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Great Fire Of New York
The 1835 Great Fire of New York
Great Fire of New York
was one of three fires that rendered extensive damage to New York City
New York City
in the 18th and 19th centuries. The fire occurred in the middle of an economic boom, covering 17 city blocks, killing two people, and destroying hundreds of buildings, with an estimated $20 million of property damage (equivalent to $508 million in 2017).[1][2]Contents1 Background 2 Fire 3 Damage 4 Reconstruction 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksBackground[edit] By 1835, New York City
New York City
was the premier American city, and its financial prowess surpassed that of Philadelphia
Philadelphia
or Boston
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Great Fire Of London
The Great Fire of London
Great Fire of London
was a major conflagration that swept through the central parts of the English city of London from Sunday, 2 September to Wednesday, 5 September 1666.[1] The fire gutted the medieval City of London
City of London
inside the old Roman city wall. It threatened but did not reach the aristocratic district of Westminster, Charles II's Palace of Whitehall, and most of the suburban slums.[2] It consumed 13,200 houses, 87 parish churches, St Paul's Cathedral, and most of the buildings of the City authorities. It is estimated to have destroyed the homes of 70,000 of the City's 80,000 inhabitants.[3] The death toll is unknown but traditionally thought to have been small, as only six verified deaths were recorded
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Wayback Machine
The Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
is a digital archive of the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
and other information on the Internet
Internet
created by the Internet
Internet
Archive, a nonprofit organization, based in San Francisco, California, United States.Contents1 History 2 Technical details2.1 Storage capabilities 2.2 Growth 2.3 Website exclusion policy2.3.1 Oakland Archive
Archive
Policy3 Uses3.1 In legal evidence3.1.1 Civil litigation3.1.1.1 Netbula LLC v. Chordiant Software Inc. 3.1.1.2 Telewizja Polska3.1.2 Patent law 3.1.3 Limitations of utility4 Legal status 5 Archived content legal issues5.1 Scientology 5.2 Healthcare Advocates, Inc. 5.3 Suzanne Shell 5.4 Daniel Davydiuk6 Censorship and other threats 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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Gross Domestic Product Deflator
In economics, the GDP
GDP
deflator (implicit price deflator) is a measure of the level of prices of all new, domestically produced, final goods and services in an economy. GDP
GDP
stands for gross domestic product, the total value of all final goods and services produced within that economy during a specified period. Like the consumer price index (CPI), the GDP
GDP
deflator is a measure of price inflation/deflation with respect to a specific base year; the GDP
GDP
deflator of the base year itself is equal to 100
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Great Fire Of Turku
The Great Fire of Turku
Turku
(Finnish: Turun palo and Swedish: Åbo brand) was a conflagration that is still the largest urban fire in the history of Finland
Finland
and the Nordic countries. The fires started burning on 4 September 1827 in burgher Carl Gustav Hellman’s house on the Aninkaistenmäki hill slightly before 9 p.m. The fire quickly swept through the northern quarter, spread to the southern quarter and jumped the Aura River, setting the Cathedral Quarter on fire before midnight. By the next day, the fire had destroyed 75% of the city. Only 25% of the city was spared, mainly the western and southern portions.Map of Åbo after the 1827 fire. Destroyed areas are in grey, surviving areas in red
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Great Chicago Fire
The Great Chicago
Chicago
Fire was a conflagration that burned from Sunday, October 8, to Tuesday, October 10, 1871. The fire killed up to 300 people, destroyed roughly 3.3 square miles (9 km2) of Chicago, Illinois, and left more than 100,000 residents homeless.[2]Contents1 Origin 2 Spread of the fire 3 Aftermath 4 Panorama of Chicago
Chicago
after the 1871 Fire 5 Rumors about the fire 6 Surviving structures 7 Related events 8 In popular culture 9 See also 10 References 11 Further reading 12 External linksOrigin[edit]1871 Chicago
Chicago
view before the 'Great Conflagration'The fire started at about 9:00 p.m
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Great Fire Of Brisbane
The Great fire of Brisbane was a major conflagration that swept through the central parts of Brisbane in the Colony of Queensland (now a state of Australia) on 1 December 1864. For two and a half hours the fire burned out of control in large parts of Brisbane's central business district with entire blocks being destroyed, mainly in Queen, Albert, George, and Elizabeth Streets
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Hartford, Connecticut
Hartford is the capital of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Connecticut. It was the seat of Hartford County until Connecticut
Connecticut
disbanded county government in 1960. The city is nicknamed the " Insurance
Insurance
Capital of the World", as it hosts many insurance company headquarters which is the region's major industry. Hartford was founded in 1635 and is among the oldest cities in the United States
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Croton Aqueduct
The Croton Aqueduct
Croton Aqueduct
or Old Croton Aqueduct
Croton Aqueduct
was a large and complex water distribution system constructed for New York City
New York City
between 1837 and 1842. The great aqueducts, which were among the first in the United States, carried water by gravity 41 miles (66 km) from the Croton River
Croton River
in Westchester County
Westchester County
to reservoirs in Manhattan. It was built because local water resources had become polluted and inadequate for the growing population of the city
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Pearl Street (Manhattan)
Pearl Street is a street in the Financial District in Lower Manhattan, running northeast from Battery Park
Battery Park
to the Brooklyn Bridge
Brooklyn Bridge
with an interruption at Fulton Street, where Pearl Street's alignment west of Fulton Street shifts one block south of its alignment east of Fulton Street, then turning west and terminating at Centre Street.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The history of Pearl Street dates back to the early 1600s, when the Dutch first settled on the southern tip of Manhattan. Its name is an English translation of the Dutch Parelstraat (written as Paerlstraet around 1660). This street, visible on the Castello Plan
Castello Plan
along the eastern shore of New Amsterdam, was named for the many oysters found in the river. During the period of British rule, Pearl Street was known as Great Queen Street
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William Street (Manhattan)
Coordinates: 40°42′29.47″N 74°0′28.28″W / 40.7081861°N 74.0078556°W / 40.7081861; -74.0078556William Street, looking south from below Cedar StreetWilliam Street is a street in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan, New York City. It runs generally southwest to northeast, crossing Wall Street
Wall Street
and terminating at Broad Street and Spruce Street, respectively. Between Beaver Street and Broad Street, the street is known as South William Street. Between Beekman Street and Spruce Street, in front of New York Downtown Hospital, William Street is pedestrian-only.Contents1 History 2 Buildings 3 Transportation 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit]View of the northeast corner of William and Wall streets. The house to the far right became City Bank of New York's first home at 38 Wall Street, later re-numbered as №52. (Painting by Archibald Robertson, c
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Maiden Lane (Manhattan)
Coordinates: 40°42′26.75″N 74°0′27.63″W / 40.7074306°N 74.0076750°W / 40.7074306; -74.0076750Looking up Broadway from the corner of Maiden Lane (at right) c. 1885-87The street level of 33 Maiden Lane, designed by Philip Johnson
Philip Johnson
and John Burgee
John Burgee
and built in 1984-8690-94 Maiden Lane, one of the few mid-19th century commercial buildings still standing in Lower ManhattanMaiden Lane is an east-west street in the Financial District of the New York City
New York City
borough of Manhattan
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City Block
A city block, urban block or simply block is a central element of urban planning and urban design. A city block is the smallest area that is surrounded by streets. City blocks are the space for buildings within the street pattern of a city, and form the basic unit of a city's urban fabric. City blocks may be subdivided into any number of smaller land lots usually in private ownership, though in some cases, it may be other forms of tenure. City blocks are usually built-up to varying degrees and thus form the physical containers or 'streetwalls' of public space. Most cities are composed of a greater or lesser variety of sizes and shapes of urban block
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Brooklyn Navy Yard
The Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Navy Yard was a shipyard located in Brooklyn, New York, 1.7 mi (2.7 km) east of the Battery on the East River
East River
in Wallabout Basin, a semicircular bend of the river across from Corlears Hook in Manhattan. It was bounded by Navy Street and Flushing and Kent Avenues, and at the height of its production of warships for the United States Navy, it covered over 200 acres (0.81 km2)
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Coenties Slip
Coordinates: 40°42′13″N 74°00′38″W / 40.70366°N 74.01063°W / 40.70366; -74.01063 Coenties Slip
Coenties Slip
in 1893Coenties Slip, originally an artificial inlet in the East River
East River
for the loading and unloading of ships that was land-filled in 1835, is a historic street in Lower Manhattan, New York City, in the heart of the Financial District. It runs southeast from Pearl Street to South Street, a distance of two blocks (585.6 feet). The one block portion between Pearl Street and Water Street carries vehicular traffic, while the remaining section is a pedestrian street.Contents1 History 2 Coenties Alley 3 Artists of Coenties Slip 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Although surrounded by skyscrapers, a row of buildings from the 19th century still stands along the block that is open to vehicles, and these buildings are in active use by small businesses
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