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Gustav Landauer
Gustav Landauer
Gustav Landauer
(7 April 1870 – 2 May 1919) was one of the leading theorists on anarchism in Germany at the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century. He was an advocate of social anarchism and an avowed pacifist
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Anarcho-capitalism
Anarcho-capitalism
Anarcho-capitalism
is a political philosophy and school of anarchist thought that advocates the elimination of the state in favor of self-ownership, private property, and free markets. Anarcho-capitalists hold that, in the absence of statute (law by centralized decrees and legislation), society tends to contractually self-regulate and civilize through the discipline of the free market (in what its proponents describe as a "voluntary society").[1][2] In an anarcho-capitalist society, law enforcement, courts, and all other security services would be operated by privately funded competitors retained by private property owners rather than centrally through compulsory taxation. Money, along with all other goods and services, would be privately and competitively provided in an open market
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Munich
Munich
Munich
(/ˈmjuːnɪk/; German: München, pronounced [ˈmʏnçn̩] ( listen),[2] Austro-Bavarian: Minga [ˈmɪŋ(ː)ɐ]) is the capital and the most populated city in the German state of Bavaria, on the banks of the River Isar
Isar
north of the Bavarian Alps
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Affinity Group
An affinity group is a group formed around a shared interest or common goal, to which individuals formally or informally belong. Affinity groups are generally precluded from being under the aegis of any governmental agency, and their purposes must be primarily non-commercial. Examples of affinity groups include private social clubs, fraternities, writing or reading circles, hobby clubs, and groups engaged in political activism. Some affinity groups are organized in a non-hierarchical manner, often using consensus decision making, and are frequently made up of trusted friends. They provide a method of organization that is flexible and decentralized
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Antimilitarism
Antimilitarism
Antimilitarism
(also spelt anti-militarism) is a doctrine that opposes war, relying heavily on a critical theory of imperialism and was an explicit goal of the First and Second International. Whereas pacifism is the doctrine that disputes (especially between countries) should be settled without recourse to violence, Paul B
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Pacifism
Pacifism
Pacifism
is opposition to war, militarism, or violence. The word pacifism was coined by the French peace campaigner Émile Arnaud (1864–1921) and adopted by other peace activists at the tenth Universal Peace Congress
Universal Peace Congress
in Glasgow
Glasgow
in 1901.[1] A related term is ahimsa (to do no harm), which is a core philosophy in Buddhism
Buddhism
and Jainism. While modern connotations are recent, having been explicated since the 19th century, ancient references abound. In modern times, interest was revived by Leo Tolstoy
Leo Tolstoy
in his late works, particularly in The Kingdom of God Is Within You. Mohandas Gandhi (1869–1948) propounded the practice of steadfast nonviolent opposition which he called "satyagraha", instrumental in its role in the Indian Independence Movement
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Grand Duchy Of Baden
The Grand Duchy of Baden
Baden
(German: Großherzogtum Baden) was a state in the southwest German Empire
German Empire
on the east bank of the Rhine. It existed between 1806 and 1918.[1] It came into existence in the 12th century as the Margraviate
Margraviate
of Baden and subsequently split into different lines, which were unified in 1771. It then became the much-enlarged[1] Grand Duchy of Baden
Baden
through the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
in 1803–06 and was a sovereign country until it joined the German Empire
German Empire
in 1871, remaining a Grand Duchy until 1918 when it became part of the Weimar Republic
Weimar Republic
as the Republic of Baden
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Metaphysics
Metaphysics
Metaphysics
is a branch of philosophy that explores the fundamental questions, including the nature of concepts like being, existence, and reality.[1] It has two branches – cosmology and ontology. Traditional metaphysics seeks to answer, in a "suitably abstract and fully general manner", the questions:[2]What is there? And what is it like?Topics of metaphysical investigation include existence, objects and their properties, space and time, cause and effect, and possibility. A central branch of metaphysics is ontology, the investigation into the basic categories of being and how they relate to one another. There are two broad conceptions about what is the "world" studied by metaphysics. The strong, classical view assumes that the objects studied by metaphysics exist independently of any observer, so that the subject is the most fundamental of all sciences
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Religion
There is no scholarly consensus over what precisely constitutes a religion.[1][2] It may be defined as a cultural system of designated behaviors and practices, world views, texts, sanctified places, prophesies, ethics, or organizations, that relate humanity to the supernatural, transcendental, or spiritual. Different religions may or may not contain various elements ranging from the divine,[3] sacred things,[4] faith,[5] a supernatural being or supernatural beings[6] or "some sort of ultimacy and transcendence that will provide norms and power for the rest of life".[7] Religious practices may include rituals, sermons, commemoration or veneration (of deities), sacrifices, festivals, feasts, trances, initiations, funerary services, matrimonial services, meditation, prayer, music, art, dance, public service, or other aspects of human culture. Religions have sacred histories and narratives, which may be preserved in sacred scriptures, and symbols and holy places, that aim mostly to give a
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William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare
Shakespeare
(/ˈʃeɪkspɪər/; 26 April 1564 (baptised) – 23 April 1616)[a] was an English poet, playwright and actor, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist.[2][3][4] He is often called England's national poet and the "Bard of Avon".[5][b] His extant works, including collaborations, consist of approximately 39 plays,[c] 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems and a few other verses, some of uncertain authorship. His plays have been translated into every major living language and are performed more often than those of any other playwright.[7] Shakespeare
Shakespeare
was born and brought up in Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire. At the age of 18, he married Anne Hathaway, with whom he had three children: Susanna and twins Hamnet and Judith
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German Language
No official regulation ( German orthography
German orthography
regulated by the Council for German Orthography[4]). Language
Language
codesISO 639-1 deISO 639-2 ger
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Karlsruhe
Karlsruhe
Karlsruhe
(German pronunciation: [ˈkaɐ̯lsˌʁuːə] ( listen); formerly Carlsruhe[citation needed]) is the second-largest city in the state of Baden-Württemberg, in southwest Germany, near the French-German border. It has a population of 307,755. The city is the seat of the two highest courts in Germany: the Federal Constitutional Court and the Federal Court of Justice
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Postcolonial Anarchism
Post-colonial anarchism is a term coined by Roger White in response to his experience as an Anarchist
Anarchist
Person of Color in the anarchist movement in North America. Between 1994 and 2004 White wrote a series of essays reflecting on experiences in the anarchist movement. He identifies racial isolation and tokenism as important features of the experience of people of color in the anarchist movement and attributes this to the prevalence European universalism and an approach to class struggle as a binary relationship between workers and capitalists which does not take account of the cultural aspects of imperialism.[1] Post-colonial anarchism is an attempt to bring together disparate aspects and tendencies within the existing anarchist movement and re-envision them in an explicitly anti-imperialist framework
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Left Anarchism
The terms left anarchism and left-wing anarchism distinguish collectivist anarchism from laissez-faire anarchism and right-libertarian philosophies.[1][2] Left anarchists refer to philosophies which posit a future society in which private property is replaced by reciprocity and non-hierarchical society.[3][4] The term "left anarchism" is sometimes used synonymously with libertarian socialism,[5] left-libertarianism or social anarchism.[6] More traditional anarchists typically discourage the concept of "left-wing" theories of anarchism on grounds of redundancy, that it lends legitimacy to the notion that anarchism is compatible with capitalism[7][8] or nationalism.[9][10] Ulrike Heider, a syndicalist, categorized anarchism into left anarchism, right anarchism (anarcho-capitalism) and green anarchism.[11][page needed] See also[edit]Anarcho-capitalism Collectivist anarchism National-Anarchism Post-left anarchy Right-libertarianism Social anarchismReferences[edit]
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Post-left Anarchy
Post-left anarchy
Post-left anarchy
is a recent current in anarchist thought that promotes a critique of anarchism's relationship to traditional leftism. Some post-leftists seek to escape the confines of ideology in general while also presenting a critique of organizations and morality.[1] Influenced by the work of Max Stirner[1] and by the Situationist International,[1] post-left anarchy is marked by a focus on social insurrection and a rejection of leftist social organisation.[2] Post-leftists argue that the left, even the revolutionary left, is anachronistic and incapable of creating change. They claim post-left anarchy offers critiques of radical strategies and tactics which it considers antiquated: the demonstration, class-oriented struggle, focus on tradition, and the inability to escape the confines of history
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Anarcho-primitivism
Anarcho-primitivism
Anarcho-primitivism
is an anarchist critique of the origins and progress of civilization. According to anarcho-primitivism, the shift from hunter-gatherer to agricultural subsistence gave rise to social stratification, coercion, alienation, and overpopulation. Anarcho-primitivists advocate a return of non-"civilized" ways of life through deindustrialization, abolition of the division of labor or specialization, and abandonment of large-scale organization technologies. Many traditional anarchists reject the critique of civilization while some, such as Wolfi Landstreicher, endorse the critique but do not consider themselves anarcho-primitivists
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