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Gustaw Gwozdecki
Gustaw Gwozdecki
Gustaw Gwozdecki
(May 5, 1880 in Warsaw
Warsaw
– March 3, 1935 in Paris) was a Polish painter, sculptor, printmaker, and a representative of Post-Impressionist Kapists.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Selected paintings 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] He was the son of Florentyn, a journalist and vice-director of the Warsaw
Warsaw
Theatre Directorate. In 1899, he began his artistic studies in Munich
Munich
where he was accompanied privately by Stanisław Grocholski
Stanisław Grocholski
and Anton Ažbe.[2] There he debuted at the Kunstverein, where he exhibited his artwork. In 1900, he went to Kraków
Kraków
where he studied at the Jan Matejko Academy of Fine Arts, where he was taught by Jan Stanisławski, and since 1901, in Warsaw
Warsaw
where he was taught by Konrad Krzyżanowski
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Warsaw
From top, left to right: Warsaw
Warsaw
Skyline Royal Baths Park Royal Route Staszic Palace
Staszic Palace
and Copernicus Monument
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Guillaume Apollinaire
Guillaume Apollinaire
Apollinaire
(French: [ɡijom apɔlinɛʁ]; 26 August 1880 – 9 November 1918) was a French poet, playwright, short story writer, novelist, and art critic of Polish descent. Apollinaire
Apollinaire
is considered one of the foremost poets of the early 20th century, as well as one of the most impassioned defenders of Cubism and a forefather of Surrealism. He is credited with coining the term "cubism" in 1911 to describe the emerging art movement and the term "surrealism" in 1917 to describe the works of Erik Satie. The term Orphism (1912) is also his
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France
France
France
(French: [fʁɑ̃s]), officially the French Republic (French: République française [ʁepyblik fʁɑ̃sɛz]), is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France
France
in western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.[XIII] The metropolitan area of France
France
extends from the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the English Channel
English Channel
and the North Sea, and from the Rhine
Rhine
to the Atlantic Ocean. The overseas territories include French Guiana
French Guiana
in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans
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Society Of Polish Artists "Sztuka"
The Society of Polish Artists "Sztuka" (Polish: Towarzystwo Artystów Polskich "Sztuka"; Sztuka means Art in Polish, artyzm means artistic abilities) founded in 1897 in Kraków, was a gathering of prominent Polish visual artists from around the turn of the century (or fin-de-siècle era) living under the foreign partitions of Poland. Its main goal was to reaffirm the importance and unique character of Polish contemporary art at a time, when Poland could not exist as sovereign nation.[1] The immediate inspiration for the founding of the new society came from the ground-breaking art exhibit inaugurated on May 27, 1897 at Sukiennice in Main Square, Kraków.[2] It was held by Polish modernist painters,[2] and called A Separate Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture (Wystawa osobna obrazów i rzeźb).[3] The show was visited by approximately 6,000 guests, and proclaimed a success
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Landscape Painting
Landscape
Landscape
painting, also known as landscape art, is the depiction in art of landscapes – natural scenery such as mountains, valleys, trees, rivers, and forests, especially where the main subject is a wide view – with its elements arranged into a coherent composition. In other works, landscape backgrounds for figures can still form an important part of the work. Sky is almost always included in the view, and weather is often an element of the composition. Detailed landscapes as a distinct subject are not found in all artistic traditions, and develop when there is already a sophisticated tradition of representing other subjects. The two main traditions spring from Western painting
Western painting
and Chinese art, going back well over a thousand years in both cases
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Caryatid
A caryatid (/kæriˈætɪd/ kair-ee-AT-id; Greek: Καρυάτις, plural: Καρυάτιδες) is a sculpted female figure serving as an architectural support taking the place of a column or a pillar supporting an entablature on her head
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Still Life
A still life (plural: still lifes) is a work of art depicting mostly inanimate subject matter, typically commonplace objects which are either natural (food, flowers, dead animals, plants, rocks, shells, etc.) or man-made (drinking glasses, books, vases, jewelry, coins, pipes, etc.).[1] With origins in the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and Ancient Greco-Roman
Greco-Roman
art, still-life painting emerged as a distinct genre and professional specialization in Western painting
Western painting
by the late 16th century, and has remained significant since then. A still-life form gives the artist more freedom in the arrangement of elements within a composition than do paintings of other types of subjects such as landscape or portraiture. Still life, as a particular genre, began with Netherlandish painting of the 16th and 17th centuries, and the English term still life derives from the Dutch word stilleven
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Marble
Marble
Marble
is a metamorphic rock composed of recrystallized carbonate minerals, most commonly calcite or dolomite. Marble
Marble
may be foliated. In geology the term "marble" refers to metamorphosed limestone, but its use in stonemasonry more broadly encompasses unmetamorphosed limestone.[1] Marble
Marble
is commonly used for sculpture and as a building material.Contents1 Etymology 2 Physical origins 3 Types 4 Uses4.1 Sculpture 4.2 Construction
Construction
marble5 Production5.1 Occupational safety5.1.1 United States6 Microbial degradation 7 Cultural associations 8 Artificial marble 9 Gallery 10 See also 11 References 12 External linksEtymologyCarlo Franzoni's sculptural marble chariot clock depicting Clio, the Greek muse of history. Marble
Marble
wall of Ruskeala
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Gypsum
Gypsum
Gypsum
is a soft sulfate mineral composed of calcium sulfate dihydrate, with the chemical formula CaSO4·2H2O.[3] It is widely mined and is used as a fertilizer, and as the main constituent in many forms of plaster, blackboard chalk and wallboard. A massive fine-grained white or lightly tinted variety of gypsum, called alabaster, has been used for sculpture by many cultures including Ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Ancient Rome, the Byzantine Empire
Byzantine Empire
and the Nottingham alabasters of Medieval England. Mohs scale of mineral hardness, based on scratch hardness comparison, defines hardness value 2 as gypsum
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National Museum, Warsaw
Tram: 7, 8, 9,22, 24, 25 Bus: 111, 117,158, 507, 517, 521 (Muzeum Narodowe) 116, 128, 195, 180, 222, 503 (Foksal)[1]Website www.mnw.art.plThe National Museum in Warsaw
Warsaw
(Polish: Muzeum Narodowe w Warszawie), popularly abbreviated as MNW, is a national museum in Warsaw, one of the largest museums in Poland
Poland
and the largest in the capital
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Polish American
Northeast (New York · New Jersey · Pennsylvania · Connecticut · Massachusetts) Midwest (Michigan · Illinois · Wisconsin · Ohio · Minnesota · Indiana · North Dakota)LanguagesEnglish ( American English
American English
dialects), PolishReligionPredominantly Roman Catholicism[2]Related ethnic groupsPoles, Other West Slavic Americans
Americans
(Czech Americans, Kashubian Americans, Silesian Americans, Slovak Americans, & Sorbian Americans)Polish Americans
Americans
are Americans
Americans
who have total or partial Polish ancestry. There are an estimated 9.5 million Polish Americans, representing about 3% of the U.S
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National Museum, Poznań
The National Museum, Poznań
Poznań
(Polish: Muzeum Narodowe w Poznaniu), Poland, popularly abbreviated as MNP, is a state-owned cultural institution and one of the largest museums in Poland. It houses a rich collection of Polish painting from the 16th century on, and a collection of foreign painting (Italian, Spanish, Dutch and German). The museum is also home to numismatic collections and a gallery of applied arts.Contents1 History 2 Collections2.1 Gallery of Foreign Painting3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The National Museum in Poznań
Poznań
was established in 1857, as the "Museum of Polish and Slavic Antiquities".[1] In 1894 the museum was renamed Provincial Museum of Posen. In 1902, the museum was renamed Kaiser-Friedrich-Museum
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National Museum, Kraków
The National Museum in Kraków
Kraków
(Polish: Muzeum Narodowe w Krakowie), popularly abbreviated as MNK, established in 1879, is the main branch of Poland's National Museum, which has several independent branches with permanent collections around the country. The Museum consists of 21 departments which are divided by art period; 11 galleries, 2 libraries, and 12 conservation workshops. It holds some 780,000 art objects, spanning from classical archeology to modern art, with special focus on Polish painting.[1][2]Contents1 Location 2 Collections2.1 Militaria 2.2 Decorative arts3 Museum Divisions 4 See also 5 Notes 6 ReferencesLocation[edit] Kraków
Kraków
National Museum was first housed at the upper floor of the Renaissance Sukiennice
Sukiennice
building located at the Main Square in the Kraków
Kraków
Old Town, now home to one of its most popular divisions in the city
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Yale University
Yale University
Yale University
is an American private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in New Haven, Connecticut. Founded in 1701, it is the third-oldest institution of higher education in the United States
United States
and one of the nine Colonial Colleges
Colonial Colleges
chartered before the American Revolution.[6] Chartered by Connecticut
Connecticut
Colony, the "Collegiate School" was established by clergy in Saybrook Colony
Saybrook Colony
to educate Congregational ministers. It moved to New Haven
New Haven
in 1716 and shortly after was renamed Yale College
Yale College
in recognition of a gift from British East India Company governor Elihu Yale
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Kosciuszko Foundation
Kosciuszko Foundation
Kosciuszko Foundation
is a charitable foundation based in New York City. It was created by Stephen Mizwa to fund programs that promote Polish-American intellectual and artistic exchange.Contents1 History 2 Activities 3 Washington, D.C. 4 Chapters 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The Polish American Scholarship Committee was established in 1923 by Dr. Stephen Mizwa to bring students to universities in the United States. Mizwa worked with the president of Vassar College, Henry Noble MacCracken, who had visited Poland. The two expanded the Scholarship Committee's mission to promote cultural and educational exchanges between the United States and Poland
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