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Great Lakes Megalopolis
 United States  CanadaStates  Illinois  Indiana  Iowa  Kansas  Kentucky  Michigan  Minnesota  Missouri  New York  Ohio  Pennsylvania  West Virginia  WisconsinProvinces Ontario  QuebecLargest city Toronto
Toronto
(2,731,571)Largest metropolitan area Chicago metropolitan area
Chicago metropolitan area
(9,472,676)Population 59,144,461The Great Lakes
Great Lakes
Megalopolis consists of the group of metropolitan areas in North America
North America
largely in the Great Lakes region
Great Lakes region
and along the Saint Lawrence Seaway
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Columbus, Ohio
Columbus (/kəˈlʌmbəs/ kə-LUM-bəs) is the state capital and the most populous city in Ohio. It is the 14th-most populous city in the United States,[17][18][19][20] with a population of 860,090 as of 2016 estimates.[13][21] This makes Columbus the 3rd-most populous state capital in the United States
United States
after Phoenix, Arizona
Phoenix, Arizona
and Austin, Texas, and the second-most populous city in the Midwestern United States, after Chicago.[13][22] It is the core city of the Columbus, Ohio, Metropolitan Statistical Area, which encompasses ten counties.[23] With a population of 2,078,725, it is Ohio's second-largest metropolitan area. Columbus is the county seat of Franklin County.[24] The municipality has also expanded and annexed portions of adjoining Delaware
Delaware
County, Pickaway County and Fairfield County
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Upstate New York
Upstate New York
Upstate New York
is the portion of the American state of New York lying north of the New York metropolitan area
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Geography
Geography
Geography
(from Greek γεωγραφία, geographia, literally "earth description"[1]) is a field of science devoted to the study of the lands, the features, the inhabitants, and the phenomena of Earth.[2] The first person to use the word "γεωγραφία" was Eratosthenes (276–194 BC).[3] Geography
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Metropolitan Area
A metropolitan area, sometimes referred to as a metro area or commuter belt, is a region consisting of a densely populated urban core and its less-populated surrounding territories, sharing industry, infrastructure, and housing.[1] A metro area usually comprises multiple jurisdictions and municipalities: neighborhoods, townships, boroughs, cities, towns, exurbs, suburbs, counties, districts, states, and even nations like the eurodistricts
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France
France
France
(French: [fʁɑ̃s]), officially the French Republic (French: République française [ʁepyblik fʁɑ̃sɛz]), is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France
France
in western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.[XIII] The metropolitan area of France
France
extends from the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the English Channel
English Channel
and the North Sea, and from the Rhine
Rhine
to the Atlantic Ocean. The overseas territories include French Guiana
French Guiana
in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans
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Rust Belt
The Rust Belt
Rust Belt
is a region of the United States, made up mostly of places in the Midwest and Great Lakes, though the term may be used to include any location where industry declined starting around 1980. Rust refers to the deindustrialization, or economic decline, population loss, and urban decay due to the shrinking of its once-powerful industrial sector. The term gained popularity in the U.S. in the 1980s.[1] The Rust Belt
Rust Belt
begins in western New York and traverses west through Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio, Indiana, and the Lower Peninsula of Michigan, ending in northern Illinois, eastern Iowa, and southeastern Wisconsin. New England was also hard hit by industrial decline during the same era
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List Of Sovereign States
This list of sovereign states provides an overview of sovereign states around the world, with information on their status and recognition of their sovereignty. Membership within the United Nations
United Nations
system divides the 206 listed states into three categories: 193 member states,[1] 2 observer states, and 11 other states. The sovereignty dispute column indicates states whose sovereignty is undisputed (191 states) and states whose sovereignty is disputed (15 states, out of which there are 5 member states, 1 observer state and 9 other states). Compiling a list such as this can be a difficult and controversial process, as there is no definition that is binding on all the members of the community of nations concerning the criteria for statehood. For more information on the criteria used to determine the contents of this list, please see the criteria for inclusion section below
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Midwestern United States
The Midwestern United States, also referred to as the American Midwest, Middle West, or simply the Midwest, is one of four geographic regions defined by the United States
United States
Census Bureau. It occupies the northern central part of the United States
United States
of America.[2] It was officially named the North Central region by the Census Bureau until 1984.[3] It is located between the Northeastern U.S.
Northeastern U.S.
and the Western U.S., with Canada
Canada
to its north and the Southern U.S.
Southern U.S.
to its south. The Census Bureau's definition consists of 12 states in the north central United States: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin
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Cleveland
Cleveland
Cleveland
(/ˈkliːvlənd/ KLEEV-lənd) is a city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Ohio, and the county seat of Cuyahoga County,[7] the state's second most-populous county.[8][9] Located along Lake Erie, the city proper has a population of 388,072, making Cleveland
Cleveland
the 51st largest city in the United States,[5] and the second-largest city in Ohio
Ohio
after Columbus.[10][11] Greater Cleveland
Greater Cleveland
ranked as the 32nd-largest metropolitan area in the United States, with 2,055,612 people in 2016.[12] The city anchors the Cleveland–Akron–Canton Combined Statistical Area, which had a population of 3,515,646 in 2010 and ranks 15th in the United States. The city is located on the southern shore of Lake Erie, approximately 60 miles (100 kilometers) west of the Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
state border
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Northeast Megalopolis
The Northeast megalopolis
Northeast megalopolis
(also Boston–Washington corridor or Bos-Wash corridor or BosNYWash megalopolis[2]), the most populous megalopolis in the Western Hemisphere
Western Hemisphere
with over 50 million residents, is the most heavily urbanized region of the United States. Located in the Northeastern United States
United States
on the Atlantic Ocean, it runs primarily northeast to southwest from the northern suburbs of Boston, Massachusetts, to the southern suburbs of Washington, D.C., in Northern Virginia.[3] It includes the major cities of Boston, New York City, Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington, D.C.,[4] along with their metropolitan areas and suburbs, as well as many smaller urban centers. On a map, the megalopolis appears almost as a straight line. As of the year 2010, the region contained over 50 million people, about 17% of the U.S
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Minneapolis–Saint Paul
Minnesota Wisconsin*Principal citiesMinneapolis Saint PaulArea • Urban 1,021.8 sq mi (2,646 km2) • Metro 8,120 sq mi (21,000 km2)Highest elevation 1,376 ft (419 m)Lowest elevation 666 ft (203 m)Population (2016) • Density 515.4/sq mi (199.0/km2) • Urban 3,112,117 (14th) • MSA 3,600,618 (16th) • CSA 3,946,533 (14th)  MSA/CSA: 2017 Urban: 2010Time zone CST (UTC-6) • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)MSA Historical PopulationCensus Pop.%±1850 4,491—1860 77,5651,627.1%1870 167,674116.2%1880 284,76669.8%1890 540,23289.7%1900 649,73520.3%1910 808,38824.4%1920 921,03113.9%1930 1,069,84516.2%1
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Detroit
Detroit
Detroit
(/dɪˈtrɔɪt/)[6] is the most populous city in the U.S. state of Michigan, the largest city on the United States–Canada border, and the seat of Wayne County. The municipality of Detroit
Detroit
had a 2016 estimated population of 672,795, making it the 23rd-most populous city in the United States. The metropolitan area, known as Metro Detroit, is home to 4.3 million people, making it the second-largest in the Midwest
Midwest
after Chicago. Detroit
Detroit
is a major port on the Detroit
Detroit
River, one of the four major straits that connect the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
system to the Saint Lawrence Seaway. The Detroit Metropolitan Airport
Detroit Metropolitan Airport
is among the most important hubs in the United States
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Rochester, New York
Rochester (/ˈrɒtʃɪstər, ˈrɒtʃɛstər/) is a city on the southern shore of Lake Ontario
Lake Ontario
in western New York. With a population of 208,880 residents, Rochester is the seat of Monroe County and the third most populous city in New York state, after New York City
New York City
and Buffalo. The metropolitan area has a population of just over 1 million people.[4] Rochester was one of America's first boomtowns, initially due to its flour mills along the Genesee River, and then as a manufacturing hub.[5] Several of the region's universities (notably the University of Rochester and Rochester Institute of Technology) have renowned research programs. Rochester is the site of many important inventions and innovations in consumer products. The Rochester area has been the birthplace to Kodak, Western Union, Bausch & Lomb, Gleason and Xerox, which conduct extensive research and manufacturing of industrial and consumer products
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Quebec City
Quebec
Quebec
City (pronounced /kwɪˈbɛk/ ( listen) or /kəˈbɛk/;[9] French: Québec [kebɛk] ( listen)); French: Ville de Québec), officially Québec,[10][11][11] is the capital city of the Canadian province of Quebec. The city had a population estimate of 531,902 in July 2016, (an increase of 3.0% from 2011)[12] and the metropolitan area had a population of 800,296 in July 2016, (an increase of 4.3% from 2011)[13] making it the second largest city in Quebec, after Montreal, and the seventh-largest metropolitan area in Canada. The narrowing of the Saint Lawrence River
Saint Lawrence River
proximate to the city's promontory, Cap-Diamant (Cape Diamond), and Lévis, on the opposite bank, provided the name given to the city, Kébec, an Algonquin word meaning "where the river narrows"
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Greater St. Louis
Greater St. Louis
St. Louis
is the metropolitan area that completely surrounds and includes the independent city of St. Louis
St. Louis
(its principal city). It includes parts of both the U.S. states of Missouri
Missouri
and Illinois. The city core is on the border with Illinois
Illinois
and collectively the two regions form the combined metropolitan area. St. Louis
St. Louis
is the largest metro area in Missouri, and is the second largest in Illinois. St. Louis County is independent of the city of St. Louis
St. Louis
and their two populations are generally tabulated separately. All but one of Missouri's 10 Fortune 500
Fortune 500
companies are based here. Depending on the counties included in the area, it can refer to the St. Louis, MO–IL metropolitan statistical area (MSA) or the St. Louis–St
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