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Gunboat
A gunboat is a naval watercraft designed for the express purpose of carrying one or more guns to bombard coastal targets, as opposed to those military craft designed for naval warfare, or for ferrying troops or supplies.Contents1 History1.1 Pre-steam era 1.2 Steam era 1.3 World War II1.3.1 United Kingdom 1.3.2 United States 1.3.3 Soviet Union1.4 Vietnam War2 See also 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Pre-steam era[edit] In the age of sail, a gunboat was usually a small undecked vessel carrying a single smoothbore cannon in the bow, or just two or three such cannons
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St. Lawrence River
The Saint Lawrence River
River
(French: Fleuve Saint-Laurent; Tuscarora: Kahnawáʼkye;[3] Mohawk: Kaniatarowanenneh, meaning "big waterway") is a large river in the middle latitudes of North America. The Saint Lawrence River
River
flows in a roughly north-easterly direction, connecting the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
with the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
and forming the primary drainage outflow of the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
Basin. It traverses the Canadian provinces of Quebec
Quebec
and Ontario, and is part of the international boundary between Ontario, Canada, and the U.S. state
U.S. state
of New York
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Napoleon's Invasion Of England
Napoleon's planned invasion of the United Kingdom at the start of the War of the Third Coalition, although never carried out, was a major influence on British naval strategy and the fortification of the coast of southeast England. French attempts to invade Ireland in order to destabilise the United Kingdom or as a stepping-stone to Great Britain had already occurred in 1796. The first French Army of England had gathered on the Channel coast in 1798, but an invasion of England was sidelined by Napoleon's concentration on campaigns in Egypt and against Austria, and shelved in 1802 by the Peace of Amiens
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Tonne
The tonne (/tʌn/ ( listen)) (Non-SI unit, symbol: t), commonly referred to as the metric ton in the United States, is a non-SI metric unit of mass equal to 1,000 kilograms;[1][2][3][4] or one megagram (Mg); it is equivalent to approximately 2,204.6 pounds,[5] 1.102 short tons (US) or 0.984 long tons (imperial). Although not part of the SI, the tonne is accepted for use with SI units and prefixes by the International Committee for Weights and Measures.[6]Contents1 Symbol and abbreviations 2 Origin and spelling 3 Conversions 4 Derived units 5 Alternative usage5.1 Use of mass as proxy for energy 5.2 Unit of force6 See also 7 Notes and references 8 External linksSymbol and abbreviations[edit] The SI symbol for the tonne is "t", adopted at the same time as the unit in 1879.[2] Its use is also official for the metric ton in the United States, having been adopted by the United States National Institute of Standards and Technology.[7] It
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Long Ton
Long ton,[1] also known as the imperial ton or displacement ton,[1][2] is the name for the unit called the "ton" in the avoirdupois or Imperial system of measurements. It was standardised in the thirteenth century and is used in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and several other British Commonwealth of Nations
Commonwealth of Nations
countries alongside the mass-based metric tonne defined in 1799. It is not to be confused with the short ton a unit of weight equal to 2,000 pounds (907.18474 kg) used in the United States and in Canada before metrication also referred to simply as a "ton".Contents1 Unit definition 2 Unit equivalences 3 International usage 4 See also 5 ReferencesUnit definition[edit] A long ton is defined as exactly 2,240 pounds
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Turku
Turku
Turku
(Finnish pronunciation: [ˈturku] ( listen); Swedish: Åbo [ˈoːbʊ] ( listen)) is a city on the southwest coast of Finland
Finland
at the mouth of the Aura River,[8][9] in the region of Southwest Finland. Turku, as a town, was settled during the 13th century and founded most likely at the end of the 13th century, making it the oldest city in Finland. It quickly became the most important city in Finland, a status it retained for hundreds of years
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Kiel
Kiel
Kiel
(German: [ˈkiːl] ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city in the northern German state of Schleswig-Holstein, with a population of 249,023 (2016). Kiel
Kiel
lies approximately 90 kilometres (56 mi) north of Hamburg. Due to its geographic location in the north of Germany, the southeast of the Jutland
Jutland
peninsula and the southwestern shore of the Baltic Sea, Kiel
Kiel
has become one of the major maritime centres of Germany. For instance, the city is known for a variety of international sailing events, including the annual Kiel
Kiel
Week, which is the biggest sailing event in the world
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French Frigate Minerve (1794)
Minerve was a 40-gun Minerve-class frigate of the French Navy. The British captured her twice and the French recaptured her once. She therefore served under four names before being broken up in 1814:Minerve, 1794–1795 HMS Minerve, 1795–1803 Canonnière, 1803–1810 HMS Confiance, 1810–1814Contents1 French service as Minerve 2 British service as HMS Minerve2.1 French Revolutionary Wars 2.2 Napoleonic Wars3 French service as Canonnière 4 Capture and British service as HMS Confiance 5 Citations and references5.1 Citations 5.2 References6 External linksFrench service as Minerve[edit] Her keel was laid in January 1792, and she was launched in 1794. On 14 December, off the island of Ivica, she captured the collier Hannibal, which was sailing from Liverpool to Naples. However, eleven days later, HMS Tartar recaptured Hannibal off Toulon and sent her into Corsica.[2] Minerve took part in combat off Noli
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Rebellions Of 1837
Government victoryPatriote rebellion crushed by loyalist forces; Republic of Canada dismantled Defeat of Hunters' Lodges Unification of Upper and Lower Canada
Canada
into the Province of CanadaBelligerents Lower Canada Château Clique Patriotes Republic of Lower Canada Upper Canada Family Compact Hunters' Lodges Republic of CanadaCommanders and leadersJohn Colborne, 1st Baron Seaton Francis Bond Head James FitzGibbon George Gurnett Henry Dundas Allan MacNab Charles Stephen Gore George Augustus Wetherall Louis Joseph Papineau William Lyon Mackenzie Thomas Storrow Brown
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Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
(April 13 [O.S. April 2] 1743 – July 4, 1826) was an American Founding Father who was the principal author of the Declaration of Independence and later served as the third President of the United States
President of the United States
from 1801 to 1809. Previously, he was elected the second Vice President of the United States, serving under John Adams
John Adams
from 1797 to 1801. A proponent of democracy, republicanism, and individual rights motivating American colonists to break from Great Britain and form a new nation, he produced formative documents and decisions at both the state and national level. He was a land owner and farmer. Jefferson was primarily of English ancestry, born and educated in colonial Virginia. He graduated from the College of William & Mary and briefly practiced law, at times defending slaves seeking their freedom
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Democratic-Republican Party
The Democratic-Republican Party
Democratic-Republican Party
was an American political party formed by Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
and James Madison
James Madison
between 1791 and 1793 to oppose the centralizing policies of the new Federalist Party
Federalist Party
run by Alexander Hamilton, who was secretary of the treasury and chief architect of George Washington's administration.[5] From 1801 to 1825, the new party controlled the presidency and Congress as well as most states during the First Party System. It began in 1791 as one faction in Congress and included many politicians who had been opposed to the new constitution. They called themselves "Republicans" after their ideology, republicanism. They distrusted the Federalist commitment to republicanism
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War Of 1812
Treaty of GhentMilitary stalemate; both sides' invasion attempts repulsed Status quo ante bellum Defeat of Tecumseh's ConfederacyBelligerents United StatesChoctaw Cherokee Creeks British Empire United Kingdom  The Canadas Tecumseh's Confederacy[1] Shawnee Creek Red Sticks Ojibwe Fox Iroquois Miami Mingo Ottawa Kickapoo Delaware (Lenape) Mascouten Potawatomi Sauk Wyandot Bourbon Spain Florida (1814)Commanders and leaders James Madison Henry Dearborn Jacob Brown Winfield Scott Andrew Jackson William Henry Harrison William H. Winder (POW) William Hull  (POW) Zebulon Pike † Oliver Hazard Perry Isaac Chauncey George, Prince Regent Lord Liverpool Sir George Prévost Sir Isaac Brock † Gordon Drummond Charles de Salaberry Roger Hale Sheaffe Robert Ross † Edward Pakenham † James FitzGibbon Alexander Cochrane James Lucas Yeo Tecumseh †StrengthU.S
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USS Michigan (1843)
USS Michigan was the United States Navy's first iron-hulled warship and served during the American Civil War. She was renamed USS Wolverine in 1905.[1]Contents1 Construction and design 2 Early career 3 American Civil War 4 Later U.S. Navy service 5 Pennsylvania Naval Militia service 6 Relic 7 References 8 Bibliography 9 External linksConstruction and design[edit] The side wheel steamer Michigan was built in response to the British Government arming two steamers in response to the Canadian rebellions in the late 1830s with Secretary of the Navy Abel P
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Propeller
A propeller is a type of fan that transmits power by converting rotational motion into thrust. A pressure difference is produced between the forward and rear surfaces of the airfoil-shaped blade, and a fluid (such as air or water) is accelerated behind the blade. Propeller
Propeller
dynamics, like those of aircraft wings, can be modelled by either or both Bernoulli's principle
Bernoulli's principle
and Newton's third law. A marine propeller of this type is sometimes colloquially known as a screw propeller or screw, however there is a different class of propellers known as cycloidal propellers – they are characterized by the higher propulsive efficiency averaging 0.72 compared to the screw propeller's average of 0.6 and the ability to throw thrust in any direction at any time
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