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Hôtel De Bernuy
The Hôtel de Bernuy
Hôtel de Bernuy
in rue Léon Gambetta,[1] Toulouse, France, is a Renaissance hôtel particulier (palace) of the 16th century built by the mason Louis Privat for the woad merchant, Jean de Bernuy.[2]Contents1 History 2 Pictures 3 Bibliography 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] The facade of Hôtel de Bernuy
Hôtel de Bernuy
was built between 1503 to 1504,[1] while the gothic brick courtyard and its tower were constructed from 1530 to 1533 for the Renaissance stone courtyard. The owner was a rich woad merchant, Jean de Bernuy, a Spanish Jew who had fled the inquisition and was credit-worthy enough to be the main guarantor of the ransomed King Francis I after his capture at the Battle of Pavia by Charles V of Spain. It is an original example of Renaissance palaces architecture of Toulouse, with a stone decoration of the cour d'honneur (courtyard) influenced by Spanish Plateresque
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French Language
French (le français [lə fʁɑ̃sɛ] ( listen) or la langue française [la lɑ̃ɡ fʁɑ̃sɛz]) is a Romance language
Romance language
of the Indo-European family. It descended from the Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
of the Roman Empire, as did all Romance languages. French has evolved from Gallo-Romance, the spoken Latin
Latin
in Gaul, and more specifically in Northern Gaul. Its closest relatives are the other langues d'oïl—languages historically spoken in northern France
France
and in southern Belgium, which French (Francien) has largely supplanted. French was also influenced by native Celtic languages
Celtic languages
of Northern Roman Gaul
Gaul
like Gallia Belgica
Gallia Belgica
and by the (Germanic) Frankish language of the post-Roman Frankish invaders
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Nicolas Bachelier
Nicolas Bachelier (1485–1557) was a French surveyor, architect, and mason.[1] In 1539, Bachelier and his colleague Arnaud Casanove, who described themselves as expert levelers, proposed a survey for a canal from Toulouse to Carcassonne to Francis I. Francis I had previously discussed the possibility of such a canal with Leonardo da Vinci. They also proposed that barges could either float down the Garonne River to Bordeaux or could traverse a canal parallel to the river. Francis I approved their plans [2] which included a lock-free canal of variable depth. These plans proved to be inaccurate and could not be executed. In 1598, Henri IV re-examined the plans, but nothing was done until Pierre Paul Riquet began the successful endeavor of the Canal du Midi in 1662.[1] References[edit]^ a b Lance Day, Ian McNeil, ed. (1996). Biographical Dictionary of the History of Technology. Routledge. ISBN 0-415-19399-0.  ^ Rolt, L. T. C. (1973). From Sea to Sea
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Renaissance Architecture
Renaissance
Renaissance
architecture is the European architecture of the period between the early 14th and early 17th centuries in different regions, demonstrating a conscious revival and development of certain elements of ancient Greek and Roman thought and material culture. Stylistically, Renaissance
Renaissance
architecture followed Gothic architecture and was succeeded by Baroque architecture. Developed first in Florence, with Filippo Brunelleschi
Filippo Brunelleschi
as one of its innovators, the Renaissance
Renaissance
style quickly spread to other Italian cities
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Gothic Architecture
Gothic architecture
Gothic architecture
is an architectural style that flourished in Europe
Europe
during the High and Late Middle Ages. It evolved from Romanesque architecture
Romanesque architecture
and was succeeded by Renaissance
Renaissance
architecture. Originating in 12th century France
France
and lasting into the 16th century, Gothic architecture
Gothic architecture
was known during the period as Opus Francigenum ("French work") with the term Gothic first appearing during the later part of the Renaissance. Its characteristics include the pointed arch, the ribbed vault (which evolved from the joint vaulting of Romanesque architecture) and the flying buttress. Gothic architecture
Gothic architecture
is most familiar as the architecture of many of the great cathedrals, abbeys and churches of Europe
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Plateresque
Plateresque, meaning "in the manner of a silversmith" (plata being silver in Spanish), was an artistic movement, especially architectural, developed in Spain
Spain
and its territories, which appeared between the late Gothic and early Renaissance
Renaissance
in the late 15th century, and spread over the next two centuries. It is a modification of Gothic spatial concepts and an eclectic blend of Mudéjar, Flamboyant
Flamboyant
Gothic and Lombard decorative components, as well as Renaissance
Renaissance
elements of Tuscan origin.[1] Examples of this syncretism are the inclusion of shields and pinnacles on facades, columns built in the Renaissance
Renaissance
neoclassical manner, and facades divided into three parts (in Renaissance
Renaissance
architecture they are divided into two)
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Toulouse Métropole
Toulouse
Toulouse
Métropole is the métropole, an intercommunal structure, centred on the city of Toulouse. It is located in the Haute-Garonne department, in the Occitanie
Occitanie
region, southern France
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Monument Historique
Monument historique
Monument historique
(French: [mɔnymɑ̃ istɔʁik]) is a designation given to some national heritage sites in France. It may also refer to the state procedure in France
France
by which National Heritage protection is extended to a building, a specific part of a building, a collection of buildings, garden, bridge, or other structure, because of their importance to France's architectural and historical cultural heritage.[1] Both public and privately owned structures may be listed in this way, as well as also movable objects. As of 2012 there were 44,236 monuments listed. Buildings may be given the classification for both their exteriors or interiors, including a building's décor, its furniture, a single room, or even a staircase
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Cour D'honneur
Cour d'honneur
Cour d'honneur
(French pronunciation: ​[kuʁ dɔnœʁ], court of honor) is the architectural term for a three-sided ceremonial courtyard, created by flanking the main central block, or corps de logis, with symmetrical advancing secondary wings containing minor rooms. The Palace of Versailles
Palace of Versailles
(illustration) and Blenheim Palace (plan) both feature such entrance courts. Some 16th-century symmetrical Western European country houses built on U-shaped groundplans resulted in a sheltered central door in a main range that was embraced between projecting wings, but the formalized cour d'honneur is first found in the great palaces and mansions of 17th-century Europe, where it forms the principal approach and ceremonial entrance to the building
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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Hôtel Particulier
An hôtel particulier (French pronunciation: ​[otɛl paʁtikylje]; "hôtel" being rendered in Middle English as "inn"—as only used now in Inns of Court—and "particulier" meaning "personal" or "private")[1] is a townhouse of a grand sort, comparable to the British townhouse
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Toulouse
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Toulouse
Toulouse
(/tuːˈluːz/;[4] French: [tuluz] ( listen), locally [tuˈluzə] ( listen); Occitan: Tolosa [tuˈluzɔ], Latin: Tolosa) is the capital of the French department of Haute-Garonne
Haute-Garonne
and of the region of Occitanie. The city is on the banks of the River Garonne, 150 kilometres (93 miles) from the Mediterranean Sea, 230 km (143 mi) from the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
and 680 km (420 mi) from Paris. It is the fourth-largest city in France, with 466,297 inhabitants as of January 2014
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Woad
Isatis
Isatis
indigotica Fortune Isatis
Isatis
tinctoria - MHNT Isatis
Isatis
tinctoria, also called woad (/ˈwoʊd/), dyer's woad, or glastum, is a flowering plant in the family Brassicaceae. It is occasionally known as Asp of Jerusalem. Woad
Woad
is also the name of a blue dye produced from the leaves[2] of the plant. Woad
Woad
is native to the steppe and desert zones of the Caucasus, Central Asia to eastern Siberia
Siberia
and Western Asia
Western Asia
(per Hegi[3]) but is now also found in southeastern and Central Europe
Europe
and western North America. Since ancient times, woad was an important source of blue dye and was cultivated throughout Europe, especially in Western and Southern Europe. In medieval times there were important woad-growing regions in England, Germany and France
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Hôtel De Bernuy
The Hôtel de Bernuy
Hôtel de Bernuy
in rue Léon Gambetta,[1] Toulouse, France, is a Renaissance hôtel particulier (palace) of the 16th century built by the mason Louis Privat for the woad merchant, Jean de Bernuy.[2]Contents1 History 2 Pictures 3 Bibliography 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] The facade of Hôtel de Bernuy
Hôtel de Bernuy
was built between 1503 to 1504,[1] while the gothic brick courtyard and its tower were constructed from 1530 to 1533 for the Renaissance stone courtyard. The owner was a rich woad merchant, Jean de Bernuy, a Spanish Jew who had fled the inquisition and was credit-worthy enough to be the main guarantor of the ransomed King Francis I after his capture at the Battle of Pavia by Charles V of Spain. It is an original example of Renaissance palaces architecture of Toulouse, with a stone decoration of the cour d'honneur (courtyard) influenced by Spanish Plateresque
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