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Greenhills School
Greenhills School is an independent college preparatory school (grades 6-12) in Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States.Contents1 Awards and recognition 2 Athletics 3 Renovation 4 Notable alumni 5 References 6 External linksAwards and recognition[edit] Greenhills Upper School was recognized as one of six national Intel Schools of Distinction in 2007 for excellence as one of the nation's top schools for science. The program recognizes one school for math and one for science in each of three school ranges (elementary, middle and high school).[1] Athletics[edit] Greenhills School is a member of the Michigan
Michigan
High School Athletic Association (MHSAA) and offers the following sports:Boys: tennis, baseball, basketball, cross country, golf, lacrosse, soccer, and track and field Girls: tennis, basketball, cross country, field hockey, golf, soccer, softball, track and field, and volleyball Coed: equestrian and swimming
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Co-ed
Mixed-sex education, also known as mixed-gender education, co-education or coeducation (abbreviated to co-ed or coed), is a system of education where males and females are educated together. Whereas single-sex education was more common up to the 19th century, mixed-sex education has since become standard in many cultures, particularly in Western countries. Single-sex education, however, remains prevalent in many Muslim
Muslim
countries. The relative merits of both systems have been the subject of debate. The world's oldest co-educational day and boarding school is Dollar Academy, a junior and senior school for males and females from ages 5 to 18 in Scotland, United Kingdom. From its opening in 1818 the school admitted both boys and girls of the parish of Dollar and the surrounding area. The school continues in existence to the present day with around 1,250 pupils.[1] The first co-educational college to be founded was Oberlin Collegiate Institute in Oberlin, Ohio
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Football (soccer)
Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer,[a] is a team sport played between two teams of eleven players with a spherical ball. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport.[3][4][5][6] The game is played on a rectangular field with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal. Players are not allowed to touch the ball with outstretched hands or arms while it is in play, unless they are goalkeepers within their penalty area. Other players mainly use their feet to strike or pass the ball, but may also use any other part of their body except the hands and the arms. The team that scores the most goals by the end of the match wins. If the score is level at the end of the game, either a draw is declared or the game goes into extra time or a penalty shootout depending on the format of the competition
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The Record (Bergen County)
The Record (colloquially called The Bergen Record or The Record of Hackensack[2]) is a newspaper in North Jersey, United States. It primarily serves Bergen County, though it also covers Hudson, Essex and Passaic counties as well. It has the second largest circulation of New Jersey's daily newspapers, behind The Star-Ledger.[1] Its editor is Richard A. Green. The Record was under the ownership of the Borg family from 1930 on and the family went on to form North Jersey
North Jersey
Media Group, which eventually bought its competitor, the Herald News. Both papers are now owned by Gannett Company, which purchased the Borgs' media assets in July 2016.[3] For years, The Record had its primary offices in Hackensack with a bureau in Wayne
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Leadership In Energy And Environmental Design
Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design
Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design
(LEED) is one of the most popular green building certification programs used worldwide.[7] Developed by the non-profit U.S. Green Building Council
U.S

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Geothermal Heat Pump
A geothermal heat pump or ground source heat pump (GSHP) is a central heating and/or cooling system that transfers heat to or from the ground. It uses the earth as a heat source (in the winter) or a heat sink (in the summer). This design takes advantage of the moderate temperatures in the ground to boost efficiency and reduce the operational costs of heating and cooling systems, and may be combined with solar heating to form a geosolar system with even greater efficiency. They are also known by other names, including geoexchange, earth-coupled, earth energy systems. The engineering and scientific communities prefer the terms "geoexchange" or "ground source heat pumps" to avoid confusion with traditional geothermal power, which uses a high temperature heat source to generate electricity.[1] Ground source heat pumps harvest heat absorbed at the Earth's surface from solar energy
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Swimming (sport)
Swimming is an individual or team sport that requires the use of ones arms and legs to move the body through water. The sport takes place in pools or open water (e.g., in a sea or lake). Competitive swimming is one of the most popular Olympic sports,[1] with varied distance events in butterfly, backstroke, breaststroke, freestyle, and individual medley. In addition to these individual events, four swimmers can take part in either a freestyle or medley relay. Swimming each stroke requires a set of specific techniques, and in competition, there are distinct regulations concerning the acceptable form for each individual stroke.[2] There are also regulations on what types of swimsuits, caps, jewelry and injury tape that are allowed at competitions
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Equestrianism
Equestrianism
Equestrianism
(from Latin
Latin
equester, equestr-, equus, horseman, horse),[1] more often known as riding, horse riding (British English) or horseback riding (American English),[2] refers to the skill of riding, driving, steeplechasing or vaulting with horses
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Ann Arbor Township
Ann Arbor Township, officially the Charter Township of Ann Arbor, is a charter township of Washtenaw County in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Michigan. As of the 2010 census, the township population was 4,361.[3] The city of Ann Arbor is adjacent to the township on the south and west sides. Small islands of the township also lie within the boundaries of the city of Ann Arbor. Under a 1994 boundary agreement with the city of Ann Arbor, eventually all of these islands will be permitted to be annexed by the city.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics 4 Economy 5 Education 6 Gallery 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] The Township of Ann Arbour was organized in 1827 by the Legislative Council of the Michigan
Michigan
Territory and the Village of Ann Arbour, which later became the City of Ann Arbor, was organized in 1833
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Volleyball
Volleyball
Volleyball
is a team sport in which two teams of six players are separated by a net. Each team tries to score points by grounding a ball on the other team's court under organized rules.[1] It has been a part of the official program of the Summer Olympic Games
Olympic Games
since 1964. The complete rules are extensive, but simply, play proceeds as follows: a player on one of the teams begins a 'rally' by serving the ball (tossing or releasing it and then hitting it with a hand or arm), from behind the back boundary line of the court, over the net, and into the receiving team's court. The receiving team must not let the ball be grounded within their court. The team may touch the ball up to 3 times but individual players may not touch the ball twice consecutively
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Softball
Softball
Softball
is a variant of baseball played with a larger ball on a smaller field. It was invented in 1887 in Chicago, Illinois, United States as an indoor game. It was at various times called indoor baseball, mush ball, playground, softball, kitten ball, and because it was also played by women, ladies' baseball. The name softball was given to the game in 1926, because the ball used to be soft. A tournament held in 1933 at the Chicago
Chicago
World's Fair spurred interest in the game. The Amateur Softball Association
Amateur Softball Association
(ASA) of America (founded 1933) governs the game in the United States
United States
and sponsors annual sectional and World Series championships
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Field Hockey
Field hockey
Field hockey
is a team sport of the hockey family. The earliest origins of the game date back to the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
in England, Scotland, France and the Netherlands.[1] The game can be played on a grass field, turf field or synthetic field as well as an indoor board surface. Each team plays with eleven players, including the goalie. Players use sticks made out of wood, carbon fibre, fibre glass or a combination of carbon fibre and fibre glass in different quantities (with the higher carbon fibre stick being more expensive and less likely to break) to hit a round, hard, plastic ball. The length of the stick depends on the player's individual height.[2] Only one end of the stick is allowed to be used
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Track And Field
Track and field
Track and field
is a sport which includes athletic contests established on the skills of running, jumping, and throwing.[1] The name is derived from the sport's typical venue: a stadium with an oval running track enclosing a grass field where the throwing and jumping events take place. Track and field
Track and field
is categorized under the umbrella sport of athletics, which also includes road running, cross country running, and race walking. The foot racing events, which include sprints, middle- and long-distance events, race walking and hurdling, are won by the athlete with the fastest time. The jumping and throwing events are won by the athlete who achieves the greatest distance or height. Regular jumping events include long jump, triple jump, high jump and pole vault, while the most common throwing events are shot put, javelin, discus and hammer
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Lacrosse
Lacrosse
Lacrosse
is a team sport played with a lacrosse stick and a lacrosse ball. Players use the head of the lacrosse stick to carry, pass, catch, and shoot the ball into the goal. The sport has four versions that have different sticks, fields, rules and equipment: field lacrosse, women's lacrosse, box lacrosse and intercrosse. The men's games, field lacrosse (outdoor) and box lacrosse (indoor), are contact sports and all players wear protective gear: helmet, gloves, shoulder pads, and elbow pads. The women's game does not allow body contact but does allow stick to stick contact. The only protective gear required for women players is eyegear, while goalies wear helmets and protective pads
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Michigan
Michigan
Michigan
(/ˈmɪʃɪɡən/ ( listen)) is a state in the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
and Midwestern regions of the United States. The state's name, Michigan, originates from the ( Ojibwe
Ojibwe
word) mishigamaa, meaning "large water" or "large lake".[3][7] Michigan
Michigan
is the tenth most populous of the 50 United States, with the 11th most extensive total area, and the largest state by total area east of the Mississippi
Mississippi
River.[b] Michigan's capital is Lansing, and its largest city is Detroit. Michigan
Michigan
is the only state to consist of two peninsulas. The Lower Peninsula, to which the name Michigan
Michigan
was originally applied, is often noted to be shaped like a mitten
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Golf
Golf
Golf
is a club-and-ball sport in which players use various clubs to hit balls into a series of holes on a course in as few strokes as possible. Golf, unlike most ball games, cannot and does not utilize a standardized playing area, and coping with the varied terrains encountered on different courses is a key part of the game. The game at the highest level is played on a course with an arranged progression of 18 holes, though recreational courses can be smaller, usually 9 holes. Each hole on the course must contain a tee box to start from, and a putting green containing the actual hole or cup (4.25 inches in diameter)
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