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Goryeo
Gaegyeong (919–1232, 1270–1390, 1391-1392) Ganghwa (1232–1270) Namgyeong (1390-1391)Languages Middle KoreanReligion Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shamanism (Sindo)Government MonarchyKing •  918–943 Taejo (first) •  949–975 Gwangjong •  981–997 Seongjong •  1046–1083 Munjong •  1351–1374 Gongmin •  1389–1392 Gongyang (last)Military regime leader •  1170-1174 Yi Ui-bang (first) •  1174–1179 Jeong Jung-bu •  1196–1219 Choe Chung-heon •  1270 Im Yu-mu (last)History • 
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Tang Dynasty
The Tang dynasty
Tang dynasty
or the Tang Empire
Empire
(/tɑːŋ/;[3] Chinese: 唐朝[a]) was an imperial dynasty of China preceded by the Sui dynasty
Sui dynasty
and followed by the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period. It is generally regarded as a high point in Chinese civilization, and a golden age of cosmopolitan culture.[5] Its territory, acquired through the military campaigns of its early rulers, rivaled that of the Han dynasty, and the Tang capital at Chang'an
Chang'an
(present-day Xi'an) was the most populous city in the world. The dynasty was founded by the Lǐ family (李), who seized power during the decline and collapse of the Sui Empire
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Wonsan
Wŏnsan (Korean pronunciation: [wʌn.san]), previously known as Wŏnsanjin (元山津), Port Lazarev, and Gensan (元山), is a port city and naval base located in Kangwŏn Province, North Korea, along the eastern side of the Korean Peninsula, on the Sea of Japan
Sea of Japan
(East Sea) and the provincial capital. The port was opened by occupying Japanese forces in 1880. Before the 1950–1953 Korean War, it fell within the jurisdiction of the then South Hamgyŏng province, and during the war it was the location of the Blockade of Wŏnsan. The population of the city was estimated at 329,207 in 2013. Notable people from Wŏnsan include Kim Ki Nam, diplomat and Secretary of the Korean Workers' Party
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Hangul
Hangul
Hangul
(/ˈhɑːnˌɡuːl/ HAHN-gool;[1] from Korean hangeul 한글 [ha(ː)n.ɡɯl]) is the Korean alphabet. It has been used to write the Korean language
Korean language
since its creation in the 15th century under Sejong the Great.[2][3] It is the official writing system of South Korea
South Korea
and North Korea. It is a co-official writing system in the Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture and Changbai Korean Autonomous County
Changbai Korean Autonomous County
in Jilin
Jilin
Province, China. It is sometimes used to write the Cia-Cia language
Cia-Cia language
spoken near the town of Bau-Bau, Indonesia. The alphabet consists of 19 consonants and 21 vowels. Hangul
Hangul
letters are grouped into syllabic blocks, vertically and horizontally
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Revised Romanization Of Korean
The Revised Romanization of Korean
Romanization of Korean
(국어의 로마자 표기법; gugeoui romaja pyogibeop. op; lit. "Roman-letter notation of the national language") is the official Korean language romanization system in South Korea
South Korea
proclaimed by the Ministry of Culture and Tourism to replace the older McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
system. The new system eliminates diacritics in favor of digraphs and adheres more closely to Korean phonology than to a suggestive rendition of Korean phonetics for non-native speakers. The Revised Romanization limits itself to the ISO basic Latin alphabet, apart from limited, often optional use of the hyphen. It was developed by the National Academy of the Korean Language from 1995 and was released to the public on 7 July 2000 by South Korea's Ministry of Culture and Tourism in Proclamation No
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McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
romanization (/məˈkuːn ˈraɪʃaʊ.ər/) is one of the two most widely used Korean language
Korean language
romanization systems. A modified version of McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
was the official romanization system in South Korea
South Korea
until 2000, when it was replaced by the Revised Romanization of Korean
Romanization of Korean
system. A variant of McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
is still used as the official system in North Korea.[citation needed] The system was created in 1937 by George M. McCune and Edwin O. Reischauer
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Exonym And Endonym
An exonym or xenonym is an external name for a geographical place, or a group of people, an individual person, or a language or dialect. It is a common name used only outside the place, group, or linguistic community in question. An endonym or autonym is an internal name for a geographical place, or a group of people, or a language or dialect
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Monarchy
A monarchy is a form of government in which a group, generally a family representing a dynasty (aristocracy), embodies the country's national identity and its head, the monarch, exercises the role of sovereignty. The actual power of the monarch may vary from purely symbolic (crowned republic), to partial and restricted (constitutional monarchy), to completely autocratic (absolute monarchy). Traditionally the monarch's post is inherited and lasts until death or abdication. In contrast, elective monarchies require the monarch to be elected.[1] Both types have further variations as there are widely divergent structures and traditions defining monarchy. For example, in some[which?] elected monarchies only pedigrees are taken into account for eligibility of the next ruler, whereas many hereditary monarchies impose requirements regarding the religion, age, gender, mental capacity, etc
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Later Three Kingdoms
Kingdom
Kingdom
may refer to:Contents1 Monarchy 2 Taxonomy 3 Arts and media3.1 Television 3.2 Music 3.3 Other media4 People 5 Other 6 See alsoMonarchy[edit] Further information: List of kingdoms A type of monarchy:A realm ruled bya king a queen regnantTaxonomy[edit] Kingdom
Kingdom
(taxonomy), a category in biological taxonomyArts and media[edit] Television[edit] Kingdom
Kingdom
(UK TV series), a 2007 British television drama starring Stephen Fry Kingdom
Kingdom
(U.S
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List Of Countries By Population
This is a list of countries and dependent territories by population. It includes sovereign states, inhabited dependent territories and, in some cases, constituent countries of sovereign states, with inclusion within the list being primarily based on the ISO standard ISO 3166-1. For instance, the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
is considered as a single entity while the constituent countries of the Kingdom of the Netherlands
Kingdom of the Netherlands
are considered separately. In addition, this list includes certain states with limited recognition not found in ISO 3166-1. The population figures do not reflect the practice of countries that report significantly different populations of citizens domestically and overall
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Yalu River
The Yalu River, also called the Amrok River
River
or Amnok River, is a river on the border between North Korea
North Korea
and China. Together with the Tumen River
River
to its east, and a small portion of Paektu Mountain, the Yalu forms the border between North Korea
North Korea
and China
China
and is notable as a site involved in military conflicts such as the First Sino-Japanese War, the Russo-Japanese War, World War II, and the Korean War.Contents1 Name 2 Geography 3 History 4 Economy 5 Crossings 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksName[edit] There are two theories regarding the origin of the river's name. One theory is that the name derived from "Yalv ula" in the Manchu language. The Manchu word "Yalu" means "the boundary between two countries"
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Tripiṭaka
Tripiṭaka, also referred to as Tipiṭaka, is the traditional term for the Buddhist scriptures.[1][2] The version canonical to Theravada Buddhism
Buddhism
is often referred to as Pali
Pali
Canon in English. Mahayana Buddhism
Buddhism
also reveres the Tripitaka as authoritative but, unlike Theravadins, it also reveres various derivative literature and commentaries that were composed much later.[1][3] The Tripitakas were composed between about 500 BCE to about the start of the common era, likely written down for the first time in the 1st century BCE.[3] The Dipavamsa
Dipavamsa
states that during the reign of Valagamba of Anuradhapura
Valagamba of Anuradhapura
(29–17 BCE) the monks who had previously remembered the Tipitaka and its commentary orally now wrote them down in books, because of the threat posed by famine and war
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Monarch
A monarch is a sovereign head of state in a monarchy.[1][2] A monarch may exercise the highest authority and power in the state, or others may wield that power on behalf of the monarch. Typically a monarch either personally inherits the lawful right to exercise the state's sovereign rights (often referred to as the throne or the crown) or is selected by an established process from a family or cohort eligible to provide the nation's monarch. Alternatively, an individual may become monarch by conquest, acclamation or a combination of means
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Hanja
Hanja
Hanja
(Hangul: 한자; Hanja: 漢字; Korean pronunciation: [ha(ː)nt͈ɕa]) is the Korean name
Korean name
for Chinese characters (Chinese: 漢字; pinyin: hànzì).[1] More specifically, it refers to those Chinese characters
Chinese characters
borrowed from Chinese and incorporated into the Korean language
Korean language
with Korean pronunciation. Hanja-mal or Hanja-eo (the latter is more used) refers to words that can be written with Hanja, and hanmun (한문, 漢文) refers to Classical Chinese
Classical Chinese
writing, although "Hanja" is sometimes used loosely to encompass these other concepts. Because Hanja
Hanja
never underwent major reform, they are almost entirely identical to traditional Chinese and kyūjitai characters, though the stroke orders for some characters are slightly different
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Korean Peninsula
The Korean Peninsula
Peninsula
is a peninsula in East Asia. It extends southwards for about 1,100 km (680 mi) from continental Asia into the Pacific Ocean
Pacific Ocean
and is surrounded by the Sea of Japan
Sea of Japan
(East Sea) to the east, and the Yellow Sea
Yellow Sea
to the west, the Korea
Korea
Strait connecting the first two bodies of water.Contents1 Name 2 History 3 Comparison of the two countries on the Korean Peninsula 4 Flora and fauna 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksName[edit] The peninsula's names in Korean, Chinese and Japanese all have the same origin, that being Joseon, the old name of Korea
Korea
under the Joseon Dynasty and Gojoseon
Gojoseon
even longer before that
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Haeinsa
Coordinates: 35°48′N 128°6′E / 35.800°N 128.100°E / 35.800; 128.100 Haeinsa (해인사, 海印寺: Temple of the Ocean Mudra) is a head temple of the Jogye Order (대한불교조계종, 大韓佛敎 曹溪宗) of Korean Seon Buddhism in Gayasan National Park (가야산, 伽倻山), South Gyeongsang Province, South Korea. Haeinsa is most notable for being the home of the Tripitaka Koreana, the whole of the Buddhist Scriptures carved onto 81,350 wooden printing blocks, which it has housed since 1398.[1] Haeinsa is one of the Three Jewels Temples, and represents Dharma or the Buddha’s teachings. It is still an active Seon (선, 禪) practice center in modern times, and was the home temple of the influential Seon master Seongcheol (성철, 性徹), who died in 1993.Contents1 History1.1 Crisis2 Janggyeong Panjeon (National Treasure No.52) 3 Tourism 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The temple was first built in 802
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