HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Grolsch
Grolsch Brewery
Brewery
(Koninklijke Grolsch N.V. - "Royal Grolsch"), known simply as Grolsch (Dutch pronunciation: [ɣrɔls]), is a Dutch brewery founded in 1615 by Willem Neerfeldt in Groenlo. In 1895 the de Groen family bought the brewery. They had started their own brewery in Cuijk the Netherlands in the early 19th century. It held a significant stake until November 2007. The main brewery is located today in Enschede. It was awarded the Koninklijk
Koninklijk
(Royal) title in 1995
[...More...]

"Grolsch" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Alcoholic Beverage
An alcoholic drink, or alcoholic beverage, is a drink that contains alcohol (ethanol), a depressant which in low doses causes euphoria, reduced anxiety, and sociability and in higher doses causes drunkenness, stupor and unconsciousness. Long-term use can lead to alcohol abuse, physical dependence, and alcoholism. Drinking alcohol plays an important social role in many cultures. Most countries have laws regulating the production, sale, and consumption of alcoholic beverages.[1] Some countries ban such activities entirely, but alcoholic drinks are legal in most parts of the world. The global alcoholic drink industry exceeded $1 trillion in 2014.[2] Alcohol
Alcohol
is one of the most widely used recreational drugs in the world
[...More...]

"Alcoholic Beverage" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Delisting (stock)
In corporate finance, a listing refers to the company's shares being on the list (or board) of stock that are officially traded on a stock exchange. Some stock exchanges allow shares of a foreign company to be listed and may allow dual listing, subject to conditions. Normally the issuing company is the one that applies for a listing but in some countries[which?] an exchange can list a company, for instance because its stock is already being traded via informal channels. Stocks whose market value and/or turnover fall below critical levels may be delisted by the exchange. Delisting often arises from a merger or takeover, or the company going private.Contents1 Listing requirements1.1 Examples of listing requirements2 Delisting 3 References 4 External linksListing requirements[edit] Each stock exchange has its own listing requirements or rules
[...More...]

"Delisting (stock)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Low-alcohol Beer
Low-alcohol beer
Low-alcohol beer
(also called light beer, non-alcoholic beer, small beer, small ale, or near-beer) is beer with little or no alcohol content, which aims to reproduce the taste of beer without the inebriating effects of standard alcoholic brews. Most low-alcohol beers are lagers, but there are some low-alcohol ales. In the United States, beverages containing less than 0.5% alcohol by volume (ABV) were legally called non-alcoholic, according to the now-defunct Volstead Act
[...More...]

"Low-alcohol Beer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pale Lager
Pale lager
Pale lager
is a very pale-to-golden-colored lager beer with a well attenuated body and a varying degree of noble hop bitterness. The brewing process for this beer developed in the mid-19th century, when Gabriel Sedlmayr took pale ale brewing techniques back to the Spaten Brewery
Spaten Brewery
in Germany
Germany
and applied them to existing lagering methods. This approach was picked up by other brewers, most notably Josef Groll
Josef Groll
of Bavaria
Bavaria
who produced Pilsner Urquell
Pilsner Urquell
in the city of Pilsen in the Austro-Hungarian Empire
Austro-Hungarian Empire
(now in the Czech Republic)
[...More...]

"Pale Lager" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rebate (marketing)
A rebate is an amount paid by way of reduction, return, or refund on what has already been paid or contributed. It is a type of sales promotion that marketers use primarily as incentives or supplements to product sales. The mail-in rebate (MIR) is the most common. A MIR entitles the buyer to mail in a coupon, receipt, and barcode in order to receive a check for a particular amount, depending on the particular product, time, and often place of purchase. Rebates are offered by either the retailer or the manufacturer of the chosen product. Large stores often work in conjunction with manufacturers, usually requiring two or even three separate rebates for each item. Manufacturer rebates are sometimes valid only at a single store. Rebate forms and special receipts are sometimes printed by the cash register at time of purchase on a separate receipt or available online for download. In some cases, the rebate may be available immediately, in which case it is referred to as an instant rebate
[...More...]

"Rebate (marketing)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Store Brand
Store brands or shop brands are a line of products strategically branded by a retailer within a single brand identity. They bear a similarity to the concept of house brands, private label brands (PLBs) in the United States, own brands in the UK, and home brands in Australia
Australia
and generic brands. They are distinct in that a store/shop brand is managed solely by the retailer for sale in only a specific chain of stores/shops. The retailer will design the manufacturing, packaging and marketing of the goods in order to build on the relationship between the products and the store's customer base. Store-brand goods are generally cheaper than national-brand goods, because the retailer can optimize the production to suit consumer demand and reduce advertising costs. Goods sold under a store brand are subject to the same regulatory oversight as goods sold under a national brand
[...More...]

"Store Brand" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Neelie Kroes
Neelie Kroes
Neelie Kroes
(Dutch pronunciation: [ˈneːli ˈkrus]; born 19 July 1941) is a retired Dutch politician of the People's Party for Freedom and Democracy (VVD).[1] Kroes, a corporate director by occupation, was elected as a Member of the House of Representatives on 3 August 1971 after the Dutch general election of 1971. After the Dutch general election of 1977 a coalition agreement with the Christian Democratic Appeal
Christian Democratic Appeal
(CDA) and the People's Party for Freedom and Democracy resulted in the formation of the Cabinet Van Agt-Wiegel with Kroes becoming Undersecretary for Transport, Public Works and Water Management taking office on 28 December 1977. After the Dutch general election of 1981 she returned as a Member of the House of Representatives on 25 August 1981
[...More...]

"Neelie Kroes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Interbrew
Interbrew was a large Belgium-based brewing company which owned many internationally known beers, as well as some smaller local beers. In 2004, Interbrew merged with Brazilian brewer AmBev
AmBev
to form InBev, which at the time became the largest brewer in the world by volume, with a 13% global market share. In 2008, InBev further merged with American brewer Anheuser-Busch
Anheuser-Busch
to form Anheuser-Busch
Anheuser-Busch
InBev (abbreviated AB InBev). Interbrew is now a division of Anheuser-Busch InBev SA/NV since the latter acquired SABMiller
SABMiller
in October 2016.[1] The Interbrew International B.V. subsidiary of Anheuser-Busch
Anheuser-Busch
InBev SA/NV is based in Breda, Netherlands.[2] It has one subsidiary, Ambev S.A
[...More...]

"Interbrew" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cartel
A 'cartel' is a group of apparently independent producers whose goal is to increase their collective profits by means of price fixing, limiting supply, or other restrictive practices. Cartels typically control selling prices, but some are organized to control the prices of purchased inputs. Antitrust laws attempt to deter or forbid cartels. A single entity that holds a monopoly by this definition cannot be a cartel, though it may be guilty of abusing said monopoly in other ways. Cartels usually occur in oligopolies, where there are a small number of sellers and usually involve homogeneous products
[...More...]

"Cartel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Strong Lager
Pale lager is a very pale-to-golden-colored lager beer with a well attenuated body and a varying degree of noble hop bitterness. The brewing process for this beer developed in the mid-19th century, when Gabriel Sedlmayr took pale ale brewing techniques back to the Spaten Brewery in Germany and applied them to existing lagering methods. This approach was picked up by other brewers, most notably Josef Groll of Bavaria who produced Pilsner Urquell in the city of Pilsen in the Austro-Hungarian Empire (now in the Czech Republic)
[...More...]

"Strong Lager" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

European Commission
The European Commission
European Commission
(EC) is an institution of the European Union, responsible for proposing legislation, implementing decisions, upholding the EU treaties and managing the day-to-day business of the EU.[2] Commissioners swear an oath at the European Court of Justice
Europ

[...More...]

"European Commission" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Porcelain
Porcelain
Porcelain
/ˈpɔːrsəlɪn, ˈpɔːrslɪn/ is a ceramic material made by heating materials, generally including kaolin, in a kiln to temperatures between 1,200 and 1,400 °C (2,200 and 2,600 °F). The toughness, strength, and translucence of porcelain, relative to other types of pottery, arises mainly from vitrification and the formation of the mineral mullite within the body at these high temperatures. Porcelain
Porcelain
slowly evolved in China and was finally achieved (depending on the definition used) at some point about 2,000 to 1,200 years ago, then slowly spread to other East Asian countries, and finally Europe and the rest of the world. Its manufacturing process is more demanding than that for earthenware and stoneware, the two other main types of pottery, and it has usually been regarded as the most prestigious type of pottery for its delicacy, strength, and its white colour
[...More...]

"Porcelain" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Reinheitsgebot
The Reinheitsgebot
Reinheitsgebot
(German pronunciation: [ˈʁaɪnhaɪtsɡəboːt] ( listen), literally "purity order"), sometimes called the "German Beer
Beer
Purity Law" in English, is the collective name for a series of regulations limiting the ingredients in beer in Germany and the states of the former Holy Roman Empire
[...More...]

"Reinheitsgebot" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hefeweizen
Wheat
Wheat
beer is a beer, usually top-fermented, which is brewed with a large proportion of wheat relative to the amount of malted barley. The two main varieties are Weissbier and Witbier; minor types include Lambic, Berliner Weisse
Berliner Weisse
and Gose.Contents1 Varieties1.1 Weizenbier 1.2 Witbier 1.3 Other varieties2 Names and types 3 Serving 4 Sensory profile 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksVarieties[edit] Two common varieties of wheat beer are Weißbier (German – "white beer") based on the German tradition of mixing at least 50% wheat to barley malt to make a light coloured top-fermenting beer, and witbier (Dutch – "white beer") based on the Belgian tradition of using flavorings such as coriander and orange peel
[...More...]

"Hefeweizen" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lager
Lager
Lager
is a type of beer conditioned at low temperatures.[1] It may be pale, golden, amber, or dark. Pale lager
Pale lager
is the most widely consumed and commercially available style of beer. Well-known brands include Pilsner
Pilsner
Urquell, Miller, Stella Artois, Beck's, Brahma, Budweiser Budvar, Corona, Snow, Tsingtao, Singha, Kirin, Heineken, Carling, Foster's, and Carlsberg. As well as maturation in cold storage, lager is also distinguished by the use of the Saccharomyces pastorianus yeast. While it is possible to use lager yeast in a warm fermentation process, such as with American steam beer, the lack of a cold storage maturation phase precludes such beer from being classified as lager
[...More...]

"Lager" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.