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Guldbagge Award For Best Actor In A Leading Role
In typography, leading (/ˈlɛdɪŋ/ LED-ing) refers to the distance between the baselines of successive lines of type. The term originated in the days of hand-typesetting, when thin strips of lead were inserted into the forms to increase the vertical distance between lines of type. The term is still used in modern page-layout software such as QuarkXPress
QuarkXPress
and Adobe InDesign. In consumer-oriented word-processing software, this concept is usually referred to as "line spacing" or "interline spacing".Contents1 Origins 2 Practices 3 Issues 4 Examples 5 On the World Wide Web 6 Feathering 7 Bastard fonts 8 See also 9 ReferencesOrigins[edit] The word comes from lead strips that were put between set lines of lead type, hence the pronunciation "ledding" and not "leeding"
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Leeds
Leeds
Leeds
/liːdz/ ( listen)[5] is a city in West Yorkshire, England. Historically in Yorkshire's West Riding, Leeds
Leeds
can be traced to the 5th century name for a wooded area of the Kingdom of Elmet. The name has been applied to many administrative entities over the centuries. It changed from being the name of a small manorial borough in the 13th century, through several incarnations, to being the name attached to the present metropolitan borough
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Paragraph
A paragraph (from the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
παράγραφος paragraphos, "to write beside" or "written beside") is a self-contained unit of a discourse in writing dealing with a particular point or idea. Though not required by the syntax of any language, paragraphs are usually an expected part of formal writing, used to organize longer prose.Contents1 History 2 Typographical considerations 3 In computing 4 Numbering 5 Section breaks 6 Purpose and style advice 7 See also 8 Notes 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit] The oldest classical Greek and Latin writing had little or no space between words and could be written in boustrophedon (alternating directions). Over time, text direction (left to right) became standardized, and word dividers and terminal punctuation became common
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University Of Chicago Press
The University of Chicago
University of Chicago
Press is the largest and one of the oldest university presses in the United States.[3] It is operated by the University of Chicago
University of Chicago
and publishes a wide
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Page (paper)
A page is one side of a leaf (or sheet) of paper, parchment or other material (or electronic media) in a book, magazine, newspaper, or other collection of sheets, on which text or illustrations can be printed, written or drawn, to create documents. It can be used as a measure of communicating general quantity of information ("That topic covers twelve pages") or more specific quantity ("there are 535 words in a standard page in standard font type")[1]Contents1 The page in typography 2 The page in English lexicon 3 The page in library science 4 The printed page in computing4.1 Printed page in Web5 ReferencesThe page in typography[edit] In a book, the side of a leaf one reads first is called the recto page, and the back side of that leaf is called the verso page. In a spread, one reads the verso page first and then reads the recto page of the next leaf. In English-language books, the recto page is on the right and the verso page is on the left
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Canons Of Page Construction
The canons of page construction are a set of principles in the field of book design used to describe the ways that page proportions, margins and type areas (print spaces) of books are constructed. The notion of canons, or laws of form, of book page construction was popularized by Jan Tschichold
Jan Tschichold
in the mid to late twentieth century, based on the work of J. A. van de Graaf, Raúl M. Rosarivo, Hans Kayser, and others.[1] Tschichold wrote, “Though largely forgotten today, methods and rules upon which it is impossible to improve have been developed for centuries
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Column (typography)
In typography, a column is one or more vertical blocks of content positioned on a page, separated by gutters (vertical whitespace) or rules (thin lines, in this case vertical). Columns are most commonly used to break up large bodies of text that cannot fit in a single block of text on a page. Additionally, columns are used to improve page composition and readability. Newspapers very frequently use complex multi-column layouts to break up different stories and longer bodies of texts within a story. Column can also more generally refer to the vertical delineations created by a typographic grid system which type and image may be positioned. In page layout, the whitespace on the outside of the page (bounding the first and last columns) are known as margins; the gap between two facing pages is also considered a gutter, since there are columns on both sides
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Even Working
Even working is a term used in book publishing that means the number of pages in a book is divisible by the number 16 or 32.[1] A book with 256, 272 or 288 pages, for instance, is an "even working", whilst a book with 254 or 286 pages is not. The significance of 16 or 32, which form the individual "signatures" of which a book is composed, is that they make the most efficient use of the paper used in the printing of a book.[1] If the number of printed pages in a book is, for example, 258, then the editor will attempt to move material from the two extra pages so that there will not be 14 blank pages at the end of the book (the next even working after 256 being 272 pages). References[edit]^ a b R. M. Ritter, The Oxford Guide to Style, OUP, 2002, p
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Margin (typography)
In typography, a margin is the area between the main content of a page and the page edges.[1] The margin helps to define where a line of text begins and ends. When a page is justified the text is spread out to be flush with the left and right margins. When two pages of content are combined next to each other (known as a two-page spread), the space between the two pages is known as the gutter.[2] (Any space between columns of text is a gutter.) The top and bottom margins of a page are also called "head" and "foot", respectively. The term "margin" can also be used to describe the edge of internal content, such as the right or left edge of a column of text.[3] Marks made in the margins are called marginalia.Contents1 History1.1 The Scroll 1.2 The Codex 1.3 The Printed Book 1.4 The Digital Page2 ReferencesHistory[edit] The Scroll[edit] Margins are an important method of organizing the written word, and have a long history
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Page Numbering
Page numbering
Page numbering
is the process of applying a sequence of numbers (or letters, or roman numerals) to the pages of a book or other document. The number itself, which may appear in various places on the page, can be referred to as a page number or as a folio.[1] Like other numbering schemes such as chapter numbering, page numbers allow the citation of a particular page of the numbered document and facilitates to the reader to find specific parts of the document and to know the size of the complete text (by checking the number of the last page).Contents1 Numbering conventions 2 Electronic documents 3 Manuscripts 4 References 5 See alsoNumbering conventions[edit] Even numbers usually appear on verso pages, while odd numbers appear on recto pages
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Pagination
Pagination
Pagination
is the process of dividing a document into discrete pages, either electronic pages or printed pages. In reference to books produced without a computer, pagination can mean the consecutive page numbering to indicate the proper order of the pages, which was rarely found in documents pre-dating 1500, and only became common practice c. 1550, when it replaced foliation, which numbered only the front sides of folios.Contents1 Pagination
Pagination
in word processing, desktop publishing, and digital typesetting 2 Pagination
Pagination
in print 3 Pagination
Pagination
in electronic display 4 Presentation
Presentation
vs
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Pull Quote
In graphic design, a pull quote (also known as a lift-out pull quote) is a key phrase, quotation, or excerpt that has been pulled from an article and used as a page layout graphic element, serving to entice readers into the article or to highlight a key topic. It is typically placed in a larger or distinctive typeface and on the same page. Pull quotes are often used in magazine and newspaper articles, annual reports, and brochures, as well as on the web. They can add visual interest to text-heavy pages with few images or illustrations.[1] Placement of a pull quote on a page may be defined in a publication's or website's style guide. Such a typographic device may or may not be aligned with a column on the page. Some designers, for example, choose not to align the quote. In that case, the quotation cuts into two or more columns, as in the example shown
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Recto And Verso
The terms recto and verso refer to the text written or printed on the "right" or "front" side and on the "back" side of a leaf of paper in a bound item such as a codex, book, broadsheet, or pamphlet. The terms are shortened from Latin rectō foliō and versō foliō, translating to "on the right side of the leaf" and "on the back side of the leaf", respectively. The two opposite pages themselves are called folium rectum and folium versum in Latin,[1] and the ablative recto, verso already imply that the text on the page (and not the physical page itself) are referred to. In codicology, each physical sheet (folium, abbreviated fol. or f.) of a manuscript is numbered and the sides are referred to as rectum and folium versum, abbreviated as r and v respectively. Editions of manuscripts will thus mark the position of text in the original manuscript in the form fol
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Typographic Alignment
In typesetting and page layout, alignment or range is the setting of text flow or image placement relative to a page, column (measure), table cell, or tab. The type alignment setting is sometimes referred to as text alignment, text justification, or type justification
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Widows And Orphans
In typesetting, widows and orphans are lines at the beginning or end of a paragraph, which are left dangling at the top or bottom of a column, separated from the rest of the paragraph
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