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Guard Interval
In telecommunications, guard intervals are used to ensure that distinct transmissions do not interfere with one another, or otherwise cause overlapping transmissions
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Telecommunications
Telecommunication
Telecommunication
is the transmission of signs, signals, messages, words, writings, images and sounds or information of any nature by wire, radio, optical or other electromagnetic systems.[1][2] Telecommunication
Telecommunication
occurs when the exchange of information between communication participants includes the use of technology. It is transmitted either electrically over physiical media, such as cables, or via electromagnetic radiation.[3][4][5][6][7][8] Such transmission paths are often divided into communication channels which afford the advantages of multiplexing
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Frame (networking)
A frame is a digital data transmission unit in computer networking and telecommunication. In packet switched systems, a frame is a simple container for a single network packet. In other telecommunications systems, a frame is a repeating structure supporting time-division multiplexing. A frame typically includes frame synchronization features consisting of a sequence of bits or symbols that indicate to the receiver, the beginning, and end of the payload data within the stream of symbols or bits it receives. If a receiver is connected to the system in the middle of a frame transmission, it ignores the data until it detects a new frame synchronization sequence.Contents1 Packet switching 2 Time-division multiplex 3 See also 4 ReferencesPacket switching[edit] In the OSI model
OSI model
of computer networking, a frame is the protocol data unit at the data link layer
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Collision (telecommunications)
A collision is the situation that occurs when two or more demands are made simultaneously on equipment that can handle only one at any given instant.[1] It may refer to:Collision domain, a physical network segment where data packets can "collide"Carrier-sense multiple access with collision avoidance, (CSMA/CA) used for example with wireless LANs Carrier-sense multiple access with collision detection, (CSMA/CD) used with EthernetLate collision, a specific type of collision that shouldn't occur on properly operating networks Local collision is a collision that occurs in the network interface rather than on the network itselfSee also[edit]Collision avoidance (networking) Collision (other)References[edit]^ Source: from
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Interpacket Gap
In computer networking, a minimal pause may be required between network packets or network frames. Depending on the physical layer protocol or encoding used, the pause may be necessary to allow for receiver clock recovery, permitting the receiver to prepare for another packet (e.g. powering up from a low-power state) or another purpose. Ethernet[edit] Ethernet
Ethernet
devices must allow a minimum idle period between transmission of Ethernet
Ethernet
packets known as the interpacket gap (IPG), interframe spacing, or interframe gap (IFG).[1] A brief recovery time between packets allows devices to prepare for reception of the next packet. While some physical layer variants literally transmit nothing during the idle period, most modern ones transmit a constant signal and send an idle pattern
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Time Division Multiple Access
Time-division multiple access
Time-division multiple access
(TDMA) is a channel access method for shared-medium networks. It allows several users to share the same frequency channel by dividing the signal into different time slots.[1] The users transmit in rapid succession, one after the other, each using its own time slot. This allows multiple stations to share the same transmission medium (e.g. radio frequency channel) while using only a part of its channel capacity. TDMA is used in the digital 2G cellular systems such as Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM), IS-136, Personal Digital Cellular (PDC) and iDEN, and in the Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications
Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications
(DECT) standard for portable phones. It is also used extensively in satellite systems, combat-net radio systems, and PON networks for upstream traffic from premises to the operator
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802.11
IEEE
IEEE
802.11
802.11
is a set of media access control (MAC) and physical layer (PHY) specifications for implementing wireless local area network (WLAN) computer communication in the 900 MHz and 2.4, 3.6, 5, and 60 GHz frequency bands. They are the world's most widely used wireless computer networking standards, used in most home and office networks to allow laptops, printers, and smartphones to talk to each other and access the Internet
Internet
without connecting wires. They are created and maintained by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) LAN/MAN Standards Committee ( IEEE
IEEE
802). The base version of the standard was released in 1997, and has had subsequent amendments. The standard and amendments provide the basis for wireless network products using the Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
brand
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802.11n
IEEE
IEEE
802.11n-2009, commonly shortened to 802.11n, is a wireless-networking standard that uses multiple antennas to increase data rates. Sometimes referred to as MIMO, which stands for "multiple input and multiple output", it is an amendment to the IEEE
IEEE
802.11-2007 wireless-networking standard. Its purpose is to improve network throughput over the two previous standards— 802.11a and 802.11g—with a significant increase in the maximum net data rate from 54 Mbit/s to 600 Mbit/s (slightly higher gross bit rate including for example error-correction codes, and slightly lower maximum throughput) with the use of four spatial streams at a channel width of 40 MHz.[1][2] 802.11n standardized support for multiple-input multiple-output, frame aggregation, and security improvements, among other features
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DVB-T
DVB-T
DVB-T
is an abbreviation for " Digital Video Broadcasting
Digital Video Broadcasting
— Terrestrial"; it is the DVB European-based consortium standard for the broadcast transmission of digital terrestrial television that was first published in 1997[1] and first broadcast in the UK in 1998.[1] This system transmits compressed digital audio, digital video and other data in an MPEG transport stream, using coded orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing ( COFDM
COFDM
or OFDM) modulation
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Guard Interval
In telecommunications, guard intervals are used to ensure that distinct transmissions do not interfere with one another, or otherwise cause overlapping transmissions
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Orthogonal Frequency-division Multiplexing
In telecommunications, Orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) is a method of encoding digital data on multiple carrier frequencies. OFDM has developed into a popular scheme for wideband digital communication, used in applications such as digital television and audio broadcasting, DSL internet access, wireless networks, power line networks, and 4G mobile communications. In COFDM coded orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing forward error correction (convolutional coding) and time/frequency interleaving are applied to the signal being transmitted. This is done to overcome errors in mobile communication channels affected by multipath propagation and Doppler effects. COFDM was introduced by Alard in 1986 [1] [2][3] for Digital Audio Broadcasting
Digital Audio Broadcasting
for Eureka Project 147
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OFDM
In telecommunications, Orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) is a method of encoding digital data on multiple carrier frequencies. OFDM has developed into a popular scheme for wideband digital communication, used in applications such as digital television and audio broadcasting, DSL internet access, wireless networks, power line networks, and 4G mobile communications. In COFDM coded orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing forward error correction (convolutional coding) and time/frequency interleaving are applied to the signal being transmitted. This is done to overcome errors in mobile communication channels affected by multipath propagation and Doppler effects. COFDM was introduced by Alard in 1986 [1] [2][3] for Digital Audio Broadcasting
Digital Audio Broadcasting
for Eureka Project 147
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