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HDR10
High-dynamic-range video
High-dynamic-range video
(HDR video) describes video having a dynamic range greater than that of standard-dynamic-range video (SDR video), which uses a conventional gamma curve.[1] SDR video, when using a conventional gamma curve and a bit depth of 8-bits per sample, has a dynamic range of about 6 stops (26=64:1).[1] When HDR content is displayed on a 2,000 cd/m2 display with a bit depth of 10-bits per sample it has a dynamic range of 200,000:1 or 17.6 stops,[1] a range not offered by the majority of current displays.[1]Contents1 Technology1.1 Capture 1.2 Display 1.3 Production2 Standards2.1 Perceptual Quantizer 2.2 HDR10 2.3 HDR10+ 2.4 Dolby Vision 2.5 Hybrid Log-Gamma 2.6 SL-HDR13 Guidelines and recommendations3.1 ITU-R Rec
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Dynamic Range
Dynamic range, abbreviated DR, DNR,[1] or DYR[2] is the ratio between the largest and smallest values that a certain quantity can assume. It is often used in the context of signals, like sound and light
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Academy Color Encoding System
The Academy Color Encoding System (ACES) is a color image encoding system created by hundreds of industry professionals under the auspices of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. ACES allows for a fully encompassing color accurate workflow, with "seamless interchange of high quality motion picture images regardless of source".[1] The system defines its own color primaries that completely encompass the visible spectral locus as defined by the CIE xyY specification. The white point is approximate to the CIE D60 standard illuminant, and ACES compliant files are encoded in 16-bit half-floats, thus allowing ACES OpenEXR files to encode 30 stops of scene information.[1] ACES supports both high dynamic range (HDR) and wide color gamut (WCG).[1] The version 1.0 release occurred in December 2014, and has been implemented by multiple vendors, and used on multiple motion pictures and television shows
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Field Emission Display
A field-emission display (FED) is a flat panel display technology that uses large-area field electron emission sources to provide electrons that strike colored phosphor to produce a color image. In a general sense, an FED consists of a matrix of cathode ray tubes, each tube producing a single sub-pixel, grouped in threes to form red-green-blue (RGB) pixels. FEDs combine the advantages of CRTs, namely their high contrast levels and very fast response times, with the packaging advantages of LCD
LCD
and other flat-panel technologies
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Standard-dynamic-range Video
Standard-dynamic-range video describes images/rendering/video using a conventional gamma curve, and therefore presenting a dynamic range that is considered standard, as opposed to high-dynamic-range video.[1] The conventional gamma curve was based on the limits of the cathode ray tube (CRT) which allows for a maximum luminance of 100 cd/m2.[2][3] The first CRT television sets were manufactured in 1934 and the first color CRT television sets were manufactured in 1954.[4][5]Contents1 Technical details 2 Limitations 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksTechnical details[edit] The dynamic range that can be perceived by the human eye in a single image is around 14 stops.[1] SDR video with a conventional gamma curve and a bit depth of 8-bits per sample has a dynamic range of about 6 stops.[1] Professional SDR video with a bit depth of 10-bits per sample has a dynamic range of about 10 stops.[1] Conventional gamma curves include Rec. 601 and Rec
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Television Set
A television set, more commonly called a television, TV, TV set, television receiver, or telly, is a device that combines a tuner, display, and loudspeakers for the purpose of viewing television. Introduced in the late 1920s in mechanical form, television sets became a popular consumer product after World War II
World War II
in electronic form, using cathode ray tubes. The addition of color to broadcast television after 1953 further increased the popularity of television sets in the 1960s, and an outdoor antenna became a common feature of suburban homes. The ubiquitous television set became the display device for the first recorded media in the 1970s, such as Betamax, VHS and later DVD. It was also the display device for the first generation of home computers (e.g., Timex Sinclair 1000) and video game consoles (e.g., Atari) in the 1980s
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Low-dynamic-range Rendering
High-dynamic-range rendering (HDRR or HDR rendering), also known as high-dynamic-range lighting, is the rendering of computer graphics scenes by using lighting calculations done in high dynamic range (HDR). This allows preservation of details that may be lost due to limiting contrast ratios
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Tone Mapping
Tone mapping is a technique used in image processing and computer graphics to map one set of colors to another to approximate the appearance of high-dynamic-range images in a medium that has a more limited dynamic range. Print-outs, CRT or LCD monitors, and projectors all have a limited dynamic range that is inadequate to reproduce the full range of light intensities present in natural scenes
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Samsung Electronics
Samsung
Samsung
Electronics
Electronics
Co., Ltd. (Korean: 삼성전자; Hanja: 三星電子 (Literally "tristar electronics")) is a South Korean multinational electronics company headquartered in Suwon, South Korea.[1] Through extremely complicated ownership structure with some circular ownership,[3] it is the flagship company of the Samsung Group, accounting for 70% of the group's revenue in 2012.[4] Samsung Electronics
Electronics
has assembly plants and sales networks in 80 countries and employs around 308,745 people.[2] It is the world's largest information technology company by revenue
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LCD TV
Liquid-crystal-display televisions (LCD TV) are television sets that use liquid-crystal displays to produce images. LCD televisions are thinner and lighter than cathode ray tube (CRTs) of similar display size, and are available in much larger sizes. When manufacturing costs fell, this combination of features made LCDs practical for television receivers. In 2007, LCD televisions surpassed sales of CRT-based televisions worldwide for the first time,[citation needed] and their sales figures relative to other technologies are accelerating. LCD TVs are quickly displacing the only major competitors in the large-screen market, the plasma display panel and rear-projection television. LCDs are, by far, the most widely produced and sold television display type. LCDs also have a variety of disadvantages
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Technicolor SA
Technicolor
Technicolor
SA, formerly Thomson SARL and Thomson Multimedia, is a French multinational corporation that provides services and products for the communication, media and entertainment industries. Technicolor's headquarters are located in Issy-les-Moulineaux – France.[2] Other main office locations include Rennes
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Academy Of Motion Picture Arts And Sciences
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
(AMPAS, also known as simply the Academy) is a professional honorary organization with the stated goal of advancing the arts and sciences of motion pictures
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Plasma Display
A plasma display panel (PDP) is a type of flat panel display common to large TV displays 30 inches (76 cm) or larger
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Wide Color Gamut
In color reproduction, including computer graphics and photography, the gamut, or color gamut /ˈɡæmət/, is a certain complete subset of colors. The most common usage refers to the subset of colors which can be accurately represented in a given circumstance, such as within a given color space or by a certain output device. Another sense, less frequently used but still correct, refers to the complete set of colors found within an image at a given time
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Society Of Motion Picture And Television Engineers
The Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers
Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers
(SMPTE) (/ˈsɪmptiː/, rarely /ˈsʌmptiː/), founded in 1916 as the Society of Motion Picture Engineers or SMPE,[1] is a global professional association, of engineers, technologists, and executives working in the media and entertainment industry. An internationally recognized standards organization, SMPTE has more than 800 Standards, Recommended Practices, and Engineering Guidelines for broadcast, filmmaking, digital cinema, audio recording, information technology (IT), and medical imaging
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Philips
Koninklijke Philips
Philips
N.V. (Philips, stylized as PHILIPS) is a Dutch technology company headquartered in Amsterdam
Amsterdam
currently focused in the area of healthcare. It was founded in Eindhoven
Eindhoven
in 1891, by Gerard Philips
Philips
and his father Frederik. It was once one of the largest electronic conglomerates in the world and currently employs around 105,000 people across more than 60 countries.[1] Philips
Philips
is organized into three main divisions: Philips
Philips
Consumer Lifestyle (formerly Philips
Philips
Consumer Electronics and Philips
Philips
Domestic Appliances and Personal Care), Philips
Philips
Healthcare
Healthcare
(formerly Philips Medical Systems) and Philips
Philips
Lighting
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