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Greek Talent
The talent (Latin: talentum, from Ancient Greek: τάλαντον, talanton 'scale, balance, sum') was one of several ancient units of mass, a commercial weight, as well as corresponding units of value equivalent to these masses of a precious metal
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Latin Language
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Epiphanius Of Salamis
Epiphanius of Salamis
Epiphanius of Salamis
(Greek: Ἐπιφάνιος; c. 310–320 – 403) was bishop of Salamis, Cyprus, at the end of the 4th century. He is considered a saint and a Church Father
Church Father
by both the Orthodox and Roman Catholic Churches. He gained a reputation as a strong defender of orthodoxy. He is best known for composing the Panarion, a very large compendium of the heresies up to his own time, full of quotations that are often the only surviving fragments of suppressed texts. According to Ernst Kitzinger, he "seems to have been the first cleric to have taken up the matter of Christian religious images as a major issue", and there has been much controversy over how many of the quotations attributed to him by the Byzantine Iconoclasts
Byzantine Iconoclasts
were actually by him
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Sumer
Sumer
Sumer
(/ˈsuːmər/)[note 1] is the earliest known civilization in the historical region of southern Mesopotamia, modern-day southern Iraq, during the Chalcolithic
Chalcolithic
and Early Bronze
Bronze
ages, and arguably the first civilization in the world with Ancient Egypt
Ancient Egypt
and the Indus Valley.[1] Living along the valleys of the Tigris
Tigris
and Euphrates, Sumerian farmers were able to grow an abundance of grain and other crops, the surplus of which enabled them to settle in one place. Proto-writing
Proto-writing
in the prehistory dates back to c. 3000 BC
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Hebrews
Hebrews
Hebrews
(Hebrew: עברים or עבריים, Tiberian ʿIḇrîm, ʿIḇriyyîm; Modern Hebrew
Modern Hebrew
ʿIvrim, ʿIvriyyim; ISO 259-3 ʕibrim, ʕibriyim) is a term appearing 34 times within 32 verses[1][2][3] of the Hebrew
Hebrew
Bible
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Shekel
Shekel
Shekel
(Akkadian: šiqlu or siqlu; Hebrew: שקל‎, pl. shekels or sheqalim) is any of several ancient units of weight or of currency. Since it was a coin that represented a claim on a weight of barley held in the city warehouse, the term "shekel" was likely used in both contexts: 1) As the name of the coin, and; 2) To describe the measure of barley. This[which?] shekel was about 180 grains (11 grams or .35 troy ounces).Contents1 Name 2 History2.1 Collection of the half-Shekel 2.2 Carthage 2.3 Tyre 2.4 Judaea3 Present3.1 Israel4 See also 5 References5.1 Citations 5.2 BibliographyName[edit] The Sumerian word, Shekel
Shekel
derives from “She” which meant wheat, and, “Kel” was a measurement similar to a bushel, hence this coin was a symbol of a value of one bushel of wheat
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Ratio
In mathematics, a ratio is a relationship between two numbers indicating how many times the first number contains the second.[1] For example, if a bowl of fruit contains eight oranges and six lemons, then the ratio of oranges to lemons is eight to six (that is, 8:6, which is equivalent to the ratio 4:3). Similarly, the ratio of lemons to oranges is 6:8 (or 3:4) and the ratio of oranges to the total amount of fruit is 8:14 (or 4:7). The numbers in a ratio may be quantities of any kind, such as quantities of persons, objects, lengths, weights, etc. A ratio may be either a whole number or a fraction. A ratio may be written as "a to b" or a:b, or it may be expressed as a quotient of "a and b".[2] When the two quantities are measured with the same unit, as is often the case, their ratio is a dimensionless number
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Ancient Roman Weights And Measures
The ancient Roman units of measurement were largely built on the Hellenic system, which in turn was built upon Egyptian and Mesopotamian influences.[citation needed] The Roman units were comparatively consistent and well documented.Contents1 Length 2 Area 3 Volume3.1 Liquid measure 3.2 Dry measure4 Weight 5 Time5.1 Years 5.2 Weeks 5.3 Hours6 Unicode 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksLength[edit] The basic unit of Roman linear measurement was the pes or Roman foot (plural: pedes). Investigation of its relation to the English foot goes back at least to 1647, when John Greaves
John Greaves
published his Discourse on the Romane foot
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New Testament
The New Testament
New Testament
(Greek: Ἡ Καινὴ Διαθήκη, Hē Kainḕ Diathḗkē; Latin: Novum Testamentum) is the second part of the Christian biblical canon, the first part being the Old Testament, based on the Hebrew Bible. The New Testament
New Testament
discusses the teachings and person of Jesus, as well as events in first-century Christianity. Christians
Christians
regard both the Old and New Testaments together as sacred scripture. The New Testament
New Testament
(in whole or in part) has frequently accompanied the spread of Christianity
Christianity
around the world. It reflects and serves as a source for Christian theology
Christian theology
and morality
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Jesus
Jesus[e] (c. 4 BC – c. AD 30 / 33), also referred to as Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth
Nazareth
and Jesus
Jesus
Christ,[f] was a first-century Jewish preacher and religious leader.[12] He is the central figure of Christianity
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Parable Of The Talents
The Parable of the Talents (also the Parable of the Minas) is one of the parables of Jesus, which appears in two of the synoptic, canonical gospels of the New Testament:Matthew 25:14-30 Luke 19:12-27Although the basic story in each of these parables is essentially the same, the differences between the parables as they appear in the Gospel of Matthew
Gospel of Matthew
and in the Gospel of Luke
Gospel of Luke
are sufficient to indicate that the parables are not derived from the same source.[1] In Matthew, the opening words link the parable to the preceding Parable of the Ten Virgins, which refers to the Kingdom of Heaven.[1] The version in Luke is also called the Parable of the Pounds. In both Matthew and Luke, a master puts his servants in charge of his goods while he is away on a trip. Upon his return, the master assesses the stewardship of his servants
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Gospel Of Luke
The Gospel
Gospel
According to Luke (Greek: Τὸ κατὰ Λουκᾶν εὐαγγέλιον, to kata Loukan evangelion), also called the Gospel
Gospel
of Luke, or simply Luke, is the third of the four canonical Gospels. It tells of the origins, birth, ministry, atonement, death, resurrection, and ascension of Jesus
Jesus
Christ.[1] Luke is the longest of the four gospels and the longest book in the New Testament
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Denarii
The denarius (/deː.ˈnaː.rɪ.ʊs/, pl. dēnāriī, /deː.ˈnaː.rɪ.iː/) was the standard Roman silver coin from its introduction in the Second Punic War
Second Punic War
c. 211 BC[1] to the reign of Gordian III
Gordian III
(AD 238-244), when it was gradually replaced by the Antoninianus. It continued to be minted in very small quantities, likely for ceremonial purposes, until and through the tetrarchy (293-313).[2]:87 The word dēnārius is derived from the Latin
Latin
dēnī "containing ten", as its value was originally of 10 assēs.[note 1] The word for "money" descends from it in Italian (denaro), Slovene (denar), Portuguese (dinheiro), and Spanish (dinero)
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Metretes
A metretes was an ancient Greek unit of liquid measurement, equivalent to 37.4 liters. See[edit]Ancient Greek units of measurementThis standards- or measurement-related article is a stub
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Denarius
The denarius (/deː.ˈnaː.rɪ.ʊs/, pl. dēnāriī, /deː.ˈnaː.rɪ.iː/) was the standard Roman silver coin from its introduction in the Second Punic War
Second Punic War
c. 211 BC[1] to the reign of Gordian III
Gordian III
(AD 238-244), when it was gradually replaced by the Antoninianus. It continued to be minted in very small quantities, likely for ceremonial purposes, until and through the tetrarchy (293-313).[2]:87 The word dēnārius is derived from the Latin
Latin
dēnī "containing ten", as its value was originally of 10 assēs.[note 1] The word for "money" descends from it in Italian (denaro), Slovene (denar), Portuguese (dinheiro), and Spanish (dinero)
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Bible
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t eThe Bible
Bible
(from Koine Greek
Koine Greek
τὰ βιβλία, tà biblía, "the books")[1] is a collection of sacred texts or scriptures that Jews
Jews
and Christians consider to be a product of divine inspiration and a record of the relationship between God and humans. Many different authors contributed to the Bible
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