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Gyala Peri
Gyala Peri
Gyala Peri
(Chinese: 加拉白垒, Pinyin: Jiālābáilěi) is a peak just beyond the eastern end of the Himalayas
Himalayas
at the entrance to Tsangpo gorge. It is part of Nyenchen Tanglha Shan,[3] although it is sometimes included in Namcha Barwa Himal
Namcha Barwa Himal
of the Himalayas. Gyala Peri
Gyala Peri
lies just north of the Great Bend of the Yarlung Tsangpo River, the main river of southeastern Tibet, which becomes the Brahmaputra
Brahmaputra
in India
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Summit
A summit is a point on a surface that is higher in elevation than all points immediately adjacent to it. Mathematically, a summit is a local maximum in elevation. The topographic terms "acme", "apex", "peak", and "zenith" are synonymous.Contents1 Definition1.1 Western United States 1.2 Summit
Summit
climbing equipment2 See also 3 References 4 External linksDefinition[edit] The term "top" is generally used only for a mountain peak that is located some distance from the nearest point of higher elevation. For example, a big massive rock next to the main summit of a mountain is not considered a summit. Summits near a higher peak, with some prominence or isolation, but not reaching a certain cutoff value for the quantities, are often considered subsummits (or subpeaks) of the higher peak, and are considered as part of the same mountain. A pyramidal peak is an exaggerated form produced by ice erosion of a mountain top
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Mountain Range
A mountain range or hill range is a series of mountains or hills ranged in a line and connected by high ground. A mountain system or mountain belt is a group of mountain ranges with similarity in form, structure and alignment that have arisen from the same cause, usually an orogeny.[1] Mountain
Mountain
ranges are formed by a variety of geological processes, but most of the significant ones on Earth
Earth
are the result of plate tectonics. Mountain
Mountain
ranges are also found on many planetary mass objects in the Solar System
Solar System
and are likely a feature of most terrestrial planets. Mountain
Mountain
ranges are usually segmented by highlands or mountain passes and valleys. Individual mountains within the same mountain range do not necessarily have the same geologic structure or petrology
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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India
India, officially the Republic
Republic
of India
India
(IAST: Bhārat Gaṇarājya),[e] is a country in South Asia. It is the seventh-largest country by area, the second-most populous country (with over 1.2 billion people), and the most populous democracy in the world. It is bounded by the Indian Ocean
Indian Ocean
on the south, the Arabian Sea on the southwest, and the Bay of Bengal
Bay of Bengal
on the southeast. It shares land borders with Pakistan
Pakistan
to the west;[f] China, Nepal, and Bhutan
Bhutan
to the northeast; and Myanmar
Myanmar
and Bangladesh
Bangladesh
to the east. In the Indian Ocean, India
India
is in the vicinity of Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
and the Maldives
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Tibet
Coordinates: 31°12′N 88°48′E / 31.2°N 88.8°E / 31.2; 88.8              "Greater Tibet" as claimed by Tibetan exile groups Tibetan autonomous areas, as designated by China  Tibet
Tibet
Autonomous Region, within ChinaChinese-controlled, claimed by
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Pinyin
Hanyu Pinyin
Hanyu Pinyin
Romanization
Romanization
(simplified Chinese: 汉语拼音; traditional Chinese: 漢語拼音), often abbreviated to pinyin, is the official romanization system for Standard Chinese
Standard Chinese
in mainland China
China
and to some extent in Taiwan. It is often used to teach Standard Mandarin Chinese, which is normally written using Chinese characters. The system includes four diacritics denoting tones. Pinyin
Pinyin
without tone marks is used to spell Chinese names and words in languages written with the Latin alphabet, and also in certain computer input methods to enter Chinese characters. The pinyin system was developed in the 1950s by many linguists, including Zhou Youguang,[1] based on earlier form romanizations of Chinese
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Chinese Language
Legend:   Countries identified Chinese as a primary, administrative, or native language   Countries with more than 5,000,000 Chinese speakers   Countries with more than 1,000,000 Chinese speakers   Countries with more than 500,000 Chinese speakers   Countries with more than 100,000 Chinese speakers   Major Chinese-speaking settlementsThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters
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Normal Route
A normal route or normal way (French: Voie Normale; German: Normalweg) is the most frequently used route for ascending and descending a mountain peak. It is usually the simplest route.[1][2] In the Alps, routes are classed in the following ways, based on their waymarking, construction and upkeep:Footpaths (Fußwege) Hiking trails (Wanderwege) Mountain trails (Bergwege) Alpine routes (Alpine Routen) Climbing
Climbing
routes (Kletterrouten) and High Alpine routes (Hochalpine Routen) in combined rock and ice terrain, (UIAA) graded by difficultySometimes the normal route is not the easiest ascent to the summit, but just the one that is most used. There may be technically easier variations. This is especially the case on the Watzmannfrau, the Hochkalter
Hochkalter
and also Mount Everest
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Nyenchen Tanglha Shan
Coordinates: 30°30′0″N 94°30′00″E / 30.50000°N 94.50000°E / 30.50000; 94.50000Nyenchen Tanglha MountainsThe Nyainqêntanglha Mountains Viewed from the Qinghai–Tibet Railway.Chinese nameChinese 念青唐古拉山TranscriptionsStandard MandarinHanyu Pinyin Niànqīng Tánggǔlā ShānTibetan nameTibetan གཉན་ཆེན་ཐང་ལྷTranscriptionsWylie gnyan chen thang lhaTHL NyenchenthanglhaTibetan Pinyin NyainqêntanglhaThe Nyenchen Tanglha Mountains (official Chinese spelling: Nyainqêntanglha Mountains) are a 700-kilometre (430 mi) long mountain range, and subrange of the Transhimalaya System, located in the Tibet region and the Tibet Autonomous Region of China.[1][2]Contents1 Geography1.1 Subranges1.1.1 West Nyenchen Tanglha 1.1.2 East Nyenchen Tanglha2 References2.1 Notes 2.2 Sources 2.3 Further reading<
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First Ascent
In mountaineering, a first ascent (abbreviated to FA in guidebooks) is the first successful, documented attainment of the top of a mountain, or the first to follow a particular climbing route. First mountain ascents are notable because they entail genuine exploration, with greater risks, challenges, and recognition than climbing a route pioneered by others. The person who performs the first ascent is called the first ascensionist. In free climbing, a first ascent (or first free ascent, abbreviated FFA) of a climbing route is the first successful, documented climb of a route without using equipment such as anchors or ropes for aiding progression or resting.Contents1 History 2 Related terms 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The details of the first ascents of even many prominent mountains are scanty or unknown; sometimes the only evidence of prior summiting is a cairn, artifacts, or inscriptions at the top
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McMahon Line
The McMahon Line
McMahon Line
is a border line between Tibetan region of China
China
and North-east region of India, proposed by British colonial administrator Henry McMahon
Henry McMahon
at the 1914 Simla Convention which was signed between the British and the Tibetan representatives.[1] It is currently the effective boundary between China
China
and India, although its legal status is being disputed between the Indian and the Chinese government. [2][3] The line is named after Henry McMahon, foreign secretary of British India
India
and the chief negotiator of the convention at Simla
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List Of Mountain Lists
Perhaps the first of what would become many notable mountain lists around the world was Sir Hugh Munro’s catalog of the Munros, the peaks above 3,000’ in Scotland).[1] Once defined the list became a popular target for what became known as peak bagging, where the adventurous attempted to summit all of the peaks on the list.[2] Over time the peaks on such lists grew more challenging
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Nyingchi Prefecture
Nyingchi
Nyingchi
also known as Linzhi is a prefecture-level city in southeast of the Tibet Autonomous Region. The administrative seat of Nyingchi
Nyingchi
is Bayi District. The Chinese claim part of Arunachal Pradesh, which is one of the states of India, as part of the prefecture
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Topographic Prominence
In topography, prominence[a] characterizes the height of a mountain or hill's summit by the vertical distance between it and the lowest contour line encircling it but containing no higher summit within it. It is a measure of the independence of a summit. A peak's key col is a unique point on this contour line and the parent peak is some higher mountain, selected according to various objective criteria.Contents1 Definitions 2 Illustration 3 In mountaineering 4 Parent peak4.1 Encirclement or island parentage 4.2 Prominence parentage 4.3 Line parentage 4.4 Other criteria5 Issues in choice of summit and key col 6 Interesting prominence situations 7 Calculations and mathematics 8 Wet prominence and dry prominence 9 See also 10 Notes 11 References 12 External linksDefinitions[edit]Figure 1. Vertical arrows show the topographic prominence of three peaks on an island. The dashed horizontal lines show the lowest contours that do not encircle higher peaks
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