HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Goods Yard
A goods station (also known as a goods yard or goods depot) or freight station is, in the widest sense, a railway station which is exclusively or predominantly where goods (or freight), such as merchandise, parcels and manufactured items, are loaded or unloaded from ships or road vehicles and/or where goods wagons are transferred to local sidings.[1] A station where goods are not specifically received or dispatched, but simply transferred on their way to their destination between the railway and another means of transport, such as ships or lorries, may be referred to as a transshipment station
[...More...]

"Goods Yard" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Lucerne
Lucerne
Lucerne
(/ˌluːˈsɜːrn/; German: Luzern [luˈtsɛrn] ( listen); French: Lucerne
Lucerne
[lysɛʁn]; Italian: Lucerna [luˈtʃɛrna]; Romansh: Lucerna; Lucerne
Lucerne
Swiss-German: Lozärn) is a city in central Switzerland, in the German-speaking portion of the country. Lucerne
Lucerne
is the capital of the canton of Lucerne
Lucerne
and part of the district of the same name. With a population of about 81,057 people (as of 2013[update]),[3] Lucerne
Lucerne
is the most populous town in Central Switzerland, and a nexus of economics, transportation, culture, and media of this region
[...More...]

"Lucerne" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Hump Yard
A classification yard (American and Canadian English) or marshalling yard (British, Hong Kong, Indian, Australian and Canadian English) is a railway yard found at some freight train stations, used to separate railway cars onto one of several tracks. First the cars are taken to a track, sometimes called a lead or a drill. From there the cars are sent through a series of switches called a ladder onto the classification tracks. Larger yards tend to put the lead on an artificially built hill called a hump to use the force of gravity to propel the cars through the ladder. Freight trains that consist of isolated cars must be made into trains and divided according to their destinations. Thus the cars must be shunted several times along their route in contrast to a unit train, which carries, for example, cars from the plant to a port, or coal from a mine to the power plant
[...More...]

"Hump Yard" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Goods Train
Rail freight transport
Rail freight transport
is the use of railroads and trains to transport cargo as opposed to human passengers. A freight train or goods train is a group of freight cars (US) or goods wagons (International Union of Railways) hauled by one or more locomotives on a railway, transporting cargo all or some of the way between the shipper and the intended destination as part of the logistics chain. Trains may haul bulk material, intermodal containers, general freight or specialized freight in purpose-designed cars.[1] Rail freight practices and economics vary by country and region. When considered in terms of ton-miles or tonne-kilometers hauled per unit of energy consumed, rail transport can be more efficient than other means of transportation. Maximum economies are typically realized with bulk commodities (e.g., coal), especially when hauled over long distances
[...More...]

"Goods Train" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Freight Yard
A rail yard, railway yard or railroad yard is a complex series of railroad tracks for storing, sorting, or loading and unloading, railroad cars and locomotives. Railroad yards have many tracks in parallel for keeping rolling stock stored off the mainline, so that they do not obstruct the flow of traffic. Railroad cars are moved around by specially designed yard switchers, a type of locomotive. Cars in a railroad yard may be sorted by numerous categories, including railroad company, loaded or unloaded, destination, car type, or whether they need repairs. Railroad yards are normally built where there is a need to store cars while they are not being loaded or unloaded, or are waiting to be assembled into trains. Large yards may have a tower to control operations.[1]:46 Many railway yards are located at strategic points on a main line. Main-line yards are often composed of an up yard and a down yard, linked to the associated railroad direction
[...More...]

"Freight Yard" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Austria
Coordinates: 47°20′N 13°20′E / 47.333°N 13.333°E / 47.333; 13.333 Republic
Republic
of Austria Republik Österreich  (German)FlagCoat of armsAnthem: Land der Berge, Land am Strome  (German) Land of Mountains, Land by the RiverLocation of  Austria  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)  –  [Legend]Capital and largest city Vienna 48°12′N 16°21′E / 48.200°N 16.350°E / 48.200; 16.350Off
[...More...]

"Austria" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Switzerland
Switzerland
Switzerland
(/ˈswɪtsərlənd/), officially the Swiss Confederation, is a federal republic in Europe. It consists of 26 cantons, and the city of Bern
Bern
is the seat of the federal authorities.[1][2][note 1] The country is situated in Western-Central Europe,[note 4] and is bordered by Italy
Italy
to the south, France
France
to the west, Germany
Germany
to the north, and Austria
Austria
and Liechtenstein
Liechtenstein
to the east. Switzerland
Switzerland
is a landlocked country geographically divided between the Alps, the Swiss Plateau and the Jura, spanning a total area of 41,285 km2 (15,940 sq mi) (land area 39,997 km2 (15,443 sq mi))
[...More...]

"Switzerland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Germany
Coordinates: 51°N 9°E / 51°N 9°E / 51; 9Federal Republic
Republic
of Germany Bundesrepublik Deutschland (German)[a]FlagCoat of armsMotto:  "Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit" (de facto) "Unity and Justice and Freedom"Anthem: "Deutschlandlied" (third verse only)[b] "Song of Germany"Location of  Germany  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)Location of
[...More...]

"Germany" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Linz
Linz
Linz
(/lɪnts/; German pronunciation: [ˈlɪnt͡s]; Czech: Linec) is the third-largest city of Austria
Austria
and capital of the state of Upper Austria
Austria
(German: Oberösterreich). It is in the north centre of Austria, approximately 30 kilometres (19 miles) south of the Czech border, on both sides of the River Danube. The population of the city is 200,839, and that of the Greater Linz
Linz
conurbation is about 271,000. In 2009 Linz, together with the Lithuanian capital Vilnius, was chosen as the European Capital of Culture. Since 1 December 2014 Linz
Linz
is a member of the UNESCO
UNESCO
Creative Cities (UCCN) network as a City of Media Arts
[...More...]

"Linz" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Narrow Gauge
North America · South America · Europe · Australiav t eA narrow-gauge railway (narrow-gauge railroad in the US) is a railway with a track gauge narrower than the standard 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 1⁄2 in). Most narrow-gauge railways are between 600 mm (1 ft 11 5⁄8 in) and 1,067 mm (3 ft 6 in). Since narrow-gauge railways are usually built with smaller radius curves, smaller structure gauges and lighter rails, they can be less-costly to build, equip and operate than standard- or broad-gauge railways (particularly in mountainous or difficult terrain). Lower-cost narrow-gauge railways are often built to serve industries and communities where the traffic potential would not justify the cost of a standard- or broad-gauge line. Narrow-gauge railways have specialized use in mines and other environments, where a small structure gauge necessitates a small loading gauge
[...More...]

"Narrow Gauge" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Railway Station
A train station, railway station, railroad station, or depot (see below) is a railway facility or area where trains regularly stop to load or unload passengers or freight. It generally consists of at least one track-side platform and a station building (depot) providing such ancillary services as ticket sales and waiting rooms. If a station is on a single-track line, it often has a passing loop to facilitate traffic movements. The smallest stations are most often referred to as "stops" or, in some parts of the world, as "halts" (flag stops). Stations may be at ground level, underground, or elevated
[...More...]

"Railway Station" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Branch Lines
A branch line is a secondary railway line which branches off a more important through route, usually a main line. A very short branch line may be called a spur line. David Blyth Hanna, the first president of the Canadian National Railway, said that although most branch lines cannot pay for themselves, they are essential to make main lines pay.[1][2]Contents1 United Kingdom 2 North America 3 Singapore 4 Hong Kong 5 New Zealand 6 ReferencesUnited Kingdom[edit] Many British branch lines were closed as a result of the "Beeching Axe" in the 1960s, although some have been re-opened as heritage railways. The smallest branch line that is still in operation in the UK is the Stourbridge Town Branch Line
Stourbridge Town Branch Line
from Stourbridge Junction going to Stourbridge Town
[...More...]

"Branch Lines" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Rostock
Rostock
Rostock
(German pronunciation: [ˈʁɔstɔk] ( listen)) is the largest city in the north German state Mecklenburg-Vorpommern. Rostock
Rostock
is on the Warnow
Warnow
river; the district of Warnemünde
Warnemünde
12 kilometres (7 miles) north of the city centre is directly on the Baltic Sea
Baltic Sea
coast. Rostock
Rostock
is home to one of the oldest universities in the world, the University of Rostock, founded in 1419. The city territory of Rostock
Rostock
stretches for about 20 km (12 mi) along the Warnow
Warnow
to the Baltic Sea. The largest built-up area of Rostock
Rostock
is on the western side of the river
[...More...]

"Rostock" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Liverpool And Manchester Railway
The Liverpool
Liverpool
and Manchester
Manchester
Railway[1][2][3] (L&MR) was a railway opened on 15 September 1830 between the Lancashire
Lancashire
towns of Liverpool and Manchester
Manchester
in England.[i] It was the first railway to rely exclusively on steam power, with no horse-drawn traffic permitted at any time; the first to be entirely double track throughout its length; the first to have a signalling system; the first to be fully timetabled; the first to be powered entirely by its own motive power; and the first to carry mail.[4] John B. Jervis
John B

[...More...]

"Liverpool And Manchester Railway" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.