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H.G. Wells
Herbert George Wells[3][4] (21 September 1866 – 13 August 1946), usually referred to as H. G. Wells, was an English writer. He was prolific in many genres, writing dozens of novels, short stories, and works of social commentary, satire, biography, and autobiography, including even two books on war games. He is now best remembered for his science fiction novels and is often called a "father of science fiction", along with Jules Verne
Jules Verne
and Hugo Gernsback.[5][6][a] During his own lifetime, however, he was most prominent as a forward-looking, even prophetic social critic who devoted his literary talents to the development of a progressive vision on a global scale. A futurist, he wrote a number of utopian works and foresaw the advent of airplanes, tanks, space travel, nuclear weapons, satellite television and something resembling the World Wide Web.[7] His science fiction imagined time travel, alien invasion, invisibility, and biological engineering
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H. G. Wells (other)
H. G. Wells
H. G. Wells
(1866–1946) was an English author. H. G. Wells
H. G. Wells
may also refer to: H. G. Wells
H. G. Wells
(crater), a lunar crater H G Wells: War with the World, a 2006 BBC Television docudrama Henry Gordon Wells
Henry Gordon Wells
(1879–1954), American lawyer and politician Helena G. Wells, a character on Warehouse 13See also[edit] H. G. Wells
H. G. Wells
SocietyThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title H. G
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Diabetes UK
Diabetes
Diabetes
UK is a British-based patient, healthcare professional and research charity that describes itself as the "leading UK charity that cares for, connects with and campaigns on behalf of all people affected by and at risk of diabetes."[1] The charity campaigns for improvements in the care and treatment of people with diabetes.Contents1 History 2 Research 3 Groups and events 4 Publications 5 Services 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksHistory[edit] Diabetes
Diabetes
UK was founded in 1934 as The Diabetic Association, by the author H. G. Wells
H. G. Wells
and Dr R. D
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Darwinism
Darwinism
Darwinism
is a theory of biological evolution developed by the English naturalist Charles Darwin
Charles Darwin
(1809–1882) and others, stating that all species of organisms arise and develop through the natural selection of small, inherited variations that increase the individual's ability to compete, survive, and reproduce. Also called Darwinian theory, it originally included the broad concepts of transmutation of species or of evolution which gained general scientific acceptance after Darwin published On the Origin of Species
Species
in 1859, including concepts which predated Darwin's theories
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Socialism
Socialism
Socialism
is a range of economic and social systems characterised by social ownership and democratic control of the means of production[10] as well as the political theories and movements associated with them.[11] Social ownership
Social ownership
may refer to forms of public, collective or cooperative ownership, or to citizen ownership of equity.[12] There are many varieties of socialism and there is no single definition encapsulating all of them,[13] though social ownership is the common element shared by its various forms.[5][14][15] Socialist
Socialist
economic systems can be divided into non-market and market forms.[16] Non-market socialism involves the substitution of factor markets and money, with engineering and technical criteria, based on calculation performed in-kind, thereby producing an economic mechanism that functions according to different economic laws from those of capitalism
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World War I
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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Pacifism
Pacifism
Pacifism
is opposition to war, militarism, or violence. The word pacifism was coined by the French peace campaigner Émile Arnaud (1864–1921) and adopted by other peace activists at the tenth Universal Peace Congress
Universal Peace Congress
in Glasgow
Glasgow
in 1901.[1] A related term is ahimsa (to do no harm), which is a core philosophy in Buddhism
Buddhism
and Jainism. While modern connotations are recent, having been explicated since the 19th century, ancient references abound. In modern times, interest was revived by Leo Tolstoy
Leo Tolstoy
in his late works, particularly in The Kingdom of God Is Within You. Mohandas Gandhi (1869–1948) propounded the practice of steadfast nonviolent opposition which he called "satyagraha", instrumental in its role in the Indian Independence Movement
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Didacticism
Didacticism is a philosophy that emphasizes instructional and informative qualities in literature and other types of art.[1][2]Contents1 Overview 2 Examples 3 See also 4 References 5 Further readingOverview[edit] The term has its origin in the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
word διδακτικός (didaktikos), "related to education and teaching", and signified learning in a fascinating and intriguing manner.[3] Didactic art was meant both to entertain and to instruct. Didactic plays, for instance, were intended to convey a moral theme or other rich truth to the audience.[4][5] An example of didactic writing is Alexander Pope's An Essay on Criticism
An Essay on Criticism
(1711), which offers a range of advice about critics and criticism
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The History Of Mr Polly
The History of Mr. Polly is a 1910 comic novel by H. G. Wells.Contents1 Plot summary 2 Themes 3 Criticism 4 Screen adaptations 5 Notes 6 References6.1 Bibliography7 External linksPlot summary[edit] The protagonist of The History of Mr. Polly is an antihero inspired by H. G. Wells' early experiences in the drapery trade: Alfred Polly, born circa 1870, a timid and directionless young man living in Edwardian England, who despite his own bumbling achieves contented serenity with little help from those around him. Mr
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Charles Dickens
Charles John Huffam Dickens (/ˈdɪkɪnz/; 7 February 1812 – 9 June 1870) was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world's best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.[1] His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime, and by the 20th century critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories enjoy lasting popularity.[2][3] Born in Portsmouth, Dickens left school to work in a factory when his father was incarcerated in a debtors' prison
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Tono-Bungay
Tono-Bungay
Tono-Bungay
/ˌtɒnoʊˈbʌŋɡi/ is a realist semiautobiographical novel written by H. G. Wells
H. G. Wells
and published in 1909. It has been called "arguably his most artistic book".[1] It was originally serialized in The English Review beginning in the magazine's first issue in December 1908. It was serialized in the United States in The Popular Magazine beginning in the September 1908 issue.[2]Contents1 Plot 2 Themes2.1 Scepticism 2.2 Socialism 2.3 Ennui 2.4 English society 2.5 Metaphysics3 Reception and criticism 4 Further reading 5 References 6 External linksPlot[edit] Tono-Bungay
Tono-Bungay
is narrated by George Ponderevo, who is persuaded to help develop the business of selling Tono-Bungay, a patent medicine created by his ambitious uncle Edward
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English Society
English society
English society
is the group behaviour of the English, how they organise themselves and make collective decisions. This article deals with the span from the emergence of the English nation to contemporary social questions in the country. The social history of England
England
evidences many social changes over the centuries. These major social changes have both internally and in its relationship with other nations. The themes of social history include demographic history, labour history and the working class, women's history, family history, the history of education in England, urban history and rural and agricultural history
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Cricket
Cricket
Cricket
is a bat-and-ball game played between two teams of eleven players each on a cricket field, at the centre of which is a rectangular 20-metre (22-yard) pitch with a target at each end called the wicket (a set of three wooden stumps upon which two bails sit). Each phase of play is called an innings, during which one team bats, attempting to score as many runs as possible, whilst their opponents bowl and field, attempting to minimise the number of runs scored. When each innings ends, the teams usually swap roles for the next innings (i.e. the team that previously batted will bowl/field, and vice versa). The teams each bat for one or two innings, depending on the type of match
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George Charles Beresford
George Charles Beresford
George Charles Beresford
(10 July 1864 – 21 February 1938) was a British studio photographer, originally from Drumlease, Dromahair, County Leitrim.[1] A member of the Beresford family headed by the Marquess of Waterford and the third of five children, he was the son of Major Henry Marcus Beresford (1835–1895) and Julia Ellen Maunsell (d. 1923).[2] His paternal grandfather was the Most Reverend Marcus Beresford, Archbishop of Armagh, youngest son of the Right Reverend George Beresford, Bishop of Kilmore, second son of John Beresford, second son of Marcus Beresford, 1st Earl of Tyrone.[2] Beresford was sent to Westward Ho!
Westward Ho!
in 1877 and attended the United Services College. On leaving in 1882 he enrolled at the Royal Indian Engineering College at Cooper's Hill, and from there went to India in 1882 as a civil engineer in the Public Works Department
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Domestic Worker
A domestic worker, domestic helper or domestic servant, also called menial, is a person who works within the employer's household. Domestic helpers perform a variety of household services for an individual or a family, from providing care for children and elderly dependents to housekeeping, including cleaning and household maintenance. Other responsibilities may include cooking, laundry and ironing, shopping for food and other household errands. Such work has always needed to be done but before the Industrial Revolution
Industrial Revolution
and the advent of labour saving devices, it was physically much harder. Some domestic helpers live within their employer's household. In some cases, the contribution and skill of servants whose work encompassed complex management tasks in large households have been highly valued. However, for the most part, domestic work, while necessary, is demanding and undervalued
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Amateur And Professional Cricketers
Cricket, and hence English amateur cricket, probably began in England during the medieval period but the earliest known reference concerns the game being played c.1550 by children on a plot of land at the Royal Grammar School, Guildford, Surrey.[1] It is generally believed that cricket was originally a children's game as it is not until the beginning of the 17th century that reports can be found of adult participation.[2] Originally, all cricketers were amateurs in the literal sense of the word. Village cricket
Village cricket
developed through the 17th century and teams typically comprised players who were all resident in the same village or parish
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