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Grimbald
Saint Grimbald (or Grimwald) (820 – 8 July 901) was a 9th-century Benedictine monk at the Abbey of Saint Bertin
Abbey of Saint Bertin
near Saint-Omer, France.[1] Although of dubious historical accuracy, the life of Grimbald was recorded in a several volumes, of which the main source is referred to as the Vita Prima of St
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Order Of Saint Benedict
The Order of Saint Benedict
Order of Saint Benedict
(OSB; Latin: Ordo Sancti Benedicti), also known – in reference to the colour of its members' habits – as the Black Monks, is a Catholic religious order
Catholic religious order
of independent monastic communities that observe the Rule of Saint Benedict. Each community (monastery, priory or abbey) within the order maintains its own autonomy, while the order itself represents their mutual interests
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Dictionary Of National Biography
The Dictionary of National Biography
Biography
(DNB) is a standard work of reference on notable figures from British history, published from 1885. The updated Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
Biography
(ODNB) was published on 23 September 2004 in 60 volumes and online, with 50,113 biographical articles covering 54,922 lives.Contents1 First series 2 Supplements and revisions 3 Concise dictionary 4 Oxford Dictionary of National Biography 5 First series contents 6 See also 7 Notes 8 External linksFirst series[edit] Hoping to emulate national biographical collections published elsewhere in Europe, such as the Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie (1875), in 1882 the publisher George Smith (1824–1901), of Smith, Elder & Co., planned a universal dictionary that would include biographical entries on individuals from world history. He approached Leslie Stephen, then editor of the Cornhill Magazine, owned by Smith, to become the editor
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Herefrith Of Thorney
Louth (/laʊθ/ ( listen) LOWTH) is a market town and civil parish in the East Lindsey
East Lindsey
district of Lincolnshire, England.[2] Louth is the principal town and centre for a large rural area of eastern Lincolnshire. Visitor attractions include St
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Edmund The Martyr
Edmund the Martyr
Edmund the Martyr
(also known as St Edmund or Edmund of East Anglia, died 20 November 869)[note 1] was king of East Anglia from about 855 until his death. Almost nothing is known about Edmund. He is thought to have been of East Anglian origin and was first mentioned in an annal of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, written some years after his death. The kingdom of East Anglia was devastated by the Vikings, who destroyed any contemporary evidence of his reign. Later writers produced fictitious accounts of his life, asserting that he was born in 841, the son of Æthelweard, an obscure East Anglian king, whom it was said Edmund succeeded when he was fourteen (or alternatively that he was the youngest son of a Germanic king named Alcmund). Later versions of Edmund's life relate that he was crowned on 25 December 855 at Burna (probably Bures St. Mary
Bures St

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Adulf
Saint Adulf (also Adolph, Adolf, Athwulf, Æthelwulf or Æðelwulf) (died c. 680 AD) was an Anglo-Saxon saint.Contents1 Life 2 See also 3 References and notes 4 External linksLife[edit] The saint is said to have been the brother of Botolph, but virtually nothing is known about his life. The story, which originated with a monk of Thorney, Folcard's, account of Botolph's life, that Adulf was at one time bishop of Maastricht, is now generally thought to rest on a confusion of names and to have no substance
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Rumon
Tavistock Abbey, also known as the Abbey
Abbey
of Saint Mary and Saint Rumon, is a ruined Benedictine
Benedictine
abbey in Tavistock, Devon.[1] Nothing remains of the abbey except the refectory,
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Elfin Of Warrington
Warrington
Warrington
is a large town and unitary authority area in Cheshire, England, on the banks of the River Mersey, 20 miles (32 km) east of Liverpool, and 20 miles (32 km) west of Manchester. The population in 2016 was estimated at 208,800,[2] more than double that of 1968 when it became a New Town. Warrington
Warrington
is the largest town in the county of Cheshire. Warrington
Warrington
was founded by the Romans at an important crossing place on the River Mersey. A new settlement was established by the Saxons. By the Middle Ages, Warrington
Warrington
had emerged as a market town at the lowest bridging point of the river
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Abbey Of Saint Bertin
The Abbey
Abbey
of St. Bertin was a Benedictine monastic abbey in Saint-Omer, France, which now in ruins that are open to the public. It was initially dedicated to St. Peter but was rededicated to its second abbot, St. Bertin. The abbey is known for its Latin
Latin
cartulary (Chartularium Sithiense) whose first part is attributed to St Folquin. The abbey was founded on the banks of the Aa in the 7th century by Bishop Audomar
Audomar
of Thérouanne, who is now better known as St. Omer. He sent the monks Bertin, Momelin, and Ebertram from Sithiu (now St-Omer) to proselytize among the pagans in the region. The abbey soon became one of the most influential monasteries in northern Europe and ranked in importance with Elnon (now St-Amand Abbey) and St. Vaast. Its library included the codex of the Leiden Aratea, from which two copies were made
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Brannoc Of Braunton
Braunton
Braunton
is an English village, civil parish, ecclesiastical parish and former manor in North Devon. The village is situated 5 miles (8 km) west of Barnstaple. While not the largest village in England, it is amongst the most populous in Devon
Devon
with a population at the 2011 census of 7,353 people.[2] There are two electoral wards (East and West). Their joint population at the above census was 8,218.[3][4] Within the parish is the fertile, low-lying Braunton Great Field, which adjoins the undulating Braunton
Braunton
Burrows, the Core Area in North Devon
Devon
Biosphere Reserve, the largest psammosere (sand dune system) in England
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Barloc
Chester
Chester
Cathedral
Cathedral
is a Church of England
Church of England
cathedral and the mother church of the Diocese
Diocese
of Chester. It is located in the city of Chester, Cheshire, England. The cathedral (formerly the abbey church of a Benedictine
Benedictine
monastery, dedicated to Saint Werburgh) is dedicated to Christ and the Blessed Virgin Mary. Since 1541 it has been the seat of the Bishop
Bishop
of Chester. The cathedral is a Grade I listed building, and part of a heritage site that also includes the former monastic buildings to the north, which are also listed Grade I. The cathedral, typical of English cathedrals in having been modified many times, dates from between 1093 and the early 16th century, although the site itself may have been used for Christian worship since Roman times
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List Of Anglo-Saxon Saints
The Anglo- Saxons
Saxons
were a people who inhabited Great Britain
Great Britain
from the 5th century. They comprise people from Germanic tribes
Germanic tribes
who migrated to the island from continental Europe, their descendants, and indigenous British groups who adopted some aspects of Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
culture and language. Historically, the Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
period denotes the period in Britain between about 450 and 1066, after their initial settlement and up until the Norman conquest.[1] The early Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
period includes the creation of an English nation, with many of the aspects that survive today, including regional government of shires and hundreds. During this period, Christianity was established and there was a flowering of literature and language
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Prosopography Of Anglo-Saxon England
The Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England
Anglo-Saxon England
(PASE) is a database and associated website that aims to collate everything that was written in contemporary records about anyone who lived in Anglo-Saxon England, in a prosopography.[1]
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Huna Of Thorney
Huna of Thorney
Huna of Thorney
was a seventh century Saint[1] Priest
Priest
and Hermit.[2] His influence in the Northumbrian and Anglian courts make him an important figure in the Christianisation of Anglo-Saxon England. Thorney Abbey
Thorney Abbey
ChurchHuna was a Chaplain
Chaplain
for saint Æthelthryth[3] the daughter of Anna of East Anglia, Queen of Ecgfrith, king of the Northumbrians and the Abbess
Abbess
of Ely and he gave Æthelthryth
Æthelthryth
advice pertaining to salvation and talked to her about the teachings and deeds of the saints.[4] St Huna also conducted her funeral.[5] After her death, Huna left Ely to become a hermit on an island in the Cambridgeshire fens. His residence on the island was called Huneia[6] and later known as Honey Hill, or Honey Farm, which is located just outside the town of Chatteris
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Sidney Lee
Sir Sidney Lee
Sidney Lee
FBA (5 December 1859 – 3 March 1926) was an English biographer, writer and critic.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Lee was born Solomon Lazarus Lee in 1859 at 12 Keppel Street, Bloomsbury, London. He was educated at the City of London
London
School and at Balliol College, Oxford, where he graduated in modern history in 1882. In 1883, Lee became assistant-editor of the Dictionary of National Biography. In 1890 he became joint editor, and on the retirement of Sir Leslie Stephen
Leslie Stephen
in 1891, succeeded him as editor. Lee wrote over 800 articles in the Dictionary, mainly on Elizabethan authors or statesmen. His sister Elizabeth Lee also contributed. While still at Balliol, Lee had written two articles on Shakespearean questions, which were printed in The Gentleman's Magazine
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Winchester
Winchester
Winchester
is a city and the county town of Hampshire, England. The city lies at the heart of the wider City of Winchester, a local government district, and is located at the western end of the South Downs National Park, along the course of the River Itchen.[2] It is situated 61 miles (98 km) south-west of London
London
and 13.6 miles (21.9 km) from Southampton, its closest city. At the time of the 2011 Census, Winchester
Winchester
had a population of 45,184. The wider City of Winchester
Winchester
district which includes towns such as Alresford and Bishop's Waltham
Bishop's Waltham
has a population of 116,800. [3] Winchester
Winchester
developed from the Roman town of Venta Belgarum, which in turn developed from an Iron Age
Iron Age
oppidum
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