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Greenback, Tennessee
Greenback is a city in Loudon County, Tennessee, United States. Its population was at 1,064, according to the 2010 census. It is included in the Knoxville Metropolitan Statistical Area.Contents1 History1.1 Early history 1.2 Founding and later history 1.3 2010-2012 Tornadoes2 Geography 3 Demographics 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Early history[edit] Located near modern-day Greenback, Morganton Ferry (initially called Wear's Ferry) was an important crossing of the Little Tennessee. It was established in the late 18th century, and had grown into a small community known as "Portville" by 1810.[5] The community was chartered as "Morganton" after local merchant Gideon Morgan in 1813. Around this time, the Tellico agent relocated to Fort Southwest Point
Fort Southwest Point
(now Kingston), and a road quickly developed between this fort and Maryville
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City
A city is a large human settlement.[4][5] Cities generally have extensive systems for housing, transportation, sanitation, utilities, land use, and communication. Their density facilitates interaction between people, government organizations and businesses, sometimes benefiting different parties in the process. Historically, city-dwellers have been a small proportion of humanity overall, but following two centuries of unprecedented and rapid urbanization, roughly half of the world population now lives in cities, which has had profound consequences for global sustainability.[6] Present-day cities usually form the core of larger metropolitan areas and urban areas—creating numerous commuters traveling towards city centers for employment, entertainment, and edification
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Atlanta, Knoxville And Northern Railroad
Nicknamed "The Hiwassee Route"[citation needed] for a scenic portion of the railroad along the Hiawassee River, the Atlanta, Knoxville and Northern Railway was chartered in 1896 as a successor to the Marietta and North Georgia Railway, which had entered receivership in 1891. It was part of a railroad system that ran from the community of Elizabeth near Marietta, Georgia, northward to Murphy in far western North Carolina, and to Delano just south of Etowah in southeast Tennessee. History[edit] Originally incorporated in 1854 as the Ellijay Railroad after the town of Ellijay, Georgia, it was renamed the Marietta, Canton & Ellijay Railroad, and finally the Marietta and North Georgia Railroad, finally beginning construction in 1874. Beginning at the Western & Atlantic Railroad in Elizabeth (now within Marietta city limits), it connected through Blackwells, Noonday, Woodstock, Lebanon/Toonigh, Holly Springs, and Canton, taking until 1879 to do so
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Underground Railroad
The Underground Railroad
Underground Railroad
was a network of secret routes and safe houses established in the United States
United States
during the early to mid-19th century, and used by African-American slaves to escape into free states a
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Abolitionism In The United States
Abolitionism
Abolitionism
in the United States was the movement before and during the American Civil War
American Civil War
to end slavery in the United States. In the Americas and western Europe, abolitionism was a movement to end the Atlantic slave trade
Atlantic slave trade
and set slaves free. In the 17th century, English Quakers
Quakers
and Evangelicals condemned slavery as un-Christian. At that time, most slaves were Africans, but thousands of Native Americans were also enslaved. In the 18th century, as many as six million Africans were transported to the Americas as slaves, at least a third of them on British ships to North America
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Chilhowee Mountain
Chilhowee Mountain
Chilhowee Mountain
is a low ridge in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Tennessee
Tennessee
at the outer edge of the Great Smoky Mountains
Great Smoky Mountains
that stretches between the Little Tennessee
Tennessee
River (specifically Chilhowee Dam) to the west and the Little Pigeon River watershed to the east. While not entirely within the Great Smoky Mountains
Great Smoky Mountains
National Park, the mountain's crest is traversed by the westernmost section of Foothills Parkway. While the mountain is 35 miles (56 km) long, it rarely reaches a width of more than 3 or 4 miles (6.4 km). Little River cuts a large gap in the middle of the mountain (near Walland), dividing it into eastern and western sections
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Indiana
Indiana
Indiana
/ɪndiˈænə/ ( listen) is a U.S. state
U.S. state
located in the midwestern and Great Lakes
Great Lakes
regions of North America. Indiana
Indiana
is the 38th largest by area and the 17th most populous of the 50 United States. Its capital and largest city is Indianapolis. Indiana
Indiana
was admitted to the United States
United States
as the 19th U.S. state
U.S. state
on December 11, 1816
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Thompson's Station, Tennessee
Thompson's Station is a town in Williamson County, Tennessee. The population was 4,726 at the 2016 Special Census, up significantly from 2,681 in 2013. Several locations in Thompson's Station listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places: the Jacob Critz House and the Thomas L. Critz House, Thompson's Station Bank, John Neely House, James P. Johnson House, Homestead Manor and James Giddens House.Thompson's Station CabooseContents1 History 2 Geography 3 Government 4 Demographics 5 Economy 6 Education 7 ReferencesHistory[edit] The first settlers arrived in what is now Thompson's Station in the late 18th century. The community was originally known as "White House," but changed its name to "Littlebury" in 1836.[1] After the arrival of the railroad in 1855, Dr
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Southern Railway (U.S.)
The Southern Railway (reporting mark SOU) (also known as Southern Railway Company and now known as the current incarnation of the Norfolk Southern Railway) is a name of a class 1 railroad that was based in the Southern United States. The railroad is the product of nearly 150 predecessor lines that were combined, reorganized and recombined beginning in the 1830s, formally becoming the Southern Railway in 1894.[1] At the end of 1971, the Southern operated 6,026 miles (9,698 km) of railroad, not including its Class I subsidiaries AGS (528 miles or 850 km) CofG (1729 miles) S&A (167 miles) CNOTP (415 miles) GS&F (454 miles) and twelve Class II subsidiaries
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Louisville And Nashville Railroad
The Louisville and Nashville Railroad
Railroad
(reporting mark LN), commonly called the L&N, was a Class I railroad
Class I railroad
that operated freight and passenger services in the southeast United States. Chartered by the Commonwealth of Kentucky
Kentucky
in 1850, the road grew into one of the great success stories of American business. Operating under one name continuously for 132 years, it survived civil war and economic depression and several waves of social and technological change. Under Milton H. Smith, president of the company for thirty years, the L&N grew from a road with less than three hundred miles (480 km) of track to a 6,000-mile (9,700 km) system serving thirteen states. As one of the premier Southern railroads, the L&N extended its reach far beyond its namesake cities, stretching to St. Louis, Memphis, Atlanta, and New Orleans
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Fort Southwest Point
Fort Southwest Point was a federal frontier outpost at what is now Kingston, Tennessee, in the southeastern United States. Constructed in 1797 and garrisoned by federal soldiers until 1811, the fort served as a major point of interaction between the Cherokee and the United States government as well as a way station for early migrants travelling between Knoxville and Nashville. Although there are no records and few contemporary descriptions pertaining to the fort's design and structure, archaeological excavations conducted in the 1970s and 1980s have determined the fort's layout
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Great Depression
The Great Depression
Great Depression
was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression
Great Depression
varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until the late-1930s.[1] It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century.[2] In the 21st century, the Great Depression
Great Depression
is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline.[3] The Great Depression
Great Depression
started in the United States
United States
after a major fall in stock prices that began around September 4, 1929, and became worldwide news with the stock market crash of October 29, 1929 (known as Black Tuesday). Between 1929 and 1932, worldwide gross domestic product (GDP) fell by an estimated 15%
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Tennessee Valley Authority
The Tennessee Valley
Tennessee Valley
Authority (TVA) is a federally owned corporation in the United States
United States
created by congressional charter on May 18, 1933, to provide navigation, flood control, electricity generation, fertilizer manufacturing, and economic development to the Tennessee Valley, a region particularly affected by the Great Depression. The enterprise was a result of the efforts of Senator George W. Norris
George W. Norris
of Nebraska. TVA was envisioned not only as a provider, but also as a regional economic development agency that would use federal experts and electricity to more quickly modernize the region's economy and society. TVA's service area covers most of Tennessee, portions of Alabama, Mississippi, and Kentucky, and small slices of Georgia, North Carolina, and Virginia. It was the first large regional planning agency of the federal government and remains the largest
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Tellico Dam
Tellico Dam is a dam built by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in Loudon County, Tennessee on the Little Tennessee River just above the main stem of the Tennessee River. It impounds the Tellico Reservoir. Construction of the Tellico Dam was controversial and marks a turning point in American attitudes toward dam construction. Until the 1960s and 1970s, few questioned the value of building a dam; indeed, dams were considered to represent progress and technological prowess. During the twentieth century, the United States built thousands of dams.[2] By the 1950s, most of the best potential dam sites in the United States had been utilized and it became increasingly difficult to justify new dams, but government agencies such as TVA, the Bureau of Reclamation, and the Army Corps of Engineers continued to construct new dams. In the 1970s, the era of dam-building ended. The Tellico Dam case illustrates the United States' changing attitudes toward dams and the environment
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