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Guardian Prize
The Guardian
The Guardian
Children's Fiction Prize or Guardian Award is a literary award that annually recognises one fiction book written for children or young adults (at least age eight) and published in the United Kingdom. It is conferred upon the author of the book by The Guardian newspaper, which established it in 1965 and inaugurated it in 1967. It is a lifetime award in that previous winners are not eligible. At least since 2000 the prize is £1,500. The shortlist of no more than four books and the winner are selected by three children's fiction writers, almost always including the latest winner. The Guardian
The Guardian
calls it the only children's book award winner selected by peers
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Guardian First Book Award
The Guardian
The Guardian
First Book Award was a literary award presented by The Guardian newspaper. It annually recognised one book by a new writer. It was established in 1999, replacing the Guardian Fiction Award or Guardian Fiction Prize that the newspaper had sponsored from 1965.[1] The Guardian
The Guardian
First Book Award was discontinued in 2016, with the 2015 awards being the last.[2]Contents1 History 2 Winners and shortlists 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The newspaper determined to change its book award after 1998, and during that year also hired Claire Armitstead as literary editor. At the inaugural First Book Award ceremony in 1999, she said that she was informed of the change, details to be arranged, by the head of the marketing department during her second week on the job. "By the time we left the room we had decided on two key things
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Hodder Children's Books
Hodder & Stoughton is a British publishing house, now an imprint of Hachette.Contents1 History1.1 Early history 1.2 Post-war years 1.3 21st century2 Non-fiction and imprints2.1 Flipback 2.2 Imprints3 Notable publications 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksHistory[edit] Early history[edit] The firm has its origins in the 1840s, with Matthew Hodder's employment, aged fourteen, with Messrs Jackson and Walford, the official publisher for the Congregational Union. In 1861 the firm became Jackson, Walford and Hodder; but in 1868 Jackson and Walford retired, and Thomas Wilberforce Stoughton joined the firm, creating Hodder & Stoughton. Hodder & Stoughton published both religious and secular works, and its religious list contained some progressive titles. These included George Adam Smith's Isaiah for its Expositor’s Bible series, which was one of the earliest texts to identify multiple authorship in the Book of Isaiah
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Andersen Press
Andersen Press is a British book publishing company. It was founded in 1976 by Klaus Flugge, and was named after Hans Christian Andersen. Random House has a holding in the company and has a strong association with Andersen.[1][2] The first book on the list was Goldilocks and the Three Bears by the then newly discovered Tony Ross, who wrote the popular children's series The Little Princess. The Andersen Press list now consists of over 1000 published titles, the majority of which are still in print. Andersen Press specialises in picture books and children’s fiction and the authors that it publishes include Melvin Burgess, Max Velthuijs, Ralph Steadman, Quentin Blake, Jeanne Willis and Emma Chichester Clark
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Wendy Lamb Books
Random House is an American book publisher and the largest general-interest paperback publisher in the world.[1][2][3] As of 2013, it is part of Penguin Random House, which is jointly owned by German media conglomerate Bertelsmann and British global education and publishing company Pearson PLC.Contents1 History1.1 Early history 1.2 Acquisition by Bertelsmann 1.3 Merger with Penguin2 Organization2.1 Headquarters 2.2 Imprints 2.3 International branches3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Early history[edit] Random House was founded in 1925 by Americans Bennett Cerf and Donald Klopfer, two years after they acquired the Modern Library imprint from publisher Horace Liveright, which reprints classic works of literature
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British Commonwealth
The Commonwealth
Commonwealth
of Nations[2] (formerly the British Commonwealth),[3][1] also known as simply the Commonwealth, is an intergovernmental organisation of 53 member states that are mostly former territories of the British Empire.[4] The Commonwealth
Commonwealth
operates by intergovernmental consensus of the member states, organised through the Commonwealth Secretariat and non-governmental organisations, organised through the Commonwealth
Commonwealth
Foundation.[5] The Commonwealth
Commonwealth
dates back to the mid-20th century with the decolonisation of the British Empire
British Empire
through increased self-governance of its territories
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Constable & Robinson
Constable & Robinson Ltd. is an imprint of Little, Brown which publishes fiction and non-fiction books and ebooks. Founded in Edinburgh in 1795 by Archibald Constable
Archibald Constable
as Constable & Co., and by Nick Robinson as Robinson Publishing Ltd in 1983, is an imprint of Little, Brown, which is owned by Hachette.Contents1 History 2 Awards 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Constable & Co. was founded in 1795 by Archibald Constable, and became Sir Walter Scott's publisher. In 1897 Constable published the most famous horror novel ever published, Bram Stoker's The Un-Dead, albeit with a last minute title change to Dracula. In 1813, the company was the first to give an author advance against royalties
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Booktrust
BookTrust is an independent British literacy charity based in London, England. The charity works across England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Book Trust was founded in 1921 by Hugh Walpole, Stanley Unwin, and Maurice Marston and Harold Macmillan. Its current Chief Executive is Diana Gerald, who took over from Viv Bird in early 2015. The charity’s aims are to transform lives through reading. Book Trust’s various book-gifting programmes are offered to children aged 0–16 years. In 2016-17, BookTrust gifted over 2.5 million book packs to children
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Alex Wheatle
Alex Alphonso Wheatle MBE (3 January 1963) is an award-winning black British novelist of Jamaican heritage, sentenced to a term of imprisonment after the Brixton riots.Contents1 Biography 2 Awards and honours 3 Bibliography 4 ReferencesBiography[edit] Born in 1963 to Jamaican parents,[1] Wheatle spent much of his childhood in a Shirley Oaks children's home. At 16 he was a founder member of the Crucial Rocker sound system; his DJ name was Yardman Irie. He wrote lyrics about everyday Brixton life. By 1980 Wheatle was living in a social services hostel in Brixton, South London, and he participated in the 1981 Brixton riots and aftermath. While serving his resulting sentence he read authors such as Chester Himes, Richard Wright, C. L. R. James and John Steinbeck
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David Almond
David Almond
David Almond
FRSL (born 15 May 1951) is a British author who has written several novels for children and young adults from 1998, each one receiving critical acclaim. He is one of thirty children's writers, and one of three from the U.K., to win the biennial, international Hans Christian Andersen Award, "the world's most prestigious prize in children's literature".[1][2] For the 70th anniversary of the British Carnegie Medal in 2007, his debut novel
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A Song For Ella Grey
A Song for Ella Grey is a 2014 young adult novel, written by David Almond and illustrated by Karen Radford
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Andy Mulligan (author)
Andy Mulligan is an English writer best known for young adult fiction. His work is strongly influenced by his experiences working as a volunteer in Calcutta, India, and as an English and drama teacher in Brazil, Vietnam, the Philippines, and the UK.[1]Contents1 Career 2 Works 3 Awards 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksCareer[edit] Mulligan's first novel, Ribblestrop, was published by Simon & Schuster in 2009. The story originated "on a walk with a fellow teacher"; they talked about they might turn a particular "ramshackle stately home ... into a thoroughly inappropriate school".[2] His second novel, Trash, is set in the garbage dump of a large unnamed third world city reminiscent of Manila, and features a street child who lives as a waste picker
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Paul Torday
Paul Torday /ˈtɔːrˌdeɪ/ (1 August 1946 – 18 December 2013)[1] was a British writer and the author of the comic novel, Salmon Fishing in the Yemen. The book was the winner of the 2007 Bollinger Everyman Wodehouse Prize for comic writing [2] and was serialised on BBC Radio 4. It won the Waverton Good Read Award in 2008. It was made into a popular movie in 2011, starring Ewan McGregor
Ewan McGregor
and Emily Blunt.Contents1 Life 2 Bibliography2.1 Novels3 See also 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] Born in 1946 in Croxdale, County Durham,[3] and educated at the Royal Grammar School, Newcastle and Pembroke College, Oxford, Torday turned to fiction writing only later in life, and his first novel was published at the age of 59. Prior to that he was a successful businessman living in Northumberland. The inspiration for the novel stemmed from Torday's interest in both fly fishing and the Middle East
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Simon & Schuster
Simon & Schuster, Inc. (/ˈʃuːstər/), a subsidiary of CBS Corporation, is an American publishing company founded in New York City in 1924 by Richard Simon and Max Schuster. As of 2016, Simon & Schuster publishes 2,000 titles annually under 35 different imprints.[2][3]Contents1 History1.1 Early years 1.2 Expansion 1.3 Corporate ownership 1.4 1980s 1.5 1990s 1.6 2000s 1.7 2010s2 Notable people2.1 Notable editors and publishers 2.2 Notable authors3 Logo 4 Imprints4.1 Adult publishing 4.2 Children's publishing 4.3 Audio 4.4 Former imprints5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 Further readingHistory[edit]Middle 20th century HQ, BroadwayEarly years[edit] In 1924, Richard Simon's aunt, a crossword puzzle enthusiast, asked whether there was a book of New York World
New York World
crossword puzzles, which were very popular at the time
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Ghost Hunter (Paver Novel)
Ghost Hunter is the sixth and last book in the Chronicles of Ancient Darkness series written by British author Michelle Paver. The book was released on 20 August 2009 in the United Kingdom,[1] ending the series that began in 2004 with the publication of Wolf Brother.Contents1 Plot summary 2 Background2.1 Writing 2.2 Cover3 Setting 4 ReferencesPlot summary[edit] Ghost hunter is the final adventure. Set in the high mountains, it tells of Torak's battle against the most fearsome of all the Soul-Eaters, Eosta the Eagle Owl Mage, who seeks to rule both the living and the dead, using the Fire Opal. As winter approaches and Souls' Night draws near, the Eagle Owl Mage holds the clans in the grip of terror. To fulfil his destiny, Torak must seek her lair in the Mountain of Ghosts. He must defy demons and tokoroths, and find his way through the Gorge of the Hidden People. Wolf must overcome terrible grief. Renn must make an agonizing decision
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Orion Publishing Group
Orion Publishing Group
Orion Publishing Group
Ltd. is a UK-based book publisher. It is owned by Hachette Livre. In 1998 Orion bought Cassell.[1]Contents1 Imprints 2 Distribution 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksImprints[edit] The group's imprints include:[2]Allen & Unwin Cassell Military Paperbacks Cassell's National Library J. M. Dent (Everyman Classics) Indigo (YA imprint) Millennium Orion Audiobooks Orion Books Orion Children's Books Orion Paperbacks Phoenix Books Trapeze Victor Gollancz Ltd Weidenfeld & NicolsonThe group also distributes books for the independent Halban Publishers. Distribution[edit] Books distributed through Littlehampton book services.[3] See also[edit]List of largest UK book publishers UK children's book publishersReferences[edit]^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2008-09-30. Retrieved 2008-09-08.  ^ "Imprints"
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