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Hōjō Clan
The Hōjō clan
Hōjō clan
(北条氏, Hōjō shi) in the history of Japan was a family who controlled the hereditary title of shikken (regent) of the Kamakura shogunate
Kamakura shogunate
between 1203 and 1333. Despite the title, in practice the family wielded actual governmental power during this period compared to both the Kamakura shōguns, or the Imperial Court in Kyoto, whose authority was largely symbolic. The Hōjō are known for fostering Zen Buddhism
Zen Buddhism
and for leading the successful opposition to the Mongol invasions of Japan
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Southern Court
The Southern Court
Southern Court
(南朝, Nanchō) were a set of four emperors ( Emperor Go-Daigo
Emperor Go-Daigo
and his line) whose claims to sovereignty during the Nanboku-chō period
Nanboku-chō period
spanning from 1336 through 1392 were usurped by the Northern Court. This period ended with the Southern Court definitively losing the war, and they were forced to completely submit sovereignty to the Northern Court
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Zen Buddhism
Zen
Zen
in JapanDōgen Hakuin EkakuSeon in KoreaTaego Bou Jinul Daewon Seongcheol Zen
Zen
in the USAD. T
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Inheritance
Inheritance
Inheritance
is the practice of passing on property, titles, debts, rights, and obligations upon the death of an individual. The rules of inheritance differ between societies and have changed over time.Contents1 Terminology 2 History2.1 Jewish
Jewish
laws 2.2 Christian laws 2.3 Islamic laws3 Inequality3.1 Social stratification 3.2 Sociological and economic effects of inheritance inequality4 Taxation 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksTerminology[edit] In law, an heir is a person who is entitled to receive a share of the deceased's (the person who died) property, subject to the rules of inheritance in the jurisdiction of which the deceased was a citizen or where the deceased (decedent) died or owned property at the time of death. The inheritance may be either under the terms of a will or by intestate laws if the deceased had no will
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Confucianism
Hermeneutic schools:Old TextsNew Text Confucianism Confucianism
Confucianism
by country Confucianism
Confucianism
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Goseibai Shikimoku
The Goseibai Shikimoku
Goseibai Shikimoku
(御成敗式目) or the Formulary of Adjudications was the legal code of the Kamakura shogunate
Kamakura shogunate
in Japan, promulgated by third shikken Hōjō Yasutoki in 1232. It is also called Jōei Shikimoku (貞永式目) after the era name. Before enacting the Goseibai Shikimoku, the Kamakura shogunate conducted trials without formal laws. After the Jōkyū War, an increasing number of land disputes between its vassals, aristocrats and peasants made fair trials indispensable. Thereafter Hōjō Yasutoki compiled the outline with 51 article headings and 13 Hyojoshu (councilors) completed it. Supplementary articles to the Goseibai Shikimoku, called Tsuika (追加), were issued afterward. The Muromachi shogunate
Muromachi shogunate
also adopted the Goseibai Shikimoku
Goseibai Shikimoku
as the basic law
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Kyoto
Kyoto
Kyoto
(京都市, Kyōto-shi, pronounced [kʲoːꜜto] ( listen), pronounced [kʲoːtoꜜɕi] ( listen); UK: /kɪˈoʊtoʊ/, US: /kiˈoʊ-/, or /ˈkjoʊ-/[4]) is a city located in the central part of the island of Honshu, Japan. It has a population close to 1.5 million
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Shin Kokin Wakashū
The Shin Kokin Wakashū
Kokin Wakashū
(新古今和歌集, "New Collection of Poems Ancient and Modern"), also known in abbreviated form as the Shin Kokinshū (新古今集) or even conversationally as the Shin Kokin, is the eighth imperial anthology of waka poetry compiled by the Japanese court, beginning with the Kokin Wakashū
Kokin Wakashū
circa 905 and ending with the Shinshokukokin Wakashū circa 1439. The name can be literally translated as "New Collection of Ancient and Modern Poems"[1] and bears an intentional resemblance to that of the first anthology. Together with the Man'yōshū and the Kokinshū, the Shin Kokinshū is widely considered to be one of the three most influential poetic anthologies in Japanese literary history
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Emperor Go-Toba
Emperor Go-Toba
Emperor Go-Toba
(後鳥羽天皇, Go-Toba-tennō) (August 6, 1180 – March 28, 1239) was the 82nd emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. His reign spanned the years from 1183 through 1198.[1] This 12th-century sovereign was named after Emperor Toba, and go- (後), translates literally as "later"; and thus, he is sometimes called the "Later Emperor Toba"
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Battle Of Dan-no-ura
The battle of Dan-no-ura (壇ノ浦の戦い, Dan-no-ura no tatakai) was a major sea battle of the Genpei War, occurring at Dan-no-ura, in the Shimonoseki Strait
Shimonoseki Strait
off the southern tip of Honshū. On April 25, 1185, the fleet of the Minamoto
Minamoto
clan (Genji), led by Minamoto
Minamoto
no Yoshitsune, defeated the fleet of the Taira
Taira
clan (Heike). The morning rip tide was an advantage to the Taira
Taira
in the morning but turned to their disadvantage in the afternoon
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Minamoto
Minamoto (源) was one of the surnames bestowed by the Emperors of Japan upon members of the imperial family who were excluded from the line of succession and demoted into the ranks of the nobility. The practice was most prevalent during the Heian period
Heian period
(794–1185 AD), although its last occurrence was during the Sengoku period. The Taira were another such offshoot of the imperial dynasty, making both clans distant relatives
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Heike Monogatari
The Tale of the Heike (平家物語, Heike Monogatari) is an epic account compiled prior to 1330 of the struggle between the Taira
Taira
and Minamoto
Minamoto
clans for control of Japan
Japan
at the end of the 12th century in the Genpei War
Genpei War
(1180–1185). Heike (平家) refers to the Taira
Taira
(平) clan (家); "hei" being an alternate reading of the first kanji (character) of Taira. Note that in the title of the Genpei War, "hei" is in this combination read as "pei" and the "gen" (源) is the first kanji used in the Minamoto
Minamoto
(also known as Genji) clan's name. The Tale of Heike is often likened to a Japanese Iliad. It has been translated into English at least five times, the first by A. L. Sadler
A. L

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Hōjōki
Hōjōki (方丈記, literally "square-jō record"), variously translated as An Account of My Hut or The Ten Foot Square Hut, is an important and popular short work of the early Kamakura period (1185–1333) in Japan by Kamo no Chōmei. Written in 1212, the work depicts the Buddhist concept of impermanence (mujō) through the description of various disasters such as earthquake, famine, whirlwind and conflagration that befall the people of the capital city Kyoto. The author Chōmei, who in his early career worked as court poet and was also an accomplished player of the biwa and koto, became a Buddhist monk
Buddhist monk
in his fifties and moved farther and farther into the mountains, eventually living in a 10-foot square hut located at Mt. Hino. The work has been classified both as belonging to the zuihitsu genre and as Buddhist literature
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Imperial Court In Kyoto
The Imperial Court in Kyoto
Kyoto
was the nominal ruling government of Japan from 794 AD until the Meiji period
Meiji period
(1868–1912), after which the court was moved from Kyoto
Kyoto
to Tokyo
Tokyo
and integrated into the Meiji government. The shogunate system came after the Imperial Court, with Minamoto no Yoritomo
Minamoto no Yoritomo
being the first to establish the post of the shōgun as hereditary, in 1192. Since Minamoto no Yoritomo
Minamoto no Yoritomo
launched the shogunate, true power was in the hand of the shōguns, who were mistaken several times for the Emperors of Japan
Japan
by western countries.See also[edit]Five regent houses Heian Palace Kyoto
Kyoto
GoshoFurther reading[edit]Ackroyd, Joyce. (1982)
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Ashikaga Clan
The Ashikaga clan
Ashikaga clan
(足利氏, Ashikaga-shi) was a prominent Japanese samurai clan which established the Muromachi shogunate
Muromachi shogunate
and ruled Japan from roughly 1336 to 1573.[1] The Ashikaga were descended from a branch of the Minamoto clan, deriving originally from the town of Ashikaga in Shimotsuke province (modern-day Tochigi prefecture). For about a century the clan was divided in two rival branches, the Kantō Ashikaga, who ruled from Kamakura, and the Kyōto Ashikaga, rulers of Japan. The rivalry ended with the defeat of the first in 1439
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Regent
A regent (from the Latin
Latin
regens,[1] "[one] ruling"[2]) is "a person appointed to administer a state because the monarch is a minor, is absent or is incapacitated."[3] The rule of a regent or regents is called a regency. A regent or regency council may be formed ad hoc or in accordance with a constitutional rule. "Regent" is sometimes a formal title. If the regent is holding his position due to his position in the line of succession, the compound term prince regent is often used; if the regent of a minor is his mother, she is often referred to as "queen regent". If the formally appointed regent is unavailable or cannot serve on a temporary basis, a Regent
Regent
ad interim may be appointed to fill the gap. In a monarchy, a regent usually governs due to one of these reasons, but may also be elected to rule during the interregnum when the royal line has died out
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