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Haae A Mahi
Haʻae was a High Chief (Aliʻi) of the island of Hawaiʻi. He was a son of the Chiefess Kalanikauleleiaiwi[1][2] and her husband Kauaua-a-Mahi, son of Mahiolole, the great Kohala chief of the Mahi family. He had a brother called Alapainui ("Alapai the Great") and sister Kekuiapoiwa I who became a queen of Maui.[3] He was an uncle of the king Kahekili II of Maui
Maui
and Chief Keōua of Hawaii. His wife was his half-sister Kekelakekeokalani
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Aliʻi
Aliʻi is a word in the Hawaiian language
Hawaiian language
that refers to the hereditary line of rulers, the noho ali'i, of the Hawaiian Islands. Ali'i is also a word with a similar meaning in the Samoan language
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Kepookalani
Kamanawa
Kamanawa
II Kapelakapuokakae ʻAikanaka Kalailua, PiʻianaiʻaFather KameʻeiamokuMother KamakaʻeheikuliKepoʻokalani was a High Chief during the founding of the Kingdom of Hawaii. Two of his grandchildren would marry each other, and two of his great-grandchildren would be the last two ruling monarchs of the Kingdom. Life[edit] Kepookalani was born around 1760. His mother was Kamakaʻeheikuli and father was Kameʻeiamoku. He was half-cousin of Kamehameha I, and named after the only full brother of Kamehameha usually called Keliimaikai or Keapo o Kepoʻokalani
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Abraham Fornander
Abraham Fornander
Abraham Fornander
(November 4, 1812 – November 1, 1887) was a Swedish-born emigrant who became an important Hawaiian journalist, judge, and ethnologist.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Whaling career 3 Hawaii3.1 Journalism 3.2 Life as a public official 3.3 Account of the Polynesian Race 3.4 Later life4 Impact and influence 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Fornander was born in Öland, Sweden on November 4, 1812, to Anders (1778–1828) and Karin Fornander (1788–1872). His education was under his father, a local clergyman, except for two years in 1822 and 1823 when he attended gymnasium in Kalmar, studying Latin, Greek, and Hebrew. His mother's surname was spelled Foenander, so his surname is sometimes spelled that way.[1] In 1828, Fornander began his university studies at the University of Uppsala where he studied theology, transferring to the University of Lund in 1830
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Liliuokalani
Liliʻuokalani
Liliʻuokalani
(Hawaiian pronunciation: [liliˌʔuokəˈlɐni]; born Lydia Liliʻu Loloku Walania Kamakaʻeha; September 2, 1838 – November 11, 1917) was the first queen and last monarch of the Kingdom of Hawaii, ruling from January 29, 1891, until the overthrow of the Kingdom of Hawaii
Kingdom of Hawaii
on January 17, 1893. The composer of "Aloha ʻOe" and numerous other works, she wrote her autobiography Hawaii's Story by Hawaii's Queen during her imprisonment following the overthrow. Liliʻuokalani
Liliʻuokalani
was born on September 2, 1838, in Honolulu, on the island of Oʻahu. While her natural parents were Analea Keohokālole and Caesar Kapaʻakea, she was hānai (informally adopted) at birth by Abner Pākī
Abner Pākī
and Laura Kōnia
Laura Kōnia
and raised with their daughter Bernice Pauahi Bishop
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Kalākaua
Kalākaua
Kalākaua
(November 16, 1836 – January 20, 1891), born David Laʻamea Kamananakapu Mahinulani Naloiaehuokalani Lumialani Kalākaua[2] and sometimes called The Merrie Monarch, was the last king and penultimate monarch of the Kingdom of Hawaiʻi. Succeeding Lunalilo, he was the last elected monarch of Hawaii. He reigned from February 12, 1874 until his death in San Francisco, California, on January 20, 1891. Kalākaua
Kalākaua
had a convivial personality and enjoyed entertaining guests with his singing and ukulele playing. At his coronation and his birthday jubilee, the hula that had been banned from public in the kingdom[3] became a celebration of Hawaiian culture. During his reign, the Reciprocity Treaty of 1875
Reciprocity Treaty of 1875
brought great prosperity to the kingdom
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Kamehameha V
Kamehameha V
Kamehameha V
(1830–1872), born as Lot Kapuāiwa, reigned as the fifth monarch of the Kingdom of Hawaiʻi from 1863 to 1872. His motto was "Onipaʻa": immovable, firm, steadfast or determined; he worked diligently for his people and kingdom and was described as the last great traditional chief.[2] His full Hawaiian name prior to his succession was Lota Kapuāiwa Kalanimakua Aliʻiōlani Kalanikupuapaʻīkalaninui.[3]Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 New constitution and new laws 4 Growth in travel to Hawaii 5 Succession 6 Legacy 7 References 8 Bibliography 9 Further reading 10 External linksEarly life[edit]Prince Lot Kapuāiwa, traveling abroad in 1850.He was born and given the name Lot Kapuāiwa December 11, 1830. His mother was Elizabeth Kīnaʻu
Kīnaʻu
and father was Mataio Kekūanāoʻa
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Kamehameha IV
Kamehameha IV, born Alexander ʻIolani Liholiho (February 9, 1834 – November 30, 1863) reigned as the fourth monarch of Hawaii under the title: Ke Aliʻi o ko Hawaiʻi Pae ʻAina of the Kingdom of Hawaii from January 11, 1855 to November 30, 1863. His full Hawaiian name was Alekanetero ʻIolani Kalanikualiholiho Maka o ʻIouli Kūnuiākea o Kūkāʻilimoku.Contents1 Early life1.1 Education
Education
and Travel2 Succession 3 Reign 4 Resisting American influence 5 Legacy 6 End of reign 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksEarly life[edit]Prince Alexander Liholiho wearing leis.Alexander was born on February 9, 1834 in Honolulu
Honolulu
on the island of Oʻahu. His father was High Chief Mataio Kekūanāoʻa, Royal Governor of Oʻahu. His mother was Princess Elizabeth Kīnaʻu
Kīnaʻu
the Kuhina Nui or Prime Minister of the Kingdom. He was the grandson of all the islands
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Lunalilo
Lunalilo, born William Charles Lunalilo
Lunalilo
(January 31, 1835 – February 3, 1874), was the sixth monarch of the Hawaiʻi from January 8, 1873 until February 3, 1874. Due to his popularity and status as Hawaii's first elected monarch, he became known as "The People's King".Contents1 Early life 2 Prospective royal brides 3 Election 4 Reign as King 5 Illness and death 6 Legacy 7 Family tree 8 References 9 Bibliography 10 External linksEarly life[edit] Lunalilo
Lunalilo
as a teenager.William Charles Lunalilo
Lunalilo
was born on January 31, 1835 in a two-story house made of coral brick, an area known as Pohukaina, now part the grounds of the ʻIolani Palace
ʻIolani Palace
in Honolulu. His mother was High Chiefess Miriam Auhea Kekāuluohi
Kekāuluohi
(later styled as Kaʻahumanu
Kaʻahumanu
III) and his father was High Chief Charles Kanaʻina
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Keohokālole
Analea Keohokālole
Keohokālole
(1816–1869) was a Hawaiian chiefess and matriarch of the House of Kalākaua
Kalākaua
that ruled the Kingdom of Hawaiʻi from 1874 to 1893. Her Hawaiian name Keohokālole
Keohokālole
means "the straight hair of her own father's tresses" and was given to her at birth by Queen Kaʻahumanu.[2] Life[edit] Keohokālole
Keohokālole
was born at Kailua-Kona, Hawaii
Kailua-Kona, Hawaii
in 1816. She was daughter of the High Chiefess Kamaeokalani and the High Chief ʻAikanaka. Through her father she was descended from Kame'eiamoku
Kame'eiamoku
and Keawe-a-Heulu two of the four Kona chiefs that supported Kamehameha I.KeohokāloleIn 1833 she married Caesar Kapaʻakea, a chief of lesser rank and her first cousin. Their union produced more than ten children
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Kīnaʻu
Princess Kalani Ahumanu i Kaliko o Iwi Kauhipua o Kīnaʻu, also known as Elizabeth Kīnaʻu
Kīnaʻu
(c. 1805 – April 4, 1839) was Kuhina Nui
Kuhina Nui
of the Kingdom of Hawaiʻi as Kaʻahumanu
Kaʻahumanu
II,[3]:436 Queen regent and Dowager Queen.Contents1 Life 2 Family tree 3 References 4 BibliographyLife[edit] Her father was King Kamehameha I
Kamehameha I
and her mother was Kalākua Kaheiheimālie. She was born probably in 1805 on the island of Oʻahu at Waikiki. She was given in hānai to her stepmother Peleuli
Peleuli
and her second husband Kawelookalani, her father's half-brother
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Kekāuluohi
Miriam Auhea Kalani Kui Kawakiu o Kekāuluohi
Kekāuluohi
Kealiʻiuhiwaihanau o Kalani Makahonua Ahilapalapa Kai Wikapu o Kaleilei a Kalakua also known as Kaʻahumanu III[1]:230 (July 27, 1794 – June 7, 1845), was Kuhina Nui
Kuhina Nui
of the Kingdom of Hawaii, a queen consort of both King Kamehameha I
Kamehameha I
and Kamehameha II, and mother of another king. In Hawaiian, her name Kekāuluohi
Kekāuluohi
means the vine growing with shoots
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Kameʻeiamoku
Kameʻeiamoku
Kameʻeiamoku
(died 1802) was a Hawaiian high chief and the Counselor of State to King Kamehameha I. He was called Kamehameha's uncle, but he was really the cousin of Kamehameha's mother, Kekuiapoiwa II.Contents1 Life1.1 Family2 Legacy 3 References 4 External linksLife[edit] Family[edit] Along with his twin brother Kamanawa, Kameʻeiamoku's father was Chief Keawepoepoe.[1] His mother was Kanoena, also Keawepoepoe's sister. Because their parents were siblings, Kameʻeiamoku
Kameʻeiamoku
and Kamanawa
Kamanawa
were known as nīʻaupiʻo, the offspring of a royal brother and sister. His grandmother was Princess Kalanikauleleiaiwi of Hawaiʻi, who was also the grandmother of Keōua Nui (Kamehameha's father), making the twins cousins once removed of Kamehameha
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Hawaii (island)
HawaiiSymbolsFlower Red Pua Lehua ('Ohi'a blossom)[2]Color ʻUlaʻula (red)Largest settlement HiloDemographicsPopulation 185,079 (2010)Pop. density 46 /sq mi (17.8 /km2)Hawaiʻi (English: /həˈwaɪ.i, -ji, -ʔi/ ( listen) hə-WY-(y)ee; Hawaiian: [həˈvɐjʔi]) is the largest island located in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Hawaii. It is the largest and the southeastern-most of the Hawaiian Islands, a chain of volcanic islands in the North Pacific Ocean. With an area of 4,028 square miles (10,430 km2), it has 63% of the Hawaiian archipelago's combined landmass, and is the largest island in the United States. However, it has only 13% of Hawaiʻi’s people
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Kamehameha III
Kamehameha III
Kamehameha III
(born Kauikeaouli) (March 17, 1814 – December 15, 1854) was the third king of the Kingdom of Hawaii
Kingdom of Hawaii
from 1825 to 1854. His full Hawaiian name was Keaweaweʻula Kīwalaʻō
Kīwalaʻō
Kauikeaouli Kaleiopapa and then lengthened to Keaweaweʻula Kīwalaʻō Kauikeaouli Kaleiopapa Kalani Waiakua Kalanikau Iokikilo Kīwalaʻō
Kīwalaʻō
i ke kapu Kamehameha when he ascended the throne. Under his reign Hawaii evolved from an absolute monarchy to a constitutional monarchy with the signing of both the 1840 Constitution, which was the first Hawaiian Language Constitution, and the 1852 Constitution
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