HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Great Irish Famine
The Great Famine
Famine
(Irish: an Gorta Mór, [anˠ ˈgɔɾˠt̪ˠa mˠoːɾˠ]) or the Great Hunger was a period of mass starvation, disease, and emigration in Ireland
Ireland
between 1845 and 1849.[1] It is sometimes referred to, mostly outside Ireland, as the Irish Potato Famine, because about two-fifths of the population was solely reliant on this cheap crop for a number of historical reasons.[2][3] During the famine, about one million people died and a million more emigrated from Ireland,[4] causing the island's population to fall by between 20% and 25%.[5] The proximate cause of famine was potato blight,[6] which ravaged potato crops throughout Europe during the 1840s
[...More...]

"Great Irish Famine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Irish Famine (other)
Great Famine (Ireland)
Great Famine (Ireland)
(1845–49) is sometimes referred to as the Irish Potato Famine or an Gorta Mór. Irish famine may also refer to:Irish Famine (1740–41), known in Irish as Bliain an Áir, "Year of Slaughter" Irish Famine (1879), sometimes called the "mini-famine" or an Gorta Beag Irish Famine (1925), the last major Irish famineOther[edit]The Irish Famine (book), 2001 book by Diarmaid Ferriter and Colm Tóibín Irish potato famine (legacy)See also[edit]Great CalamityThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Irish famine. If an internal link led
[...More...]

"Irish Famine (other)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Irish Catholic
Irish Catholics
Irish Catholics
are an ethnoreligious group native to Ireland[1][2] that are both Catholic and Irish. Irish Catholics
Irish Catholics
have a large diaspora, which includes more than 36 million Americans.[3] Divisions between Irish Catholics
Irish Catholics
and Irish Protestants played a major role in the history of Ireland
Ireland
from the 16th to the 20th century, especially the Home Rule Crisis
Home Rule Crisis
and the Troubles. While religion broadly marks the delineation of these divisions, the contentions were primarily political and related to access to power
[...More...]

"Irish Catholic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Executive (government)
The executive is the organ exercising authority in and holding responsibility for the governance of a state. The executive executes and enforces law. In political systems based on the principle of separation of powers, authority is distributed among several branches (executive, legislative, judicial) — an attempt to prevent the concentration of power in the hands of a small group of people. In such a system, the executive does not pass laws (the role of the legislature) or interpret them (the role of the judiciary). Instead, the executive enforces the law as written by the legislature and interpreted by the judiciary. The executive can be the source of certain types of law, such as a decree or executive order. Executive bureaucracies are commonly the source of regulations. In the Westminster political system, the principle of separation of powers is not as entrenched
[...More...]

"Executive (government)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lord Lieutenant Of Ireland
Lord Lieutenant of Ireland
Lord Lieutenant of Ireland
(UK: /lɛfˈtɛnənt/; Irish: Tiarna Leifteanant na hÉireann[1]) was the title of the chief governor of Ireland from the Williamite Wars
Williamite Wars
of 1690 till the Partition of Ireland in 1922. This spanned the Kingdom of Ireland
Kingdom of Ireland
(1541–1800) and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland
(1801–1922). The office, under its various names, was often more generally known as the viceroy (Irish: an Leasrí[2]), and his wife was known as the vicereine. The government of Ireland in practice was usually in the hands of the Lord Deputy up to the 17th century, and later of the Chief Secretary for Ireland
[...More...]

"Lord Lieutenant Of Ireland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chief Secretary For Ireland
The Chief Secretary for Ireland
Chief Secretary for Ireland
was a key political office in the British administration in Ireland. Nominally subordinate to the Lord Lieutenant, and officially the "Chief Secretary to the Lord Lieutenant",[1] from the early 19th century until the end of British rule he was effectively the government minister with responsibility for governing Ireland; usually it was the Chief Secretary, rather than the Lord Lieutenant, who sat in the British Cabinet.[2] The Chief Secretary was ex officio President of the Local Government Board for Ireland from its creation in 1872.[3] British rule over much of Ireland came to an end as the result of the Irish War of Independence, which culminated in the establishment of the Irish Free State. In consequence the office of Chief Secretary was abolished, as well as that of Lord Lieutenant
[...More...]

"Chief Secretary For Ireland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

House Of Commons Of The United Kingdom
The House of Commons
House of Commons
is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Like the upper house, the House of Lords, it meets in the Palace of Westminster. Officially, the full name of the house is the Honourable the Commons of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
in Parliament assembled. Offices however extend to Portcullis House
Portcullis House
due to shortage of space. The Commons is an elected body consisting of 650 members known as Members of Parliament (MPs). Members are elected to represent constituencies by first-past-the-post and hold their seats until Parliament is dissolved. The House of Commons
House of Commons
of England
England
evolved in the 13th and 14th centuries
[...More...]

"House Of Commons Of The United Kingdom" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Peerage Of Ireland
The Peerage of Ireland consists of those titles of nobility created by the English monarchs in their capacity as Lord or King of Ireland, or later by monarchs of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.[1] The creation of such titles came to an end in the 19th century. The ranks of the Irish peerage are Duke, Marquess, Earl, Viscount
Viscount
and Baron. As of 2016, there were 135 titles in the Peerage of Ireland extant: two dukedoms, ten marquessates, 43 earldoms, 28 viscountcies, and 52 baronies
[...More...]

"Peerage Of Ireland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Representative Peer
In the United Kingdom, representative peers were those peers elected by the members of the Peerage of Scotland and the Peerage of Ireland to sit in the British House of Lords. Until 1999, all members of the Peerage of England held the right to sit in the House of Lords; they did not elect a limited group of representatives. All peers who were created after 1707 as Peers of Great Britain
Great Britain
and after 1801 as Peers of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
held the same right to sit in the House of Lords. Representative peers were introduced in 1707, when the Kingdom of England and the Kingdom of Scotland
Kingdom of Scotland
were united into the Kingdom of Great Britain
[...More...]

"Representative Peer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

House Of Lords
The House of Lords
House of Lords
of the United Kingdom, also known as the House of Peers, is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Like the House of Commons, it meets in the Palace of Westminster.[2] Officially, the full name of the house is the Right Honourable the Lords Spiritual
Lords Spiritual
and Temporal of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
in Parliament assembled. Unlike the elected House of Commons, all members of the House of Lords (excluding 90 hereditary peers elected among themselves and two peers who are ex officio members) are appointed.[3] The membership of the House of Lords
House of Lords
is drawn from the peerage and is made up of Lords Spiritual and Lords Temporal
[...More...]

"House Of Lords" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Benjamin Disraeli
Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield, KG, PC, FRS (21 December 1804 – 19 April 1881), was a British statesman of the Conservative Party who twice served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. He played a central role in the creation of the modern Conservative Party, defining its policies and its broad outreach. Disraeli is remembered for his influential voice in world affairs, his political battles with the Liberal Party leader William Ewart Gladstone, and his one-nation conservatism or " Tory
Tory
democracy". He made the Conservatives the party most identified with the glory and power of the British Empire. He is the only British prime minister to have been of Jewish birth. He was also a novelist, publishing works of fiction even as Prime Minister. Disraeli was born in Bloomsbury, then a part of Middlesex. His father left Judaism after a dispute at his synagogue; young Benjamin became an Anglican at the age of 12
[...More...]

"Benjamin Disraeli" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Church Of Ireland
The Church of Ireland
Church of Ireland
(Irish: Eaglais na hÉireann; Ulster-Scots: Kirk o Airlann[3]) is a Christian church
Christian church
in Ireland and an autonomous province of the Anglican
Anglican
Communion. It is organised on an all-Ireland basis and is the second-largest Christian church
Christian church
on the island after the Catholic Church. Like other Anglican
Anglican
churches, it has retained elements of pre-Reformation practice, notably its episcopal polity, while rejecting the primacy of the Bishop of Rome. In theological and liturgical matters, it incorporates many principles of the Reformation, particularly those espoused during the English Reformation
[...More...]

"Church Of Ireland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Penal Laws (Ireland)
In the island of Ireland, Penal Laws (Irish: Na Péindlíthe) were a series of laws imposed in an attempt to force Irish Roman Catholics and Protestant dissenters (such as local Presbyterians) to accept the reformed denomination as defined by the English state established Anglican Church
Anglican Church
and practised[1] by members of the Irish state established Church of Ireland.[2] All remaining penal laws were finally repealed by the
[...More...]

"Penal Laws (Ireland)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Skibbereen
Skibbereen
Skibbereen
(/ˌskɪ.bəˈriːn/; Irish: An Sciobairín), is a town in County Cork, Ireland. It is located on the N71 national secondary road. The name "Skibbereen" (sometimes shortened to "Skibb") means "little boat harbour". The River Ilen runs through the town; it reaches the sea about 12 kilometers away, at the seaside village of Baltimore
[...More...]

"Skibbereen" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Catholic Emancipation
Catholic emancipation
Catholic emancipation
or Catholic relief was a process in the Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland
Ireland
in the late 18th century and early 19th century that involved reducing and removing many of the restrictions on Roman Catholics introduced by the Act of Uniformity, the Test Acts and the penal laws. Requirements to abjure (renounce) the temporal and spiritual authority of the Pope
Pope
and transubstantiation placed major burdens on Roman Catholics. The penal laws started to be dismantled from 1766
[...More...]

"Catholic Emancipation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Roman Catholic Relief Act 1829
The Roman Catholic Relief Act 1829, passed by Parliament in 1829, was the culmination of the process of Catholic Emancipation
Catholic Emancipation
throughout the UK. In Ireland
Ireland
it repealed the Test Act
Test Act
1672 and the remaining Penal Laws which had been in force since the passing of the Disenfranchising Act of the Irish Parliament of 1728. Its passage followed a vigorous campaign that threatened insurrection led by Irish lawyer Daniel O'Connell. The British leaders, starting with the Prime Minister the Duke of Wellington
Duke of Wellington
and his top aide Robert Peel, although personally opposed, gave in to avoid civil strife. Ireland
Ireland
was quiet after the passage. The Act permitted members of the Catholic Church to sit in the parliament at Westminster. O'Connell had won a seat in a by-election for Clare in 1828 against an Anglican
[...More...]

"Roman Catholic Relief Act 1829" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.