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Grafham Water Nature Reserve
Grafham Water
Grafham Water
is an 806.3 hectare biological Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) south-west of Huntingdon
Huntingdon
in Cambridgeshire. It was designated an SSSI in 1986.[1][2] It is a reservoir with a circumference of about 10 miles (16 km), and is the eighth largest reservoir in England by volume and the third largest by area at 1,550 acres (6.28 km²). An area of 114 hectares at the western end is a nature reserve managed by the Wildlife Trust for Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire
Cambridgeshire
and Northamptonshire.[3] The lake was created by filling a valley full of water which is retained by an earth and concrete dam built by W. & C
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Chippenham Fen And Snailwell Poor's Fen
Chippenham Fen and Snailwell Poor's Fen
Chippenham Fen and Snailwell Poor's Fen
is a 155.9 hectare biological Site of Special Scientific Interest
Site of Special Scientific Interest
south-east of Fordham in Cambridgeshire.[1][2] It is a Nature Conservation Review site, Grade I,[3] a Ramsar wetland site[4] and a Special
Special
Area of Conservation (part of the multi-site Fenland SAC).[5] It is managed by Natural England.[6] The site is described by Natural England as "of national importance for its wide range of wetland habitats and associated birds and insects". It has diverse habitats and flora, with several uncommon species in damp meadows
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Brackland Rough
Brackland Rough is a 10.7 hectare biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Fordham in Cambridgeshire.[1][2] It is managed by the Wildlife Trust for Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire and Northamptonshire as Fordham Woods.[3] This wet woodland site has semi-natural alder coppice, with ash, crack willow and silver birch. The ground flora has tall fens, together with herbs such as marsh marigold and yellow flag.[4] There is access by a footpath from River Lane. References[edit]^ a b c d "Designated Sites View: Brackland Rough". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 6 November 2016.  ^ "Map of Brackland Rough". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 6 November 2016.  ^ "Fordham Woods". Wildlife Trust for Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire and Northamptonshire. Retrieved 6 November 2016.  ^ "Brackland Rough citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England
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List Of Sites Of Special Scientific Interest In Cambridgeshire
Cambridgeshire is a county in eastern England, with an area of 339,746 hectares (1,312 sq mi)[1] and a population as of mid-2015 of 841,218.[2] It is crossed by the Nene and the Great Ouse rivers. The University of Cambridge, which was founded in the thirteenth century, made the county one of the country's most important intellectual centres. A large part of the county is in The Fens, and drainage of this habitat, which probably commenced in the Roman period and was largely completed by the seventeenth century, considerably increased the area available for agriculture. The main manufacturing area is Peterborough.[3] The administrative county was formed in 1974, incorporating most of the historic county of Huntingdonshire.[3] Local government is divided between Cambridgeshire County Council and Peterborough City Council, which is a separate unitary authority
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Biological
A biopharmaceutical, also known as a biologic(al) medical product, biological,[1] or biologic, is any pharmaceutical drug product manufactured in, extracted from, or semisynthesized from biological sources. Different from totally synthesized pharmaceuticals, they include vaccines, blood, blood components, allergenics, somatic cells, gene therapies, tissues, recombinant therapeutic protein, and living cells used in cell therapy. Biologics can be composed of sugars, proteins, or nucleic acids or complex combinations of these substances, or may be living cells or tissues. They (or their precursors or components) are isolated from living sources—human, animal, plant, fungal, or microbial. Terminology surrounding biopharmaceuticals varies between groups and entities, with different terms referring to different subsets of therapeutics within the general biopharmaceutical category
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Alder Carr
Alder Carr
Alder Carr
is a 6.7 hectare biological Site of Special
Special
Scientific Interest in Hildersham
Hildersham
in Cambridgeshire.[1][2] The site is a wet valley which has alder on fen peat, a type of woodland which is now rare in East Anglia. Ground flora include angelica and meadowsweet. This habitat is very valuable to invertebrates.[3] The site is private land with no public access. References[edit]^ a b c d "Designated Sites View: Alder Carr". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 4 September 2016.  ^ "Map of Alder Carr". Sites of Special
Special
Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 4 September 2016.  ^ " Alder Carr
Alder Carr
citation" (PDF). Sites of Special
Special
Scientific Interest. Natural England
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Aversley Wood
Aversley Wood
Aversley Wood
is a 62.3 hectares (154 acres) biological Site of Special
Special
Scientific Interest south-west of Sawtry
Sawtry
in Cambridgeshire.[1][2] It is owned and managed by the Woodland Trust.[3] This wood is ash and maple on heavy clay soils, with much of it being ancient and having diverse flora and fauna as a result. Another area, which was probably cultivated until around 1350, has medieval ridge and furrow. It has a number of wild service trees, which are uncommon and an indicator of ancient woodland.[4] There is access from Bullock Road. References[edit]^ a b c d "Designated Sites View: Aversley Wood". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 28 November 2016.  ^ "Map of Aversley Wood". Sites of Special
Special
Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 28 November 2016.  ^ "Aversley Wood". Woodland Trust
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Balsham Wood
Balsham Wood is a 35 hectare biological Site of Special Scientific Interest south of Balsham in Cambridgeshire.[1][2] This site has one of the last surviving areas of ash and maple woodland on chalky boulder clay. It has diverse flora, including the rare oxlip and a variety of shrubs, such as dogwood. Open grassy rides provide additional habitats.[3] The site is private land with no public access. References[edit]^ a b c d "Designated Sites View: Balsham Wood". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 4 September 2016.  ^ "Map of Balsham Wood". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 4 September 2016.  ^ "Balsham Wood citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England
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Barnack Hills & Holes National Nature Reserve
Barnack
Barnack
Hills & Holes is a 23.3 hectare biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Barnack
Barnack
in Cambridgeshire.[1][2] It is also a national nature reserve.[3] It is a Nature Conservation Review site, Grade I.[4] In 2002 it was designated as a Special
Special
Area of Conservation, to protect the orchid rich grassland as part of the Natura 2000
Natura 2000
network of sites throughout the European Union.[5] Arising from the rubble of a medieval quarry, the Hills and Holes is one of Britain’s most important wildlife sites. Covering an area of just 50 acres (22 ha), the grassy slopes are home to a profusion of wild flowers. This type of meadowland is now all too rare; half of the surviving limestone grassland in Cambridgeshire
Cambridgeshire
is found here
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Bassenhally Pit
Bassenhally Pit is an 8.6 hectare biological Site of Special Scientific Interest north-east of Whittlesey in Cambridgeshire]].[1][2] This former gravel quarry has diverse habitats, such as a pond, marshes, grassland, scrub and woodland. The marsh is a nationally scarce habitat, and it has plants including jointed rush, creeping bent, lesser water-plantain, early marsh-orchid and water violet.[3] The site is owned by the Whittlesey Wildfowlers and Conservationists, and there is no public access. References[edit]^ a b c d "Designated Sites View: Bassenhally Pit". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 9 October 2016.  ^ "Map of Bassenhally Pit". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 9 October 2016.  ^ "Bassenhally Pit citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original (PDF) on 3 March 2016
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Bedford Purlieus National Nature Reserve
Bedford Purlieus is a 211-hectare (520-acre) ancient woodland in Cambridgeshire, in the United Kingdom. It is a national nature reserve and Site of Special Scientific Interest owned and managed by the Forestry Commission. In Thornhaugh civil parish, 10 km (6.2 mi) south of Stamford and 14 km (8.7 mi) west of Peterborough, the wood is within the Peterborough unitary authority area of Cambridgeshire, and borders Northamptonshire. In Roman times it was an iron smelting centre, during the medieval period it was in the Royal Forest of Rockingham, and later it became part of the estates of the Duke of Bedford. Bedford Purlieus appears to have been continuously wooded at least from Roman times, and probably since the ice receded. The woodland may have the richest range of vascular plants of any English lowland wood
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Berry Fen
Berry Fen is a 15.3 hectare biological Site of Special Scientific Interest on the Western outskirts of Earith in Cambridgeshire.[1][2] This neutral grassland periodically floods in the winter. It is used by wintering wildfowl, including Bewick's swans in nationally numbers, especially when the nearby Ouse Washes flood too deeply. There are wetland herbs such as marsh ragwort and the rare narrow-leaved water-dropwort.[3] The site is private land with no public access. References[edit]^ a b c d "Designated Sites View: Berry Fen". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 17 December 2016.  ^ "Map of Berry Fen". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 17 December 2016.  ^ "Berry Fen citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England
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Bonemills Hollow
Bonemills Hollow is a 17.5 hectare biological Site of Special Scientific Interest east of Wittering in Cambridgeshire.[1][2] The valley has marsh and Jurassic calcareous grassland areas. The marshland is on the valley floor, and dominant species are lesser pond-sedge and the rushes Juncus articulatus and Juncus inflexus. Areas of scrub and willow carr provide additional habitats for invertebrates and birds.[3] The site is private land with no public access. References[edit]^ a b c d "Designated Sites View: Bonemills Hollow". Natural England. Retrieved 28 August 2016.  ^ "Map of Bonemills Hollow". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 28 August 2016.  ^ "Bonemills Hollow citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 March 2016
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Brampton Meadow
Brampton Meadow is a one hectare biological Site of Special Scientific Interest north-west of Brampton in Cambridgeshire.[1][2] The site has a rich variety of plant species on calcareous clay pasture, a declining habitat. Plants include quaking-grass, adder's tongue fern, cowslip and green-winged orchid.[3] The site is on private land with no public access. References[edit]^ a b c d "Designated Sites View: Brampton Meadow". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 13 September 2016.  ^ "Map of Brampton Meadow". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 13 September 2016.  ^ "Brampton Meadow citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original (PDF) on 3 March 2016
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BBC News
BBC
BBC
News is an operational business division[1] of the British Broadcasting
Broadcasting
Corporation (BBC) responsible for the gathering and broadcasting of news and current affairs
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Brampton Racecourse
Brampton Racecourse is a 21.1 hectare biological Site of Special Scientific Interest north of Brampton in Cambridgeshire.[1][2] The site is also a horse racing venue called Huntingdon Racecourse. The site is species-rich neutral grassland, a rare habitat in the county, in the flood plain of Alconbury Brook. Plants include salad burnet, pepper-saxifrage, and the largest population in of green-winged orchid in Cambridgeshire.[3] References[edit]^ a b c d "Designated Sites View: Brampton Racecourse". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 13 September 2016.  ^ "Map of Brampton Racecourse". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 13 September 2016.  ^ "Brampton Racecoursecitation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 March 2016
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