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H.263
H.263 is a video compression standard originally designed as a low-bit-rate compressed format for videoconferencing. It was developed by the ITU-T Video Coding Experts Group (VCEG) in a project ending in 1995/1996 as one member of the H.26x family of video coding standards in the domain of the ITU-T, and it was later extended to add various additional enhanced features in 1998 and 2000
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International Electrotechnical Commission
The International Electrotechnical Commission[3] (IEC; in French: Commission électrotechnique internationale) is an international standards organization[4][5] that prepares and publishes International Standards for all electrical, electronic and related technologies – collectively known as "electrotechnology". IEC standards cover a vast range of technologies from power generation, transmission and distribution to home appliances and office equipment, semiconductors, fibre optics, batteries, solar energy, nanotechnology and marine energy as well as many others
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Integrated Services Digital Network
Integrated Services Digital Network
Integrated Services Digital Network
(ISDN) is a set of communication standards for simultaneous digital transmission of voice, video, data, and other network services over the traditional circuits of the public switched telephone network. It was first defined in 1988 in the CCITT red book.[1] Prior to ISDN, the telephone system was viewed as a way to transport voice, with some special services available for data. The key feature of ISDN
ISDN
is that it integrates speech and data on the same lines, adding features that were not available in the classic telephone system
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MySpace
Myspace
Myspace
is a social networking website offering an interactive, user-submitted network of friends, personal profiles, blogs, groups, photos, music, and videos. Myspace
Myspace
was the largest social networking site in the world, from 2004 to 2010. It is headquartered in Beverly Hills, California.[5][6] Myspace
Myspace
was acquired by News Corporation
News Corporation
in July 2005 for $580 million[7], and in June 2006 surpassed Google
Google
as the most visited website in the United States.[8][9] In April 2008, Myspace
Myspace
was overtaken by Facebook
Facebook
in the number of unique worldwide visitors, and was surpassed in the number of unique U.S
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Google Video
Google
Google
Video
Video
was a free video hosting service from Google, similar to YouTube, that allowed video clips to be hosted on Google
Google
servers and embedded on to other websites
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Multimedia
Multimedia
Multimedia
is content that uses a combination of different content forms such as text, audio, images, animations, video and interactive content. Multimedia
Multimedia
contrasts with media that use only rudimentary computer displays such as text-only or traditional forms of printed or hand-produced material. Multimedia
Multimedia
can be recorded and played, displayed, interacted with or accessed by information content processing devices, such as computerized and electronic devices, but can also be part of a live performance. Multimedia
Multimedia
devices are electronic media devices used to store and experience multimedia content. Multimedia
Multimedia
is distinguished from mixed media in fine art; for example, by including audio it has a broader scope
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Software Release Life Cycle
A software release life cycle is the sum of the stages of development and maturity for a piece of computer software: ranging from its initial development to its eventual release, and including updated versions of the released version to help improve software or fix software bugs still present in the software.Contents1 History 2 Stages of development2.1 Pre-alpha 2.2 Alpha 2.3 Beta2.3.1 Open and closed beta2.4 Release candidate3 Release3.1 Release to manufacturing (RTM) 3.2 General availability (GA) 3.3 Release to web (RTW)4 Support4.1 End-of-life5 See also 6 References 7 BibliographyHistory[edit] Usage of the "alpha/beta" test terminology originated at IBM. As long ago as the 1950s (and probably earlier), IBM used similar terminology for their hardware development. "A" test was the verification of a new product before public announcement. "B" test was the verification before releasing the product to be manufactured
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Multimedia Messaging Service
Multimedia
Multimedia
Messaging Service (MMS) is a standard way to send messages that include multimedia content to and from a mobile phone over a cellular network
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IP Multimedia Subsystem
The IP Multimedia
Multimedia
Subsystem or IP Multimedia
Multimedia
Core Network Subsystem (IMS) is an architectural framework for delivering IP multimedia services. Historically, mobile phones have provided voice call services over a circuit-switched-style network, rather than strictly over an IP packet-switched network. Alternative methods of delivering voice (VoIP) or other multimedia services have become available on smartphones, but they have not become standardized across the industry.[citation needed] IMS is an architectural framework to provide such standardization. IMS was originally designed by the wireless standards body 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP), as a part of the vision for evolving mobile networks beyond GSM. Its original formulation (3GPP Rel-5) represented an approach for delivering Internet services over GPRS
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3GPP
The 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) is a collaboration between groups of telecommunications standards associations, known as the Organizational Partners. The initial scope of 3GPP was to make a globally applicable third-generation (3G) mobile phone[1] system specification based on evolved Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) specifications within the scope of the International Mobile Telecommunications-2000 project of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU)
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ETSI
The European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) is an independent, not-for-profit, standardization organization in the telecommunications industry (equipment makers and network operators) in Europe, headquartered in Sophia-Antipolis, France, with worldwide projection. ETSI
ETSI
produces globally-applicable standards for Information and Communications Technologies (ICT), including fixed, mobile, radio, converged, broadcast and internet technologies. ETSI
ETSI
was created by CEPT in 1988 and is officially recognized by the European Commission
European Commission
and the EFTA
EFTA
secretariat. Based in Sophia Antipolis (France), ETSI
ETSI
is officially responsible for standardization of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) within Europe. ETSI
ETSI
publishes between 2,000 and 2,500 standards every year
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Session Initiation Protocol
The Session Initiation Protocol
Session Initiation Protocol
(SIP) is a communications protocol for signaling and controlling multimedia communication sessions in applications of Internet telephony
Internet telephony
for voice and video calls, in private IP telephone systems, as well as in instant messaging over Internet Protocol
Internet Protocol
(IP) networks. The protocol defines the specific format of messages exchanged and the sequence of communications for cooperation of the participants
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LGPL
The GNU
GNU
Lesser General Public License (LGPL) is a free software license published by the Free Software Foundation
Free Software Foundation
(FSF). The license allows developers and companies to use and integrate software released under the LGPL into their own (even proprietary) software without being required by the terms of a strong copyleft license to release the source code of their own components. The license only requires software under the LGPL be modifiable by end users via source code availability. For proprietary software, code under the LGPL is usually used in the form of a shared library, so that there is a clear separation between the proprietary and LGPL components
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RTSP
The Real Time Streaming Protocol (RTSP) is a network control protocol designed for use in entertainment and communications systems to control streaming media servers. The protocol is used for establishing and controlling media sessions between end points. Clients of media servers issue VCR-style commands, such as play, record and pause, to facilitate real-time control of the media streaming from the server to a client (Video On Demand) or from a client to the server (Voice Recording). The transmission of streaming data itself is not a task of RTSP. Most RTSP servers use the Real-time Transport Protocol (RTP) in conjunction with Real-time Control Protocol (RTCP) for media stream delivery. However, some vendors implement proprietary transport protocols
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Streaming Media
Streaming media
Streaming media
is multimedia that is constantly received by and presented to an end-user while being delivered by a provider. The verb "to stream" refers to the process of delivering or obtaining media in this manner; the term refers to the delivery method of the medium, rather than the medium itself, and is an alternative to file downloading, a process in which the end-user obtains the entire file for the content before watching or listening to it. A client end-user can use their media player to start playing the data file (such as a digital file of a movie or song) before the entire file has been transmitted. Distinguishing delivery method from the media distributed applies specifically to telecommunications networks, as most of the delivery systems are either inherently streaming (e.g. radio, television, streaming apps) or inherently non-streaming (e.g. books, video cassettes, audio CDs)
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Circuit Switching
Circuit switching
Circuit switching
is a method of implementing a telecommunications network in which two network nodes establish a dedicated communications channel (circuit) through the network before the nodes may communicate. The circuit guarantees the full bandwidth of the channel and remains connected for the duration of the communication session. The circuit functions as if the nodes were physically connected as with an electrical circuit. The defining example of a circuit-switched network is the early analog telephone network. When a call is made from one telephone to another, switches within the telephone exchanges create a continuous wire circuit between the two telephones, for as long as the call lasts. Circuit switching
Circuit switching
contrasts with packet switching, which divides the data to be transmitted into packets transmitted through the network independently
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