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Gregory S. Paul
Accurate dinosaur restorations Pioneering feathered theropods during " Dinosaur
Dinosaur
Renaissance" Technical/popular books and articles, criticism of religionScientific careerFields Paleontology, Paleoart, Sociology, TheologyInstitutions IndependentInfluences Charles R. Knight, William Scheele, Bill BerryInfluenced Artists during and after the " Dinosaur
Dinosaur
Renaissance"Gregory Scott Paul (born December 24, 1954) is an American freelance researcher, author and illustrator who works in paleontology, and more recently has examined sociology and theology
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Gregory Paul Of Brzeziny
Grzegorz Paweł z Brzezin (English: Gregory Paul of Brzeziny, Latin: Gregorius Paulus Brzezinensis) (1525–1591), was a Socinian (Unitarian) writer and theologian, one of the principal creators and propagators of radical wing of the Polish Brethren, and author of several of the first theological works in Polish, which helped to the development of literary Polish.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Views 3 Major works 4 ReferencesBiography[edit] Paweł was educated at the University of Königsberg, where he encountered the ideas of Lutheranism and Calvinism. Upon his return he became rector of the school at the Catholic Collegiate Church of St. Mary Magdalene in Poznań. But he later had to abandon the position due to profession of Calvinism. From about 1550 he began to openly promote the Reformation, and from 1552, celebrated Protestant worship for the inhabitants of Kraków. He was named pastor in Pełsznicy church, and in 1557 was elected pastor of the church in Kraków
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Scientific American
Scientific American
Scientific American
(informally abbreviated SciAm) is an American popular science magazine. Many famous scientists, including Albert Einstein, have contributed articles in the past 170 years. It is the oldest continuously published monthly magazine in the United States (though it only became monthly in 1921).Contents1 History 2 International editions 3 First issue 4 Editors 5 Special
Special
issues 6 Scientific American
Scientific American
50 award 7 Website 8 Columns 9 Television 10 Books 11 Scientific and political debate 12 Awards 13 Top 10 Science Stories of the Year 14 Controversy 15 See also 16 References 17 External linksHistory[edit] Scientific American
Scientific American
was founded by inventor and publisher Rufus M. Porter in 1845[2] as a four-page weekly newspaper. Throughout its early years, much emphasis was placed on reports of what was going on at the U.S
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Jurassic Park (novel)
Jurassic Park
Jurassic Park
is a 1990 science fiction novel written by Michael Crichton, divided into seven sections (iterations). A cautionary tale about genetic engineering, it presents the collapse of an amusement park showcasing genetically recreated dinosaurs to illustrate the mathematical concept of chaos theory and its real world implications. A sequel titled The Lost World, also written by Crichton, was published in 1995. In 1997, both novels were re-published as a single book titled Michael Crichton's Jurassic World, unrelated to the film of the same name.[2][3][4] In 1993, Steven Spielberg
Steven Spielberg
adapted the book into the blockbuster film Jurassic Park. The book's sequel, The Lost World, was also adapted by Spielberg into a film in 1997
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On The Wing (1986 Film)
On the Wing is a 1986 IMAX film featuring a half-sized robotic Quetzalcoatlus that demonstrates principles of animal flight. Produced by the National Air and Space Museum, it also traces the early history of manned flight.[1] The film is narrated by F. Murray Abraham. In one scene filmed in Florida in 1984, a reproduction Benoist airboat was flown, depicting the inaugural flight of the world's first scheduled airline, the St. Petersburg-Tampa Airboat Line, in 1914.[1] References[edit]^ a b Brown, Warren J. (1994). Florida's Aviation History (2nd ed.). Largo, Florida: Aero-Medical Consultants. p. 330. ISBN 0-912522-70-4. External links[edit]On the Wing on IMDbThis article about a scientific documentary film is a stub
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IMAX
IMAX
IMAX
is a 70 mm motion picture film format that displays images of greater size and resolution than conventional film systems. Graeme Ferguson, Roman Kroitor, Robert Kerr, and William C. Shaw developed the IMAX
IMAX
cinema projection standards in the late 1960s and early 1970s in Canada.[1] Unlike conventional projectors, the film runs horizontally (see diagram sprocket holes) so that the image width is greater than the width of the film. Since 2002, some feature films have been converted into IMAX
IMAX
format for displaying in IMAX
IMAX
theatres, and some have also been partially shot in IMAX. IMAX
IMAX
is the most widely used system for special-venue film presentations
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Quetzalcoatlus
Quetzalcoatlus
Quetzalcoatlus
northropi /kɛtsəlkoʊˈætləs/ is an azhdarchid pterosaur known from the Late Cretaceous of North America ( Maastrichtian
Maastrichtian
stage) and one of the largest known flying animals of all time. It is a member of the family Azhdarchidae, a family of advanced toothless pterosaurs with unusually long, stiffened necks. Its name comes from the Mesoamerican feathered serpent god, Quetzalcoatl.Contents1 Description1.1 Size 1.2 Skull2 Discovery and species 3 Classification 4 Paleobiology4.1 Feeding 4.2 Flight5 Cultural significance 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksDescription[edit] Size[edit] See also: Pterosaur
Pterosaur
sizeSize comparison of Q. northropi (green), Q
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Becklespinax Altispinax
Altispinax
Altispinax
(/ˌæltɪˈspaɪnæks/; "with high spines") is a genus of large predatory theropod dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous (Valanginian, 140 to 133 million years ago) Wadhurst Clay Formation
Wadhurst Clay Formation
of East Sussex, England.Contents1 History1.1 Other Species2 Description 3 ReferencesHistory[edit] Probably during the early 1850s, fossil collector Samuel Husbands Beckles discovered some nodules with dinosaur bones in a quarry near Battle, East Sussex. These he sent to palaeontologist Richard Owen, who reported them in 1856.[1] Owen had a lithography made by Joseph Dinkel of the main specimen, a series of three back vertebrae with very tall spines, whose image was also shown in an 1884 edition of an 1855 volume of his standard work on British fossil reptiles,[2] leading to the misunderstanding the fossils had been recovered close to 1884
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Thermoregulation
Thermoregulation
Thermoregulation
is the ability of an organism to keep its body temperature within certain boundaries, even when the surrounding temperature is very different. A thermoconforming organism, by contrast, simply adopts the surrounding temperature as its own body temperature, thus avoiding the need for internal thermoregulation. The internal thermoregulation process is one aspect of homeostasis: a state of dynamic stability in an organism's internal conditions, maintained far from thermal equilibrium with its environment (the study of such processes in zoology has been called physiological ecology). If the body is unable to maintain a normal temperature and it increases significantly above normal, a condition known as hyperthermia occurs
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Johns Hopkins University
Johns Hopkins
Johns Hopkins
University
University
is an American private research university in Baltimore, Maryland. Founded in 1876, the university was named for its first benefactor, the American entrepreneur, abolitionist, and philanthropist Johns Hopkins.[5] His $7 million bequest (~$150 million in 2017 dollars)—of which half financed the establishment of Johns Hopkins Hospital—was the largest philanthropic gift in the history of the United States
United States
at that time.[6] Daniel Coit Gilman, who was inaugurated as the institution's first president on February 22, 1876,[7] led the university to revolutionize higher education in the U.S
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Baltimore
Baltimore
Baltimore
(/ˈbɔːltɪmɔːr/, locally [ˈbɔɫmɔɻ]) is the largest city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Maryland, and the 30th-most populous city in the United States. Baltimore
Baltimore
was established by the Constitution of Maryland[9] and is an independent city that is not part of any county. With a population of 611,648 in 2017, Baltimore
Baltimore
is the largest independent city in the United States
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Natural History (magazine)
Natural History is a natural history magazine published in the United States. The stated mission of the magazine is to promote public understanding and appreciation of nature and science. History[edit] Founded in 1900 by the American Museum of Natural History, Natural History was first titled The American Museum Journal. In 2002, the magazine was purchased from the Museum by a new company, headed at the time by Charles Harris.[1] As of 2013 the magazine is published in North Carolina by Howard Richman.[2] There are 10 issues published annually. Since its founding, Natural History has chronicled the major expeditions and research findings by curators at the American Museum of Natural History and at other natural history museums and science centers. Stephen Jay Gould's column, "This View of Life," was a regular feature of the magazine from 1974 until he retired the column in 2001
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Discover (magazine)
Discover is an American general audience science magazine launched in October 1980 by Time Inc. It has been owned by Kalmbach Publishing since 2010.Contents1 History1.1 Founding 1.2 Competition and change2 Blog portal 3 TV series 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Founding[edit] Discover was created primarily through the efforts of Time magazine editor Leon Jaroff. He noticed that magazine sales jumped every time the cover featured a science topic. Jaroff interpreted this as a considerable public interest in science, and in 1971, he began agitating for the creation of a science-oriented magazine
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Smithsonian (magazine)
Smithsonian is the official journal published by the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
The first issue was published in 1970.[3]Contents1 History 2 Content 3 Smithsonian American Ingenuity Awards 4 Smithsonian.com Photo Contest 5 Contributors 6 Notes and references 7 External linksHistory[edit] The history of Smithsonian began when Edward K. Thompson, the retired editor of Life magazine, was asked by the then-Secretary of the Smithsonian, S. Dillon Ripley, to produce a magazine "about things in which the Smithsonian [Institution] is interested, might be interested or ought to be interested."[4] Thompson would later recall that his philosophy for the new magazine was that it "would stir curiosity in already receptive minds. It would deal with history as it is relevant to the present. It would present art, since true art is never dated, in the richest possible reproduction
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Time (magazine)
Time
Time
(styled TIME) is an American weekly news magazine and news website published in New York City. It was founded in 1923 and originally run by Henry Luce. A European edition ( Time
Time
Europe, formerly known as Time
Time
Atlantic) is published in London and also covers the Middle East, Africa and, since 2003, Latin America. An Asian edition ( Time
Time
Asia) is based in Hong Kong. The South Pacific edition, which covers Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific Islands, is based in Sydney
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NOVA (TV Series)
Nova (stylized NOVΛ) is an American popular science television series produced by WGBH Boston. It is broadcast on Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) in the U.S., and in more than 100 other countries.[1] The series has won many major television awards.[2] Nova often includes interviews with scientists doing research in the subject areas covered and occasionally includes footage of a particular discovery. Some episodes have focused on the history of science. Examples of topics covered include the following: Colditz Castle, Drake equation, elementary particles, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, Fermat's Last Theorem, global warming, moissanite, Project Jennifer, storm chasing, Unterseeboot 869, Vinland, and the Tarim mummies. The Nova programs have been praised for their good pacing, clear writing, and crisp editing
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