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HMS Resolution
Several ships of the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
have borne the name HMS Resolution. However, the first English warship to bear the name Resolution was actually the first rate Prince Royal (built in 1610 and rebuilt in 1641), which was renamed Resolution in 1650 following the inauguration of the Commonwealth, and continued to bear that name until 1660, when the name Prince Royal was restored
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Willem Van De Velde, The Younger
Willem van de Velde the Younger (bapt. 18 December 1633; died 6 April 1707) was a Dutch marine painter.Contents1 Biography 2 Works2.1 Gallery3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Willem van de Velde was baptised on 18 December 1633 in Leiden, Holland, Dutch Republic. A son of Willem van de Velde the Elder, also a painter of sea-pieces, Willem van de Velde, the younger, was instructed by his father, and afterwards by Simon de Vlieger, a marine painter of repute at the time, and had achieved great celebrity by his art before he came to London. By 1673 he had moved to England, where he was engaged by Charles II, at a salary of £100, to aid his father in "taking and making draughts of sea-fights", his part of the work being to reproduce in color the drawings of the elder Van de Velde
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Hoy (ship)
A hoy was a small sloop-rigged coasting ship or a heavy barge used for freight, usually with a burthen of about 60 tons (bm). The word derives from the Middle Dutch hoey. In 1495, one of the Paston Letters included the phrase, An hoye of Dorderycht (a hoy of Dordrecht), in such a way as to indicate that such contact was then no more than mildly unusual. The English term was first used on the Dutch Heude-ships that entered service with the British Royal Navy.Contents1 Evolution and use 2 Royal Navy 3 See also 4 Footnotes 5 References 6 GalleryEvolution and use[edit]A Scene on board a Margate Hoy as described by Dibden (caricature), 1804, National Maritime Museum, GreenwichOver time the hoy evolved in terms of its design and use. In the fifteenth century a hoy might be a small spritsail-rigged warship like a cromster
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Ballistic Missile
A ballistic missile follows a ballistic trajectory to deliver one or more warheads on a predetermined target. These weapons are only guided during relatively brief periods of flight—most of their trajectory is unpowered, being governed by gravity and air resistance if in the atmosphere. Shorter range ballistic missiles stay within the Earth's atmosphere, while longer-ranged intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs), are launched on a sub-orbital flight trajectory and spend most of their flight out of the atmosphere These weapons are in a distinct category from cruise missiles, which are aerodynamically guided in powered flight.Contents1 History 2 Flight 3 Advantages 4 Missile
Missile
types 5 Throw-weight5.1 Depressed trajectory6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksHistory[edit]Replica of V-2The earliest use of rockets as a weapon dates to the 13th Century (see History of rockets)
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Submarine
A submarine (or simply sub) is a watercraft capable of independent operation underwater. It differs from a submersible, which has more limited underwater capability. The term most commonly refers to a large, crewed vessel. It is also sometimes used historically or colloquially to refer to remotely operated vehicles and robots, as well as medium-sized or smaller vessels, such as the midget submarine and the wet sub. The noun submarine evolved as a shortened form of submarine boat;[1] by naval tradition, submarines are usually referred to as "boats" rather than as "ships", regardless of their size (boat is usually reserved for seagoing vessels of relatively small size). Although experimental submarines had been built before, submarine design took off during the 19th century, and they were adopted by several navies. Submarines were first widely used during World War I (1914–1918), and now figure in many navies large and small
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Great Siege Of Gibraltar
 Great Britain Hanover Spain  FranceCommanders and leaders George Augustus Eliott Roger Curtis[3] August de la Motte Duc de Crillon Martín Álvarez de Sotomayor[4] Luis de Córdova y Córdova Antonio Barceló[3]StrengthJune 1779: 5,382 men;[5] September 1782: 7,500[6](including 500 gunners)[7] men 96 guns 12 gunboats[8] Total: 7,500 June 1779: 13,749 men[9] September 1782: 33,000[10]-35,000 soldiers[11] 30,000 sailors & marines[12] 114 land guns & mortars[13]; 47 ships of the line,[11] 10 floating batteries 7 xebecs & 40 gunboats[9] Total: 65,000Casualties and losses333 killed 911 wounded 536 died from disease.[14][15] Total: 1,781 6,000 killed, wounded, captured & missing,[16] unknown to disease 10 ships sunk, 1 ship of the line captured[17]v t eAnglo-Spanish War 1779–1783Europe & AtlanticEnglish Channel Gibraltar Azores Lisbon 20 November 1779 Cape Finisterre St. Vincent Cape St
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HMS Brilliant (1779)
HMS Brilliant was a 28-gun Enterprise-class sixth-rate frigate of the Royal Navy. Brilliant was first commissioned in July 1779 under the command of Captain John Ford.Contents1 American Revolution 2 French Revolutionary Wars 3 Napoleonic Wars 4 Fate 5 Citations 6 ReferencesAmerican Revolution[edit] Brilliant was stationed at Gibraltar during the Great Siege. In June 1782 the garrison there launched 12 gunboats. Each was armed with an 18-pounder gun, and received a crew of 21 men drawn from Royal Navy vessels stationed at Gibraltar. Brilliant provided crews for six: Defiance, Dreadnought, Resolution, Revenge, Spitfire, and Thunder.[1] On 13 and 14 September and 11 October, the garrison destroyed a number of floating batteries
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Sir Peter Halkett, 6th Baronet
Admiral
Admiral
Sir Peter Halkett, 6th Baronet
Baronet
(c. 1765 – 7 October 1839) was a senior Royal Navy
Royal Navy
officer of the early nineteenth century who is best known for his service in the French Revolutionary Wars. The younger son a Scottish baronet, Halkett joined the Navy and by 1793 was a lieutenant, becoming a post captain after service at the Siege of Williamstadt in the Netherlands. He later commanded the frigate HMS Circe during the Battle of Camperdown
Battle of Camperdown
in 1797 and later achieved success in the Caribbean in command of HMS Apollo. He was made a rear-admiral in 1812, but his first major command was in the West Indies in 1836, lasting two years
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HMS Apollo (1799)
HMS Apollo, the fourth ship of the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
to be named for the Greek god Apollo, was a fifth-rate frigate of a nominal 36 guns. She was the name ship of the Apollo-class frigates. Apollo
Apollo
was launched in 1799, and wrecked with heavy loss of life in 1804.Contents1 French Revolutionary Wars 2 Napoleonic Wars 3 Fate 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksFrench Revolutionary Wars[edit] Apollo
Apollo
was built at Deptford Wharf
Deptford Wharf
in 1799, taking her name from the fifth-rate Apollo, which had been wrecked off Holland
Holland
in January
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Royal New Zealand Navy
Personnel:2,050 Regular 392 Reserve 108 Civilian StaffShips:2 Frigates 6 Patrol boats 1 Strategic sealift shipAircraft:8 HelicoptersPart of New Zealand
New Zealand
Defence ForceGarrison/HQ Devonport Naval BaseMotto(s) Te Taua Moana o Aotearoa, "Warriors of the Sea of New Zealand")MarchQuick — Heart of Oak Slow — E Pari RaMascot(s) AnchorAnniversaries 1 October 1941 (founded)Engagements World War II Korean War Malayan Emergency Cross border attacks in Sabah Indonesia–Malaysia confrontation Iran–Iraq War Gulf War Solomon
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Royal Navy
The Royal Navy
Navy
(RN) is the United Kingdom's naval warfare force. Although warships were used by the English kings from the early medieval period, the first major maritime engagements were fought in the Hundred Years War
Hundred Years War
against the Kingdom of France. The modern Royal Navy
Navy
traces its origins to the early 16th century; the oldest of the UK's armed services, it is known as the Senior Service. From the middle decades of the 17th century, and through the 18th century, the Royal Navy
Navy
vied with the Dutch Navy
Navy
and later with the French Navy
Navy
for maritime supremacy. From the mid 18th century, it was the world's most powerful navy until surpassed by the United States Navy
Navy
during the Second World War
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The London Gazette
The London Gazette
The London Gazette
is one of the official journals of record of the British government, and the most important among such official journals in the United Kingdom, in which certain statutory notices are required to be published. The London Gazette
The London Gazette
claims to be the oldest surviving English newspaper and the oldest continuously published newspaper in the UK, having been first published on 7 November 1665 as The Oxford
Oxford
Gazette.[a][2] This claim is also made by the Stamford Mercury and Berrow's Worcester Journal, because The Gazette is not a conventional newspaper offering general news coverage
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J. J. Colledge
James Joseph Colledge (1908 – 26 April 1997)[1] was a British naval historian, author of Ships of the Royal Navy, the standard work on the fighting ships of the British Royal Navy
Royal Navy
from the 15th century to the 20th century. He also wrote Warships of World War II with Henry Trevor Lenton, listing Royal and Commonwealth warships. References[edit]^ World Ship Society obituary Archived 2011-09-30 at the Wayback Machine.External links[edit]Works by or about J. J. Colledge in libraries ( WorldCat
WorldCat
catalog)Authority control WorldCat
WorldCat
Identities VIAF: 62789134 ISNI: 0000 0000 6331 3777This article about a British historian or genealogist is a stub
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Ships Of The Royal Navy
Ships of the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
is a naval history reference work by J. J. Colledge (1908-1997); it provides brief entries on all recorded ships in commission in the British Royal Navy
Royal Navy
from the 15th century, giving location of constructions, date of launch, tonnage, specification and fate. It was published in two volumes by Greenhill Books. Volume 1, first published in 1969, covers major ships; Volume 2, first published in 1970, covers Navy-built trawlers, drifters, tugs and requisitioned ships including Armed Merchant Cruisers. The book is the standard single-volume reference work on ships of the Royal Navy, and Colledge's conventions and spellings of names are used by museums, libraries and archives. For more data on the ships of the pre-1863 British Navy, see British Warships in the Age of Sail. A revised third version of the Volume 1 work was published in 2003 which added the ships of the late 20th century
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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