HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Great Depression
The GREAT DEPRESSION was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, originating in the United States . The timing of the Great Depression
Great Depression
varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until 1941. It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century. In the 21st century, the Great Depression
Great Depression
is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline. The depression started in the United States after a major fall in stock prices that began around September 4, 1929, and became worldwide news with the stock market crash of October 29, 1929 (known as Black Tuesday ). Between 1929 and 1932, worldwide gross domestic product (GDP) fell by an estimated 15%. By comparison, worldwide GDP fell by less than 1% from 2008 to 2009 during the Great Recession
[...More...]

"Great Depression" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Developed Country
A DEVELOPED COUNTRY, INDUSTRIALIZED COUNTRY, MORE DEVELOPED COUNTRY, or "MORE ECONOMICALLY DEVELOPED COUNTRY" (MEDC), is a sovereign state that has a highly developed economy and advanced technological infrastructure relative to other less industrialized nations. Most commonly, the criteria for evaluating the degree of economic development are gross domestic product (GDP), gross national product (GNP), the per capita income , level of industrialization, amount of widespread infrastructure and general standard of living. Which criteria are to be used and which countries can be classified as being developed are subjects of debate. Developed countries have post-industrial economies, meaning the service sector provides more wealth than the industrial sector . They are contrasted with developing countries , which are in the process of industrialization , or undeveloped countries, which are pre-industrial and almost entirely agrarian
[...More...]

"Developed Country" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

World War II
Allied victory * Collapse of Nazi Germany
Nazi Germany
* Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires * Dissolution of the League of Nations
League of Nations
* Creation of the United Nations
United Nations
* Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers * Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more... ) PARTICIPANTS ALLIED POWERS AXIS POWERS COMMANDERS AND LEADERS MAIN ALLIED LEADERS * Joseph Stalin
Joseph Stalin
* Franklin D
[...More...]

"World War II" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

John D. Rockefeller
Founding the University of Chicago
University of Chicago
, Rockefeller University
Rockefeller University
, Central Philippine University , General Education Board and Rockefeller Foundation NET WORTH US$392 billion (in 2016 dollars; inflation-adjusted) in 1913, according to Forbes
Forbes
(1.5% to 2% of the United States
United States
economy; or approximately 1/65th to 1/50th of its GDP
GDP
) POLITICAL PARTY Republican SPOUSE(S) Laura Celestia Spelman (m. 1864–1915; her death) CHILDREN Elizabeth , Alice, Alta , Edith , and John Jr. PARENT(S) * William Avery Rockefeller * Eliza Davison RELATIVES Rockefeller family JOHN DAVISON ROCKEFELLER SR. (July 8, 1839 – May 23, 1937) was an American oil industry business magnate and philanthropist
[...More...]

"John D. Rockefeller" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Developing Country
A DEVELOPING COUNTRY, also called a LESS DEVELOPED COUNTRY or an UNDERDEVELOPED COUNTRY, is a nation or a sovereign state with a less developed industrial base and a low Human Development Index
Human Development Index
(HDI) relative to other countries. There are no universally agreed-upon criteria for what makes a country developing versus developed and which countries fit these two categories, although there are general reference points such as a nation's GDP per capita
GDP per capita
compared with other nations. Also the general term less-developed country should not be confused with the specific least developed country . The term "developing" describes a currently observed situation and not a dynamic or expected direction of progress. Since the late 1990s developing countries tended to demonstrate higher growth rates than the developed ones. There is criticism for using the term developing country
[...More...]

"Developing Country" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Public Works
PUBLIC WORKS (or INTERNAL IMPROVEMENTS historically in the United States) are a broad category of infrastructure projects, financed and constructed by the government , for recreational, employment, and health and safety uses in the greater community . They include public buildings (municipal buildings , schools , hospitals ), transport infrastructure (roads , railroads , bridges , pipelines , canals , ports , airports ), public spaces (public squares , parks , beaches ), public services (water supply , sewage , electrical grid , dams ), and other, usually long-term, physical assets and facilities . Though often interchangeable with public infrastructure and public capital , public works does not necessarily carry an economic component, thereby being a broader term
[...More...]

"Public Works" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aggregate Expenditure
In economics, AGGREGATE EXPENDITURE (AE) is a measure of national income . Aggregate expenditure
Aggregate expenditure
is defined as the current value of all the finished goods and services in the economy. The aggregate expenditure is thus the sum total of all the expenditures undertaken in the economy by the factors during a given time period. It refers to the expenditure incurred on consumer goods, planned investment and the expenditure made by the government in the economy. In an open economy scenario, the aggregate expenditure also includes the difference between the exports and the imports
[...More...]

"Aggregate Expenditure" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Primary Sector Of The Economy
The PRIMARY SECTOR OF THE ECONOMY is the sector of an economy making direct use of natural resources or exploit natural resources. This includes agriculture , forestry , fishing and mining The manufacturing industries that aggregate, pack, package, purify or process the raw materials close to the primary producers are normally considered part of this sector, especially if the raw material is unsuitable for sale or difficult to transport long distances. Primary industry is a larger sector in developing countries ; for instance, animal husbandry is more common in Africa
Africa
than in Japan
Japan
. Mining
Mining
in 19th-century South Wales provides a case study of how an economy can come to rely on one form of activity
[...More...]

"Primary Sector Of The Economy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Heavy Industry
HEAVY INDUSTRY is industry that involves one or more characteristics such as large and heavy products; large and heavy equipment and facilities (such as heavy equipment , large machine tools , and huge buildings ); or complex or numerous processes . Because of those factors, heavy industry involves higher capital intensity than light industry does, and it is also often more heavily cyclical in investment and employment . Transportation and construction along with their upstream manufacturing supply businesses have been the bulk of heavy industry throughout the industrial age, along with some capital-intensive manufacturing
[...More...]

"Heavy Industry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Government Spending
GOVERNMENT SPENDING or EXPENDITURE includes all government consumption, investment, and transfer payments. In national income accounting the acquisition by governments of goods and services for current use, to directly satisfy the individual or collective needs of the community, is classed as government final consumption expenditure . Government acquisition of goods and services intended to create future benefits , such as infrastructure investment or research spending, is classed as government investment (government gross capital formation ). These two types of government spending, on final consumption and on gross capital formation, together constitute one of the major components of gross domestic product . Government spending
Government spending
can be financed by government borrowing , seigniorage , or taxes . Changes in government spending is a major component of fiscal policy used to stabilize the macroeconomic business cycle
[...More...]

"Government Spending" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Wall Street Crash Of 1929
A STREET is a public thoroughfare (usually paved) in a built environment. It is a public parcel of land adjoining buildings in an urban context, on which people may freely assemble, interact, and move about. A street can be as simple as a level patch of dirt , but is more often paved with a hard, durable surface such as concrete , cobblestone or brick . Portions may also be smoothed with asphalt , embedded with rails , or otherwise prepared to accommodate non-pedestrian traffic. Originally the word "street" simply meant a paved road (Latin: "via strata"). The word "street" is still sometimes used colloquially as a synonym for "road ", for example in connection with the ancient Watling Street
Watling Street
, but city residents and urban planners draw a crucial modern distinction: a road's main function is transportation, while streets facilitate public interaction
[...More...]

"Wall Street Crash Of 1929" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Crisis (economic)
CRISIS THEORY, concerning the causes and consequences of the tendency for the rate of profit to fall in a capitalist system , is now generally associated with Marxian economics
Marxian economics
. Earlier analysis was provided by Jean Charles Léonard de Sismondi who provided the first suggestions of its systemic roots. John Stuart Mill in his "Of the Tendency of Profits to a Minimum" which forms Chapter IV of Book IV of his Principles of Political Economy and Chapter V, "Consequences of the Tendency of Profits to a Minimum", provides a conspectus of the then accepted understanding of a number of the key elements, after David Ricardo
David Ricardo
, but without Karl Marx
Karl Marx
's theoretical working out that Frederick Engels posthumously published in Capital, Volume III
[...More...]

"Crisis (economic)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Al Capone
ALPHONSE GABRIEL CAPONE (/æl kəˈpoʊn/ ; Italian pronunciation: January 17, 1899 – January 25, 1947), sometimes known by the nickname SCARFACE, was an American gangster who attained fame during the Prohibition
Prohibition
era as the co-founder and boss of the Chicago Outfit . His seven-year reign as crime boss ended when he was 33 years old. Capone was born in Brooklyn
Brooklyn
in New York City
New York City
to Italian immigrants . He was considered a Five Points Gang member who became a bouncer in organized crime premises such as brothels . In his early twenties, he moved to Chicago
Chicago
and became bodyguard and trusted factotum for Johnny Torrio , head of a criminal syndicate that illegally supplied alcohol—the forerunner of the Outfit—and that was politically protected through the Unione Siciliana
[...More...]

"Al Capone" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Monetarism
MONETARISM is a school of thought in monetary economics that emphasizes the role of governments in controlling the amount of money in circulation . Monetarist theory asserts that variations in the money supply have major influences on national output in the short run and on price levels over longer periods. Monetarists assert that the objectives of monetary policy are best met by targeting the growth rate of the money supply rather than by engaging in discretionary monetary policy . Monetarism
Monetarism
today is mainly associated with the work of Milton Friedman , who was among the generation of economists to accept Keynesian economics and then criticise Keynes's theory of gluts using fiscal policy (government spending)
[...More...]

"Monetarism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

The General Theory Of Employment, Interest And Money
THE GENERAL THEORY OF EMPLOYMENT, INTEREST AND MONEY was written by the English economist John Maynard Keynes
John Maynard Keynes
. The book, generally considered to be his magnum opus , is largely credited with creating the terminology and shape of modern macroeconomics . Published in February 1936, it sought to bring about a revolution, commonly referred to as the " Keynesian Revolution ", in the way some economists believe. Especially in relation to the proposition that a market economy tends naturally to restore itself to full employment after temporary shocks. Regarded widely as the cornerstone of Keynesian thought, the book challenged the established classical economics and introduced important concepts such as the consumption function , the multiplier , the marginal efficiency of capital , the principle of effective demand and liquidity preference
[...More...]

"The General Theory Of Employment, Interest And Money" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

The Great Slump (other)
The GREAT SLUMP is an alternative name for the Great Depression
Great Depression
, a dramatic, worldwide economic downturn beginning in the late 1920s and lasting through the 1930s
[...More...]

"The Great Slump (other)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.