HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Grand Admiral
Grand admiral
Grand admiral
is a historic naval rank, the highest rank in the several European navies that used it. It is best known for its use in Germany as Großadmiral
[...More...]

"Grand Admiral" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Flag Officer
A flag officer is a commissioned officer in a nation's armed forces senior enough to be entitled to fly a flag to mark the position from which the officer exercises command. The term is used differently in different countries:In many countries, a flag officer is a senior officer of the navy, specifically those who hold any of the admiral ranks; the term may or may not include the rank of commodore. In some countries, such as Bangladesh, the United States, Pakistan
Pakistan
and India, it may apply to all armed forces, not just the navy. This means generals can also be considered flag officers. In most Arab armies, liwa (Arabic: لواء), which can be translated as flag officer, is a specific rank, equivalent to a major general. However, "ensign" is debatably a more exact translation of the word. In principle, a flag officer commands several units called "flags" (or "ensigns") (i.e
[...More...]

"Flag Officer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Lieutenant (navy)
Lieutenant[nb 1] (abbreviated Lt, LT, LT(N), Lt(N), Lieut and LEUT, depending on nation) is a commissioned officer rank in many nations' navies. It is typically the most senior of junior officer ranks. The rank's insignia usually consists of two medium gold braid stripes and often the uppermost stripe features an executive curl. The now immediately senior rank of lieutenant commander was formerly a senior naval lieutenant rank. Many navies also use a subordinate rank of sub-lieutenant. The appointment of "first lieutenant" in many navies is held by a senior lieutenant. A navy lieutenant ranks higher than an army lieutenant; the navy rank of lieutenant is a NATO OF-2 (US grade O-3) and ranks with an army captain.Contents1 History 2 Rank insignia 3 "First lieutenant" in naval usage 4 See also 5 Notes 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] From at least 1580,[1] the lieutenant on a ship had been the officer immediately subordinate to the captain
[...More...]

"Lieutenant (navy)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Baton (symbol)
The ceremonial baton is a short, thick stick-like object, typically in wood or metal, that is traditionally the sign of a field marshal or a similar very high-ranking military officer, and carried as a piece of their uniform. The baton is distinguished from the swagger stick in being thicker and effectively without any practical function. Unlike a staff of office, a baton is not rested on the ground. Unlike a royal sceptre, a baton is typically flat-ended, not crowned on one end with an eagle or globe.Contents1 Ancient world 2 Middle ages to early modern period 3 Nazi Germany 4 Modern 5 In heraldry 6 See also 7 ReferencesAncient world[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (February 2018) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)The origin of the military baton is unclear
[...More...]

"Baton (symbol)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Five-star Rank
A five-star rank is a very senior military rank, first established in the United States in 1944, with a five-star general insignia,[1] and corresponding ranks in other countries. The rank is that of the most senior operational military commanders, and within NATO's "standard rank scale" it is designated by the code OF-10. Not all armed forces have such a rank, and in those that do the actual insignia of the "five-star ranks" may not contain five stars. For example: the insignia for the French OF-10 rank maréchal de France contains 7 stars; the insignia for the Portuguese marechal contains four gold stars; and many of the insignia of the ranks in Commonwealth of Nations contain no stars at all. Typically, five-star officers hold the rank of general of the army, admiral of the fleet, field marshal, marshal or general of the air force, and several other similarly named ranks. Five-star ranks are extremely senior—usually the highest ranks
[...More...]

"Five-star Rank" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fleet Admiral (US)
Fleet admiral (abbreviated FADM),[1] officially known as "Fleet Admiral of the United States Navy", is a five-star flag officer rank in the United States Navy. Fleet admiral ranks immediately above admiral and is equivalent to General of the Army and General of the Air Force. Although it is a current and authorized rank, no U.S. Navy officer presently holds it, with the last living U.S. Navy fleet admiral being Chester W. Nimitz, who died in 1966.Contents1 Early superior admiral ranks 2 Second World War 3 Post World War II 4 Ranks senior to fleet admiral 5 See also 6 ReferencesEarly superior admiral ranks[edit] The United States Navy
United States Navy
did not create admiral ranks until the American Civil War, and then only very hesitantly. David Farragut
David Farragut
was the first admiral in the U.S. Navy and wore a variety of elaborate sleeve insignia to denote his rank and position
[...More...]

"Fleet Admiral (US)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Admiral Of The Fleet (United Kingdom)
Admiral of the Fleet is a five-star naval officer rank and the highest rank of the British Royal Navy. The five-star NATO rank code is OF-10, although routine appointments ceased in 1995. The rank of Admiral of the Fleet is equivalent to a field marshal in the British Army or a marshal of the Royal Air Force.Contents1 History in Royal Navy 2 Admirals of the Fleet 3 See also 4 References 5 Sources 6 External linksHistory in Royal Navy[edit] The origins of the rank can be traced back to Sir John de Beauchamp, 1st Baron Beauchamp de Warwick, who was appointed 'Admiral of the King's Southern, Northern and Western Fleets' on 18 July 1360.[2] The appointment gave the command of the English navy to one person for the first time; the post would evolve into the post of Admiral of the Fleet.[3] In the days sailing ships the admiral distinctions then used by the Royal Navy when the fleet was divided into three divisions – red, white, or blue
[...More...]

"Admiral Of The Fleet (United Kingdom)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kriegsmarine
The Kriegsmarine
Kriegsmarine
(German pronunciation: [ˈkʁiːksmaˌʁiːnə], War Navy) was the navy of Nazi Germany
Nazi Germany
from 1935 to 1945. It superseded the Imperial German Navy
Navy
of the German Empire
German Empire
(1871–1918) and the inter-war Reichsmarine
Reichsmarine
(1919–1935) of the Weimar Republic
[...More...]

"Kriegsmarine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Imperial German Navy
The Imperial German Navy
Navy
(German: Kaiserliche Marine, "Imperial Navy") was the navy created at the time of the formation of the German Empire. It existed between 1871 and 1919, growing out of the small Prussian Navy
Navy
(from 1867 the North German Federal Navy), which primarily had the mission of coastal defence. Kaiser Wilhelm II greatly expanded the navy, and enlarged its mission. The key leader was Admiral
Admiral
Alfred von Tirpitz, who greatly expanded the size and quality of the navy, while adopting the sea power theories of American strategist Alfred Thayer Mahan. The result was a naval arms race with Britain as the German navy grew to become one of the greatest maritime forces in the world, second only to the Royal Navy. The German surface navy proved ineffective during World War I; its only major engagement, the Battle of Jutland, was indecisive
[...More...]

"Imperial German Navy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

French Army
The French Army, officially the Ground Army
Army
(French: Armée de terre [aʀme də tɛʀ]) (to distinguish it from the French Air Force, Armée de L'air or Air Army) is the land-based and largest component of the French Armed Forces. It is responsible to the Government of France, along with the other four components of the Armed Forces. The current Chief of Staff of the French Army
Chief of Staff of the French Army
(CEMAT) is General Jean-Pierre Bosser, a direct subordinate of the Chief of the Defence Staff (CEMA). General Bosser is also responsible, in part, to the Ministry of the Armed Forces for organization, preparation, use of forces, as well as planning and programming, equipment and Army
Army
future acquisitions
[...More...]

"French Army" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Marshal Of France
Marshal of France (French: Maréchal de France, plural Maréchaux de France) is a French military distinction, rather than a military rank, that is awarded to generals for exceptional achievements. The title has been awarded since 1185, though briefly abolished (1793–1804) and briefly dormant (1870–1916) during its centuries of existence. It was one of the Great Officers of the Crown of France
Great Officers of the Crown of France
during the Ancien Régime
Ancien Régime
and Bourbon Restoration, and one of the Grand Dignitaries of the Empire during the First French Empire
First French Empire
(when the title was Marshal of the Empire, not Marshal of France). A Marshal of France displays seven stars on each shoulder strap. A marshal also receives a baton: a blue cylinder with stars, formerly fleurs-de-lis during the monarchy and eagles during the First French Empire
[...More...]

"Marshal Of France" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Bourbon Restoration
The Bourbon Restoration was the period of French history following the fall of Napoleon in 1814 until the July Revolution of 1830. The brothers of executed Louis XVI of France came to power and reigned in highly conservative fashion, and exiled supporters of the monarchy returned to France. They were nonetheless unable to reverse most of the changes made by the French Revolution and Napoleon. At the Congress of Vienna they were treated respectfully, but had to give up all the territorial gains made since 1789. King Louis XVI of the House of Bourbon had been overthrown and executed during the French Revolution (1789–1799), which in turn was followed by Napoleon as ruler of France. A coalition of European powers defeated Napoleon in the War of the Sixth Coalition, ended the First Empire in 1814, and restored the monarchy to the brothers of Louis XVI. The Bourbon Restoration lasted from (about) 6 April 1814 until the popular uprisings of the July Revolution of 1830
[...More...]

"Bourbon Restoration" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Military Rank
Military ranks are a system of hierarchical relationships in armed forces,[1] police,[2] intelligence agencies or other institutions organized along military lines. Military ranks and the military rank system define among others dominance, authority, as well as roles and responsibility in a military hierarchy. The military rank system incorporates the principles of exercising power and authority, and the military chain of command – the succession of commanders superior to subordinates through which command is exercised – constructs an important component for organized collective action.[3] Usually, uniforms denote the bearer's rank by particular insignia affixed to the uniforms
[...More...]

"Military Rank" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Naval
A navy or maritime force is the branch of a nation's armed forces principally designated for naval and amphibious warfare; namely, lake-borne, riverine, littoral, or ocean-borne combat operations and related functions. It includes anything conducted by surface ships, amphibious ships, submarines, and seaborne aviation, as well as ancillary support, communications, training, and other fields. The strategic offensive role of a navy is projection of force into areas beyond a country's shores (for example, to protect sea-lanes, ferry troops, or attack other navies, ports, or shore installations). The strategic defensive purpose of a navy is to frustrate seaborne projection-of-force by enemies. The strategic task of the navy also may incorporate nuclear deterrence by use of submarine-launched ballistic missiles
[...More...]

"Naval" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Edward VII
Edward VII
Edward VII
(Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions
British Dominions
and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death in 1910. The eldest son of Queen Victoria
Queen Victoria
and Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, Edward was related to royalty throughout Europe. Before his accession to the throne, he was heir apparent and held the title of Prince of Wales
Prince of Wales
for longer than any of his predecessors. During the long reign of his mother, he was largely excluded from political power, and came to personify the fashionable, leisured elite. He travelled throughout Britain performing ceremonial public duties, and represented Britain on visits abroad
[...More...]

"Edward VII" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Squadron Vice-admiral
Squadron vice-admiral
Squadron vice-admiral
(French: Vice-amiral d'escadre) is a naval rank found in navies of the world which follow the French tradition of naval ranks. The squadron vice-admiral leads a squadron and is typically senior to a vice-admiral and junior to an admiral. In that sense, it is close to Lieutenant admiral as a literal translation of the corresponding designation.  This translation is not often used in practice, as the rank is usually kept in the original language or rendered as vice-admiral. The main navy to use the rank of squadron vice-admiral is the French Navy (vice-amiral d'escadre), where it is a four-star rank with a NATO code of OF-8, equivalent to corps general or lieutenant general in seniority
[...More...]

"Squadron Vice-admiral" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.