HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Gylippus
GYLIPPUS (/dʒɪˈlɪpəs/ ; Greek : Γύλιππος) was a Spartan general of the 5th century BC; he was the son of Cleandridas , who was the adviser of King Pleistoanax and had been expelled from Sparta
Sparta
for accepting Athenian bribes in 446 BC and fled to Thurii
Thurii
, a pan-Hellenic colony then being founded in the instep of Italy
Italy
with Athenian help and participation. His mother may have been a helot , which meant he was not a true Spartiate but a mothax , a man of inferior status. Despite this, however, from an early childhood he was trained for war in the traditional Spartan fashion and on reaching maturity had been elected to a military mess, his dues contributed by a wealthier Spartiate patron . For an individual of marginal origins, war was an opportunity to gain honour and eminence
[...More...]

"Gylippus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Plutarch
PLUTARCH (/ˈpluːtɑːrk/ ; Greek : Πλούταρχος, Ploútarkhos, Koine Greek: ; c. AD 46 – AD 120), later named, upon becoming a Roman citizen , LUCIUS MESTRIUS PLUTARCHUS, (Λούκιος Μέστριος Πλούταρχος) was a Greek biographer and essayist , known primarily for his Parallel Lives and Moralia . He is classified as a Middle Platonist . Plutarch's surviving works were written in Greek, but intended for both Greek and Roman readers
[...More...]

"Plutarch" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Thucydides
THUCYDIDES (/θjuːˈsɪdᵻdiːz/ ; Ancient Greek : Θουκυδίδης, Thoukydídēs, ; c. 460 – c. 400 BC) was an Athenian historian and general . His History of the Peloponnesian War recounts the 5th century BC war between Sparta and Athens to the year 411 BC. Thucydides has been dubbed the father of "scientific history" by those who accept his claims to have applied strict standards of evidence-gathering and analysis of cause and effect, without reference to intervention by the gods, as outlined in his introduction to his work. He has also been called the father of the school of political realism , which views the political behavior of individuals and the subsequent outcomes of relations between states as ultimately mediated by and constructed upon the emotions of fear and self-interest . His text is still studied at both universities and military colleges worldwide
[...More...]

"Thucydides" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Timaeus (historian)
TIMAEUS ( Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
: Τιμαῖος; c. 345 BC – c. 250 BC) was an ancient Greek historian . CONTENTS * 1 Biography * 2 Work * 3 Reception * 4 See also * 5 Notes * 6 References * 7 Further reading BIOGRAPHYHe was born at Tauromenium (modern Taormina
Taormina
) in Sicily
Sicily
. Driven out of Sicily
Sicily
by Agathocles , he migrated to Athens
Athens
, where he studied rhetoric under a pupil of Isocrates
Isocrates
and lived for fifty years. During the reign of Hiero II he returned to Sicily
Sicily
(probably to Syracuse ), where he died. WORKWhile at Athens
Athens
he completed his great historical work, the Histories, probably some 40 books
[...More...]

"Timaeus (historian)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Diodorus
DIODORUS SICULUS (/ˌdaɪəˈdɔːrəs ˈsɪkjʊləs/ ; Greek : Διόδωρος Σικελιώτης Diodoros Sikeliotes) (fl. 1st century BC) or DIODORUS OF SICILY was a Greek historian . He is known for writing the monumental universal history Bibliotheca historica
Bibliotheca historica
, much of which survives, between 60 and 30 BC. It is arranged in three parts. The first covers mythic history up to the destruction of Troy
Troy
, arranged geographically, describing regions around the world from Egypt, India
India
and Arabia
Arabia
to Greece
Greece
and Europe. The second covers the Trojan War to the death of Alexander the Great
Alexander the Great
. The third covers the period to about 60 BC. Bibliotheca, meaning 'library', acknowledges that he was drawing on the work of many other authors
[...More...]

"Diodorus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Siege
A SIEGE is a military blockade of a city or fortress with the intent of conquering by attrition or assault. This derives from sedere, Latin for "to sit". Siege
Siege
warfare is a form of constant, low-intensity conflict characterized by one party holding a strong, static defensive position. Consequently, an opportunity for negotiation between combatants is not uncommon, as proximity and fluctuating advantage can encourage diplomacy. A siege occurs when an attacker encounters a city or fortress that cannot be easily taken by direct assault and refuses to surrender . Sieges involve surrounding the target and blocking the reinforcement or escape of troops or provision of supplies (a tactic known as "investment " ), typically coupled with attempts to reduce the fortifications by means of siege engines , artillery bombardment, mining (also known as sapping), or the use of deception or treachery to bypass defences
[...More...]

"Siege" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Greek Language
GREEK ( Modern Greek : ελληνικά , elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα ( listen ), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean . It has the longest documented history of any living Indo-European language, spanning 34 centuries of written records. Its writing system has been the Greek alphabet for the major part of its history; other systems, such as Linear B and the Cypriot syllabary , were used previously. The alphabet arose from the Phoenician script and was in turn the basis of the Latin
Latin
, Cyrillic
Cyrillic
, Armenian , Coptic , Gothic and many other writing systems
[...More...]

"Greek Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Scandal
A SCANDAL can be broadly defined as an accusation or accusations that receive wide exposure. Generally there is a negative effect on the credibility of the person or organisation involved. Society is scandalised when it is made aware of blatant breaches of moral norms or legal requirements. In contemporary times, exposure is often made by mass media. Such breaches have typically erupted from greed, lust or the abuse of power. Scandals may be regarded as political, sexual, moral, literary or artistic but often spread from one realm into another. The basis of a scandal may be factual or false, or a combination of both. Contemporary media has the capacity to spread knowledge of a scandal further than in previous centuries and public interest has encouraged many cases of confected scandals relating to well-known people as well as genuine scandals relating to politics and business
[...More...]

"Scandal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition
The ENCYCLOPæDIA BRITANNICA ELEVENTH EDITION (1910–11) is a 29-volume reference work, an edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
. It was developed during the encyclopaedia's transition from a British to an American publication. Some of its articles were written by the best-known scholars of the time. This edition of the encyclopedia is now in the public domain , but the outdated nature of some of its content makes its use as a source for modern scholarship problematic. Some articles have special value and interest to modern scholars as cultural artifacts of the 19th and early 20th centuries. Tens of thousands of its articles were copied directly into , where they still can be found
[...More...]

"Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Trial In Absentia
TRIAL IN ABSENTIA is a criminal proceeding in a court of law in which the person who is subject to it is not physically present at those proceedings. In absentia is Latin
Latin
for "in the absence". Its meaning varies by jurisdiction and legal system. In common law legal systems, the phrase is more than a spatial description. In these systems it suggests a recognition of a violation to a defendant's right to be present in court proceedings in a criminal trial. Conviction in a trial in which a defendant is not present to answer the charges is held to be a violation of natural justice. Specifically, it violates the second principle of natural justice , audi alteram partem (hear the other party). In some civil law legal systems , such as that of Italy, absentia is a recognized and accepted defensive strategy. Such trials may require the presence of the defendant's lawyer, depending on the country
[...More...]

"Trial In Absentia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Recorded History
RECORDED HISTORY or WRITTEN HISTORY is a historical narrative based on a written record or other documented communication. Recorded history can be contrasted with other narratives of the past, such as mythological , oral or archeological traditions. For broader world history , recorded history begins with the accounts of the ancient world around the 4th millennium BC , and coincides with the invention of writing . Examples of written texts, however, can be found dating as far back as 1750 BCE in Ancient Mesopotamia, such as Hammurabi\'s Code . For some geographic regions or cultures, written history is limited to a relatively recent period in human history because of the limited use of written records
[...More...]

"Recorded History" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Embezzle
EMBEZZLEMENT is the act of withholding assets for the purpose of conversion (theft ) of such assets, by one or more persons to whom the assets were entrusted, either to be held or to be used for specific purposes. Embezzlement is a type of financial fraud , e.g. a lawyer might embezzle funds from the trust accounts of their clients; a financial advisor might embezzle the funds of investors; and a husband or a wife might embezzle funds from a bank account jointly held with the spouse . Embezzlement usually is a premeditated crime, performed methodically, with precautions that conceal the criminal conversion of the property, which occurs without the knowledge or consent of the affected person. Often it involves the trusted individual embezzling only a small proportion of the total of the funds or resources they receive or control; in an attempt to minimize the risk of the detection of the misallocation of the funds or resources
[...More...]

"Embezzle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ephor
This article is part of the series: SPARTAN CONSTITUTION ------------------------- Great Rhetra Laws of Lycurgus Politeia LIST OF KINGS OF SPARTA GEROUSIA EPHORATE APELLA OF THE DAMOS SPARTIATES PERIOECI HELOTS AGOGE SYSSITIA ------------------------- Spartan army • Other Greek city-states • LAW PORTAL * view * talk * edit The EPHORS were leaders of ancient Sparta
Sparta
and shared power with the two Spartan kings . The ephors were a council of five elected annually who swore "on behalf of the city", while the kings swore for themselves. Herodotus
Herodotus
claimed that the institution was created by Lycurgus , while Plutarch
Plutarch
considers it a later institution. It may have arisen from the need for governors while the kings were leading armies in battle
[...More...]

"Ephor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Silver Coin
SILVER COINS are possibly the oldest mass-produced form of coinage . Silver
Silver
has been used as a coinage metal since the times of the Greeks ; their silver drachmas were popular trade coins. The ancient Persians used silver coins between 612-330 BC. Before 1797, British pennies were made of silver. As with all collectible coins, many factors determine the value of a silver coin, such as its rarity, demand, condition and the number originally minted. Ancient silver coins coveted by collectors include the Denarius
Denarius
and Miliarense , while more recent collectible silver coins include the Morgan Dollar and the Spanish Milled Dollar . Other than collector's silver coins, silver bullion coins are popular among people who desire a "hedge " against currency inflation or store of value
[...More...]

"Silver Coin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Polyaenus
POLYAENUS or POLYENUS (/ˌpɒliˈiːnəs/ POL-ee-EE-nəs ; see ae (æ) vs. e ; Greek : Πoλύαινoς, Polyainos, "much-praised") was a 2nd-century Macedonian author, known best for his Stratagems in War (in Greek, Στρατηγήματα), which has been preserved. The Suda calls him a rhetorician , and Polyaenus himself writes that he was accustomed to plead causes before the emperor . Polyaenus dedicated Stratagems in War to the two emperors Marcus Aurelius (161–180 CE) and Verus (161–169 CE), while they were engaged in the Parthian war (162–165 CE), about 163 CE, at which time he was too old to accompany them in their campaigns
[...More...]

"Polyaenus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
SPECIAL or SPECIALS may refer to: CONTENTS * 1 Music * 2 Film and television * 3 Other uses * 4 See also MUSIC * Special (album) , a 1992 album by Vesta Williams * "Special" (Garbage song) , 1998 * "Special" (Mew song) , 2005 * "Special" (Stephen Lynch song) , 2000 * The Specials
The Specials
, a British band * "Special", a song by Violent Femmes on The Blind Leading the Naked * "Special", a song on
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.