HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Gunnar Heinsohn
Gunnar Heinsohn
Gunnar Heinsohn
is a German author, sociologist and economist and professor emeritus at the University of Bremen. He was born on November 21, 1943 in Gotenhafen (Gdynia, Poland) to Roswitha Heinsohn, née Maurer and the late Kriegsmarine
Kriegsmarine
Kapitänleutnant Heinrich Heinsohn, last serving on U-438
[...More...]

"Gunnar Heinsohn" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Germany
Coordinates: 51°N 9°E / 51°N 9°E / 51; 9Federal Republic
Republic
of Germany Bundesrepublik Deutschland (German)[a]FlagCoat of armsMotto:  "Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit" (de facto) "Unity and Justice and Freedom"Anthem: "Deutschlandlied" (third verse only)[b] "Song of Germany"Location of  Germany  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)Location of
[...More...]

"Germany" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Tom Bethell
Tom Bethell (/bəˈθɛl/; born July 17, 1936) is a journalist who writes mainly on economic and scientific issues, and is known for his writings on the market economy, political conservatism, and fringe science.Contents1 Life and career 2 Bibliography 3 References 4 External linksLife and career[edit] Bethell was born and raised in London,[1] England. He was educated at Downside School and Trinity College, Oxford. A resident of the District of Columbia, he has lived in Virginia, Louisiana, and California. He is married to Donna R. Fitzpatrick of Washington, D.C.[2][3][4] He is a senior editor of The American Spectator and was for 25 years a media fellow of the Hoover Institution. He was formerly Washington editor of Harper's, and an editor of the Washington Monthly.[5] Bethell was a member of the Group for the Scientific Reappraisal of the HIV-AIDS Hypothesis[6] which denies that HIV causes AIDS
[...More...]

"Tom Bethell" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Credit (finance)
Credit
Credit
(from Latin
Latin
credit, "(he/she/it) believes") is the trust which allows one party to provide money or resources to another party where that second party does not reimburse the first party immediately (thereby generating a debt), but instead promises either to repay or return those resources (or other materials of equal value) at a later date.[1] In other words, credit is a method of making reciprocity formal, legally enforceable, and extensible to a large group of unrelated people.[2] The resources provided may be financial (e.g. granting a loan), or they may consist of goods or services (e.g. consumer credit)
[...More...]

"Credit (finance)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Property
Property, in the abstract, is what belongs to or with something, whether as an attribute or as a component of said thing
[...More...]

"Property" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Contract Law
A contract is a voluntary arrangement between two or more parties that is enforceable by law as a binding legal agreement. Contract
Contract
law recognises and governs the rights and duties arising from agreements.[1] Within jurisdictions of the civil law tradition, contract law is a branch of the law of obligations. At common law, formation of a contract generally requires an offer, acceptance, consideration, and a mutual intent to be bound
[...More...]

"Contract Law" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Legal Liability
In law, liable means "[r]esponsible or answerable in law; legally obligated."[1] Legal liability concerns both civil law and criminal law and can arise from various areas of law, such as contracts, torts, taxes, or fines given by government agencies. The claimant is the one who seeks to establish, or prove, liability. Claimants can prove liability through a myriad of different theories, known as theories of liability. Which theories of liability are available in a given case depends on nature of the law in question
[...More...]

"Legal Liability" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Collateral (finance)
In lending agreements, collateral is a borrower's pledge of specific property to a lender, to secure repayment of a loan.[1][2] The collateral serves as a lender's protection against a borrower's default and so can be used to offset the loan if the borrower fails to pay the principal and interest satisfactorily under the terms of the lending agreement. The protection that collateral provides generally allows lenders to offer a lower interest rate on loans that have collateral compared to those without collateral because the risk of loss to the lender is lower. The reduction in interest rate can be up to several percentage points, depending on the type and value of the collateral
[...More...]

"Collateral (finance)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Central Bank
A central bank, reserve bank, or monetary authority is an institution that manages a state's currency, money supply, and interest rates. Central banks also usually oversee the commercial banking system of their respective countries. In contrast to a commercial bank, a central bank possesses a monopoly on increasing the monetary base in the state, and usually also prints the national currency,[1] which usually serves as the state's legal tender. Central banks also act as a "lender of last resort" to the banking sector during times of financial crisis
[...More...]

"Central Bank" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Bank Notes
A banknote (often known as a bill, paper money, or simply a note) is a type of negotiable promissory note, made by a bank, payable to the bearer on demand. Banknotes were originally issued by commercial banks, who were legally required to redeem the notes for legal tender (usually gold or silver coin) when presented to the chief cashier of the originating bank. These commercial banknotes only traded at face value in the market served by the issuing bank.[2] Commercial banknotes have primarily been replaced by national banknotes issued by central banks. National banknotes are generally legal tender, meaning that medium of payment is allowed by law or recognized by a legal system to be valid for meeting a financial obligation.[3] Historically, banks sought to ensure that they could always pay customers in coins when they presented banknotes for payment
[...More...]

"Bank Notes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Mercantilism
Mercantilism
Mercantilism
is a national economic policy designed to maximize the trade of a nation and, historically, to maximize the accumulation of gold and silver.[citation needed] Mercantilism
Mercantilism
was dominant in modernized parts of Europe from the 16th to the 18th centuries[1] before falling into decline, although some commentators argue[2] that it is still practised in the economies of industrializing countries in the form of neomercantilism. It promotes governmental regulation of a nation's economy for the purpose of augmenting state power at the expense of rival national powers. Mercantilism
Mercantilism
includes a national economic policy aimed at accumulating monetary reserves through a positive balance of trade, especially of finished goods
[...More...]

"Mercantilism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Hernando De Soto (economist)
Hernando de Soto
Hernando de Soto
Polar (or Hernando de Soto; born 1941) is a Peruvian economist known for his work on the informal economy and on the importance of business and property rights. He is the president of the Institute for Liberty and Democracy (ILD), located in Lima, Peru.[1]Contents1 Childhood and education 2 Reforms in Peru
Peru
and elsewhere 3 Main thesis 4 Work and research4.1 De Soto applies thesis to terrorism 4.2 De Soto challenges Thomas Piketty
Thomas Piketty
and approaches Pope Francis5 Blockchain work 6 Praise for work 7 Prizes7.1 World Justice Project8 Criticism and responses 9 Publications9.1 Books 9.2 Articles10 See also 11 References 12 External linksChildhood and education[edit] Hernando de Soto
Hernando de Soto
was born on 2 June 1941 in Arequipa, Peru. His father was a Peruvian diplomat
[...More...]

"Hernando De Soto (economist)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Richard Pipes
Fiona Hill Arthur WaldronRichard Edgar Pipes (born July 11, 1923) is a Polish-American academic who specializes in Russian history, particularly with respect to the Soviet Union, who espoused a strong anti-communist point of view throughout his career. In 1976 he headed Team B, a team of analysts organized by the Central Intelligence Agency
Central Intelligence Agency
who analyzed the strategic capacities and goals of the Soviet military and political leadership. Pipes is the father of American historian and expert on American foreign policy and the Middle East, Daniel Pipes. Pipes was born to a Jewish
Jewish
family in Cieszyn, Poland, which fled the country as refugees after it was invaded by Nazi Germany. Settling in the United States in 1940, he became a naturalized citizen in 1943 while serving in the United States Army Air Corps
[...More...]

"Richard Pipes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Sociology
Sociology
Sociology
is the scientific study of society, including patterns of social relationships, social interaction, and culture.[1][2][3] It is a social science that uses various methods of empirical investigation[4] and critical analysis[5] to develop a body of knowledge about social order, acceptance, and change. Many sociologists aim to conduct research that may be applied directly to social policy and welfare, while others focus primarily on refining the theoretical understanding of social processes. Subject matter ranges from the micro-sociology level of individual agency and interaction to the macro level of systems and the social structure.[6] The traditional focuses of sociology include social stratification, social class, social mobility, religion, secularization, law, sexuality, gender, and deviance
[...More...]

"Sociology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Eurosystem
The Eurosystem
Eurosystem
is the monetary authority of the eurozone, the collective of European Union member states
European Union member states
that have adopted the euro as their sole official currency. The ECB has, under Article 16 of its Statute,[1] the exclusive right to authorise the issuance of euro banknotes. Member states can issue euro coins, but the amount must be authorised by the ECB beforehand. The Eurosystem
Eurosystem
consists of the European Central Bank
European Central Bank
and the national central banks (NCB) of the 19 member states that are part of the eurozone
[...More...]

"Eurosystem" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Economic Anthropology
Economic anthropology
Economic anthropology
is a field that attempts to explain human economic behavior in its widest historic, geographic and cultural scope. It is practiced by anthropologists and has a complex relationship with the discipline of economics, of which it is highly critical.[1] Its origins as a sub-field of anthropology began with work by the Polish founder of anthropology Bronislaw Malinowski
Bronislaw Malinowski
and the French Marcel Mauss on the nature of reciprocity as an alternative to market exchange. For the most part, studies in economic anthropology focus on exchange. In contrast, the Marxian school known as "political economy" focuses on production. Post- World
World
War II, economic anthropology was highly influenced by the work of economic historian Karl Polanyi
[...More...]

"Economic Anthropology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.