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Great Ejection
The Great Ejection
Great Ejection
followed the Act of Uniformity 1662
Act of Uniformity 1662
in England. Several thousand Puritan
Puritan
ministers were forced out of their positions by Church of England
England
clergy, following the changes after the restoration to power of Charles II. It was a consequence (not necessarily intended) of the Savoy Conference
Savoy Conference
of 1661.[1]Contents1 History 2 Historiography 3 Legacy 4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingHistory[edit] The Act of Uniformity prescribed that any minister who refused to conform to the Book of Common Prayer
Book of Common Prayer
by St. Bartholomew's Day
St. Bartholomew's Day
(24 August) 1662 should be ejected from the Church of England
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Title Page
The title page of a book, thesis or other written work is the page at or near the front which displays its title, subtitle, author, publisher, and edition
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Thomas Brooks (Puritan)
Thomas Brooks (1608–1680) was an English non-conformist Puritan preacher and author.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 References 4 External linksLife[edit] Much of what is known about Thomas Brooks has been ascertained from his writings.[1] Born, likely to well-to-do parents, in 1608, Brooks entered Emmanuel College, Cambridge
Emmanuel College, Cambridge
in 1625,[2][3] where he was preceded by such men as Thomas Hooker, John Cotton, and Thomas Shepard. He was licensed as a preacher of the Gospel
Gospel
by 1640. Before that date, he appears to have spent a number of years at sea, probably as a chaplain with the fleet. After the conclusion of the First English Civil War, Thomas Brooks became minister at Thomas Apostle's, London,[4] and was sufficiently renowned to be chosen as preacher before the House of Commons on December 26, 1648
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Banner Of Truth Trust
The Banner of Truth Trust
Banner of Truth Trust
is an evangelical and Reformed
Reformed
Christian non-profit[1] publishing house, structured as a charitable trust[2] and founded in
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Leslie Stephen
Sir Leslie Stephen
Leslie Stephen
KCB (28 November 1832 – 22 February 1904) was an English author, critic, historian, biographer, and mountaineer, and father of Virginia Woolf
Virginia Woolf
and Vanessa Bell.Contents1 Life1.1 Marriage1.1.1 (1) Harriet (Minny) Thackeray 1867–1875 1.1.2 (2) Julia Duckworth
Julia Duckworth
1878–18951.2 Career 1.3 Mountaineering2 List of selected publications 3 Death 4 Family tree 5 References 6 Bibliography6.1 Anne Thackeray
Anne Thackeray
Ritchie7 External links7.1 External imagesLife[edit] Sir Leslie Stephen
Leslie Stephen
came from a distinguished intellectual family,[1] and was born at 14 (later renumbered 42) Hyde Park Gate, Kensington
Kensington
in London, the son of Sir James Stephen and (Lady) Jane Catherine (née Venn) Stephen
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Dictionary Of National Biography
The Dictionary of National Biography
Biography
(DNB) is a standard work of reference on notable figures from British history, published from 1885. The updated Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
Biography
(ODNB) was published on 23 September 2004 in 60 volumes and online, with 50,113 biographical articles covering 54,922 lives.Contents1 First series 2 Supplements and revisions 3 Concise dictionary 4 Oxford Dictionary of National Biography 5 First series contents 6 See also 7 Notes 8 External linksFirst series[edit] Hoping to emulate national biographical collections published elsewhere in Europe, such as the Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie (1875), in 1882 the publisher George Smith (1824–1901), of Smith, Elder & Co., planned a universal dictionary that would include biographical entries on individuals from world history. He approached Leslie Stephen, then editor of the Cornhill Magazine, owned by Smith, to become the editor
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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United Reformed Church
The United Reformed
Reformed
Church (URC) is a Christian
Christian
church in the United Kingdom
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Archbishop Of Canterbury
The Archbishop of Canterbury
Canterbury
is the senior bishop and principal leader of the Church of England, the symbolic head of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the diocesan bishop of the Diocese of Canterbury. The current archbishop is Justin Welby, who was enthroned at Canterbury Cathedral on 21 March 2013. Welby is the 105th in a line which goes back more than 1400 years to Augustine of Canterbury, the "Apostle to the English", sent from Rome
Rome
in the year 597. Welby succeeded Rowan Williams.[1] From the time of Augustine until the 16th century, the Archbishops of Canterbury
Canterbury
were in full communion with the See of Rome
Rome
and usually received the pallium from the Pope. During the English Reformation, the Church of England
Church of England
broke away from the authority of the Catholic Church
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Rowan Williams
Rowan Douglas Williams, Baron Williams of Oystermouth PC FBA FRSL FLSW (born 14 June 1950) is a Welsh Anglican bishop, theologian and poet. Williams was the 104th Archbishop of Canterbury, Metropolitan of the Province of Canterbury, and Primate of All England, offices he held from December 2002 to December 2012.[4][5] He was previously the Bishop of Monmouth
Bishop of Monmouth
and Archbishop of Wales, making him the first Archbishop of Canterbury
Archbishop of Canterbury
in modern times not to be appointed from within the Church of England. Williams spent much of his earlier career as an academic at the Universities of Cambridge and Oxford successively. He speaks three languages and reads at least nine.[6] Williams' primacy was marked by speculation that the Anglican Communion (in which the Archbishop of Canterbury
Archbishop of Canterbury
is the leading figure) was on the verge of fragmentation
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Westminster Abbey
Westminster Abbey, formally titled the Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, is a large, mainly Gothic abbey church in the City of Westminster, London, England, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. It is one of the United Kingdom's most notable religious buildings and the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English and, later, British monarchs. The building itself was a Benedictine
Benedictine
monastic church until the monastery was dissolved in 1539. Between 1540 and 1556, the abbey had the status of a cathedral
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J. C. Ryle
John Charles Ryle (10 May 1816 – 10 June 1900) was an English Evangelical Anglican bishop. He was the first Anglican bishop of Liverpool.Contents1 Life 2 Family 3 Legacy 4 Published works 5 References 6 External linksLife[edit] He was the eldest son of John Ryle, private banker, of Park House, Macclesfield, M.P. for Macclesfield
Macclesfield
1833-7, and Susanna, daughter of Charles Hurt of Wirksworth, Derbyshire. He was born at Macclesfield
Macclesfield
on 10 May 1816.[1] He was educated at Eton and the University of Oxford, where his career was unusually distinguished. He was Fell exhibitioner at Christ Church, from which foundation he matriculated on 15 May 1834. He was Craven scholar in 1836, graduated B.A. in 1838, having been placed in the first-class in literæ humaniores in the preceding year, and proceeded M.A. in 1871. He was created D.D
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Iain Murray (author)
Iain Hamish Murray (born 1931) is a British pastor and author. He was educated in the Isle of Man at King William's College. He held a commission in the Cameronians (Scottish Rifles)[1] rifle regiment of the British Army, serving in Singapore and Malaya in the suppression of the communist insurgency known as the "Malayan Emergency". After his military service, Murray studied Philosophy and History at the University of Durham. In 1955 he married Jean Ann Walters and became assistant minister at St. John's Free Church, Summertown, Oxford.[2][3] He served as assistant to Martyn Lloyd-Jones at Westminster Chapel[4] (1956–59) and subsequently at Grove Chapel, London (1961–69) and St. Giles Presbyterian Church, Sydney, Australia, (1981–84)
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John Relly Beard
John Relly Beard (4 August 1800 – 22 November 1876) was an English Unitarian minister, schoolmaster, university lecturer, and translator who co-founded Unitarian College Manchester and wrote more than thirty books.Contents1 Life 2 Children 3 Works 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] He was born in Portsmouth on 4 August 1800, the first child of a tradesman, John Beard, and his wife Ann Paine. After attending the Grammar School in Portsmouth and a brief period in a French boarding-school, he joined Manchester College, York in 1820 and studied under Charles Wellbeloved, a pioneering translator of the Old Testament. One of his fellow students there was William Gaskell (whose wife Elizabeth became the famous novelist) and they remained lifelong friends. After his training Beard became a Unitarian minister at Greengate, Salford in 1825. Alongside his ministry, he ran a school which was so successful that he built a house to accommodate it
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Thomas Doolittle
Thomas Doolittle (1632?–1707) was an English nonconformist minister, tutor and author.Contents1 Early life 2 Ejected minister 3 After 1689 4 Works 5 Family 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Doolittle was the third son of Anthony Doolittle, a glover, and was born at Kidderminster in 1632 or the latter half of 1631. While at the grammar school of his native town he heard Richard Baxter preach as lecturer (appointed 5 April 1641) the sermons later published as ‘The Saint's Everlasting Rest’ (1653). These discourses produced a conversion. Placed with a country attorney, he objected to copying writings on Sunday, and went home determined not to follow the law. Baxter encouraged him to enter the ministry. He was admitted as a sizar at Pembroke Hall, Cambridge, on 7 June 1649, then aged 17. His tutor was William Moses, later ejected from the mastership of Pembroke. Doolittle graduated M.A
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