its population was 7,522 people living on 63 km2. The Hachijō language is spoken by some inhabitants, but it is considered an endangered language and the number of speakers is unknown. The island has been inhabited since the Jōmon period, and was used as a place of exile during the Edo period. In modern times, it has been used for farming sugarcane and housing a secret submarine base during World War II; it is now a tourist destination within Japan. Hachijō-jima
Hachijō-jima
receives about 3,000 millimetres (120 in) of precipitation annually
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Prefectures Of Japan
Japan
Japan
is divided into 47 prefectures (都道府県, Todōfuken), forming the first level of jurisdiction and administrative division. They consist of 43 prefectures (県, ken) proper, two urban prefectures (府, fu, Osaka
Osaka
and Kyoto), one "circuit" or "territory" (道, dō, Hokkaido) and one "metropolis" (都, to, Tokyo). The Meiji Fuhanken sanchisei
Fuhanken sanchisei
administration created the first prefectures (urban -fu and rural -ken) from 1868 to replace the urban and rural administrators (bugyō, daikan, etc.) in the parts of the country previously controlled directly by the shogunate and a few territories of rebels/shogunate loyalists who had not submitted to the new government such as Aizu/Wakamatsu. In 1871, all remaining feudal domains (han) were also transformed into prefectures, so that prefectures subdivided the whole country
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Green Sea Turtle
The green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas), also known as the green turtle, black (sea) turtle or Pacific green turtle,[3] is a large sea turtle of the family Cheloniidae. It is the only species in the genus Chelonia.[4] Its range extends throughout tropical and subtropical seas around the world, with two distinct populations in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, but it is also found in the Indian Ocean.[5][6] The common name comes from the usually green fat found beneath its carapace[citation needed]; these turtles' shells are olive to black. This sea turtle's dorsoventrally flattened body is covered by a large, teardrop-shaped carapace; it has a pair of large, paddle-like flippers. It is usually lightly colored, although in the eastern Pacific populations parts of the carapace can be almost black. Unlike other members of its family, such as the hawksbill sea turtle, C. mydas is mostly herbivorous
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Lists Of Endangered Languages
The following lists of endangered languages are mainly based on the definitions used by UNESCO. In order to be listed, a language must be classified as "endangered" in a cited academic source. Researchers have concluded that in less than one hundred years, almost half of the languages known today will be lost forever
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Bonin Islands
The Bonin Islands, also known as the Ogasawara Islands (小笠原群島, Ogasawara Guntō),[1] are an archipelago of over 30 subtropical and tropical islands, some 1,000 kilometres (540 nmi; 620 mi) directly south of Tokyo, Japan. The name "Bonin Islands" comes from the Japanese word bunin (an archaic reading of 無人 mujin), meaning "no people" or "uninhabited". The only inhabited islands of the group are Chichijima
Chichijima
(父島), the seat of the municipal government, and Hahajima
Hahajima
(母島), which includes Ogasawara Village. Ogasawara Municipality (mura) and Ogasawara Subprefecture
Ogasawara Subprefecture
take their names from the Ogasawara Group. Ogasawara Archipelago (小笠原諸島, Ogasawara shotō) is also used as a wider collective term that includes other islands in Ogasawara Municipality, such as the Volcano Islands, along with other small, uninhabited and isolated islands
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Tokyo University Of Marine Science And Technology
Tokyo
Tokyo
University of Marine Science and Technology (東京海洋大学, Tōkyō Kaiyō Daigaku), abbreviated as Kaiyodai (海洋大, Kaiyōdai), is a national university in Japan
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Whale Watching
Whale
Whale
watching is the practice of observing whales and dolphins (cetaceans) in their natural habitat. Whale
Whale
watching is mostly a recreational activity (cf. birdwatching), but it can also serve scientific and/or educational purposes.[1] A study prepared for IFAW in 2009 estimated that 13 million people went whale watching globally in 2008
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Indo-Pacific Bottlenose Dolphin
Delphinus aduncus Ehrenberg, 1833The Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin
Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin
(Tursiops aduncus) is a species of bottlenose dolphin. This dolphin grows to 2.6 m (8.5 ft) long, and weighs up to 230 kg (510 lb).[3] It lives in the waters around India, northern Australia, South China, the Red Sea, and the eastern coast of Africa.[3] Its back is dark grey and its belly is lighter grey or nearly white with grey spots.[3] Until 1998, all bottlenose dolphins were considered members of the single species T. truncatus
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False Killer Whale
The false killer whale (Pseudorca crassidens) is the fourth-largest dolphin, a member of the oceanic dolphins. It lives in temperate and tropical waters throughout the world. As its name implies, the false killer whale shares characteristics with the more widely known killer whale (Orcinus orca), though the species belong to different genera within Delphinidae; as well as similarities in appearance, both species attack and kill other marine mammals
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Sperm Whale
Physeter catodon Linnaeus, 1758 Physeter australasianus Desmoulins, 1822The sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) or cachalot /ˈkæʃəˌlɒt, ˈkæʃəˌloʊ/ is the largest of the toothed whales and the largest toothed predator. It is the only living member of genus Physeter and one of three extant species in the sperm whale family, along with the pygmy sperm whale and dwarf sperm whale of the genus Kogia. The sperm whale is a pelagic mammal with a worldwide range, and will migrate seasonally for feeding and breeding.[3] Females and young males live together in groups while mature males live solitary lives outside of the mating season. The females cooperate to protect and nurse their young. Females give birth every four to twenty years, and care for the calves for more than a decade
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Orca
Orca
Orca
gladiatorThe killer whale or orca ( Orcinus
Orcinus
orca) is a toothed whale belonging to the oceanic dolphin family, of which it is the largest member. Killer whales have a diverse diet, although individual populations often specialize in particular types of prey. Some feed exclusively on fish, while others hunt marine mammals such as seals and dolphins. They have been known to attack baleen whale calves, and even adult whales. Killer whales are apex predators, as there is no animal that preys on them
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Bioluminescent
Bioluminescence
Bioluminescence
is the production and emission of light by a living organism. It is a form of chemiluminescence. Bioluminescence
Bioluminescence
occurs widely in marine vertebrates and invertebrates, as well as in some fungi, microorganisms including some bioluminescent bacteria and terrestrial invertebrates such as fireflies. In some animals, the light is bacteriogenic, produced by symbiotic organisms such as Vibrio bacteria; in others, it is autogenic, produced by the animals themselves. In a general sense, the principal chemical reaction in bioluminescence involves some light-emitting molecule and an enzyme, generally called the luciferin and the luciferase, respectively. Because these are generic names, the luciferins and luciferases are often distinguished by including the species or group, i.e. Firefly
Firefly
luciferin
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Mikura-jima
Mikura-jima (御蔵島) is a volcanic Japanese island in the Pacific Ocean.[1] The island is administered by Tōkyō Metropolis and located approximately 200 kilometres (120 mi) south of Tokyo and 19 kilometres (12 mi) south-southeast of Miyake-jima. It is one of the Izu Seven Islands group of the seven northern islands of the Izu archipelago. Mikurajima is administratively part of Mikurajima Village under Miyake Subprefecture of Tokyo Metropolis. As of 2009[update], the island's population was 351. Mikura-jima is also within the boundaries of the Fuji-Hakone-Izu National Park.Contents1 History 2 Geology, wildlife, and economics 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The island has apparently been inhabited for thousands of years, but existing records only extend to the Edo period
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Izu Thrush
The Izu thrush or Izu Islands thrush (Turdus celaenops) is a thrush native to the Izu and Ryukyu Islands of Japan, in particular, Hachijojima, Mikurajima, and Miyakejima in the former chain, and Yakushima and the Tokara Islands in the latter. This species is absent from the main islands of Japan, and due to its limited range, is listed in the IUCN Red List as Vulnerable. Reaching a length of approximately 23 cm, the Izu thrush has a distinctive dark plumage, with a black head and tail contrasting with yellow eye-ring and bill, chestnut brown wings, and a rust-red belly. This color pattern often elicits comparisons to the American robin. References[edit]^ BirdLife International (2012). "Turdus celaenops". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature
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Japanese White-eye
The Japanese white-eye
Japanese white-eye
( Zosterops
Zosterops
japonicus), also known as the mejiro (メジロ, 目白), is a small passerine bird in the white-eye family. The specific epithet is occasionally written japonica, but this is incorrect due to the gender of the genus. Its native range includes much of east Asia, including Japan, Korea, China, Vietnam, Taiwan, and the Philippines. It has been intentionally introduced to other parts of the world as a pet and as pest control, with mixed results
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Cheilopogon Pinnatibarbatus Japonicus
Cheilopogon pinnatibarbatus japonicus is a subspecies of flyingfish of the family Exocoetidae, found in the seas around Japan. Its length is up to 50 cm. References[edit]Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2007). Cheilopogon pinnatibarbatus japonicus in FishBase. April 2007 version.Taxon identifiersWd: Q5089676 EoL: 1261694 FishBase: 12987 GBIF: 5722940 NCBI: 291359 WoRMS: 293564This order beloniformes related article is a stub
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