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Golders Green Crematorium
Coordinates: 51°34′38″N 000°11′37″W / 51.57722°N 0.19361°W / 51.57722; -0.19361 ( Golders Green
Golders Green
Crematorium) Golders Green
Golders Green
Crematorium Golders Green
Golders Green
Crematorium and Mausoleum was the first crematorium to be opened in London, and one of the oldest crematoria in Britain.[1][2] The land for the crematorium was purchased in 1900, costing £6,000, and the crematorium was opened in 1902 by Sir Henry Thompson.[2] Golders Green
Golders Green
Crematorium, as it is usually called, is in Hoop Lane, off Finchley Road, Golders Green, London NW11, ten minutes' walk from Golders Green
Golders Green
tube station. It is directly opposite the Golders Green Jewish Cemetery ( Golders Green
Golders Green
is an area with a large Jewish population)
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Henry William Pickersgill
Henry William Pickersgill
Henry William Pickersgill
RA (3 December 1782 – 21 April 1875) was an English painter specialising in portraits. He was a Royal Academician for almost fifty years, and painted many of the most notable figures of his time.Contents1 Biography 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Born in London, Pickersgill was adopted in his youth by a Mr Hall, a silk manufacturer in Spitalfields,[1] who financed his schooling and then took him into the family business
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Angry Young Men
The "angry young men" were a group of mostly working- and middle-class British playwrights and novelists who became prominent in the 1950s. The group's leading figures included John Osborne
John Osborne
and Kingsley Amis. The phrase was originally coined by the Royal Court Theatre's press officer in order to promote Osborne's 1956 play Look Back in Anger
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Cream (band)
Cream were a 1960s British rock power trio consisting of drummer Ginger Baker, guitarist/singer Eric Clapton
Eric Clapton
and lead singer/bassist Jack Bruce
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Neville Cardus
Sir John Frederick Neville Cardus, CBE (3 April 1888 – 28 February 1975) was an English writer and critic. From an impoverished home background, and mainly self-educated, he became The Manchester Guardian's cricket correspondent in 1919 and its chief music critic in 1927, holding the two posts simultaneously until 1940. His contributions to these two distinct fields in the years before the Second World War established his reputation as one of the foremost critics of his generation. Cardus's approach to cricket writing was innovative, turning what had previously been largely a factual form into vivid description and criticism; he is considered by contemporaries to have influenced every subsequent cricket writer. Although he achieved his largest readership for his cricket reports and books, he considered music criticism as his principal vocation
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National Heritage List For England
The National Heritage List for England
England
(NHLE) is Historic England's official list of buildings, monuments, parks and gardens, wrecks, battlefields, World Heritage Sites
World Heritage Sites
and other heritage assets considered worthy of preservation. Properties on the list, or located within a conservation area, are protected from being altered or demolished without special permission from local government planning authorities. The passage of the Ancient Monuments Protection Act 1882
Ancient Monuments Protection Act 1882
established the first part of what the list is today, it established a list of 50 prehistoric monuments which were protected by the state. Further amendments to this act increased the levels of protection and added more monuments to the list. The Town and Country Planning Acts created the first listed buildings and the process for adding properties to it
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Listed Building
A listed building or listed structure is one that has been placed on one of the four statutory lists maintained by Historic England
Historic England
in England, Historic Environment Scotland
Historic Environment Scotland
in Scotland, Cadw
Cadw
in Wales, and the Northern Ireland Environment Agency in Northern Ireland. The term has also been used in Ireland, where buildings are surveyed for the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage
National Inventory of Architectural Heritage
in accordance with the country's obligations under the Granada Convention. However, the preferred term in Ireland is protected structure.[1] A listed building may not be demolished, extended, or altered without special permission from the local planning authority, which typically consults the relevant central government agency, particularly for significant alterations to the more notable listed buildings
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Cremation
Cremation
Cremation
is the combustion, vaporization and oxidation of cadavers to basic chemical compounds, such as gases, ashes and mineral fragments retaining the appearance of dry bone.[1] Cremation
Cremation
may serve as a funeral or post-funeral rite as an alternative to the interment of an intact dead body in a coffin or casket. Cremated remains (aka "cremains" or simply, "ashes"),[2][3] which do not constitute a health risk, may be buried or interred in memorial sites or cemeteries, or they may be retained by relatives and dispersed in various ways. Cremation
Cremation
is an alternative in place of burial or other forms of disposal in funeral practices. Some families prefer to have the deceased present at the funeral with cremation to follow; others prefer that the cremation occur prior to the funeral or memorial service. In many countries, cremation is usually done in a crematorium
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Nativity Scene
In the Christian tradition, a nativity scene (also known as a manger scene, crib, crèche (/krɛʃ/or /kreɪʃ/, or in Italian presepio or presepe) is the special exhibition, particularly during the Christmas season, of art objects representing the birth of Jesus.[1] While the term "nativity scene" may be used of any representation of the very common subject of the Nativity of Jesus
Nativity of Jesus
in art, it has a more specialized sense referring to seasonal displays, either using model figures in a setting or reenactments called "living nativity scenes" (tableau vivant) in which real humans and animals participate. Nativity scenes exhibit figures representing the infant Jesus, his mother, Mary, and her husband, Joseph. Other characters from the nativity story, such as shepherds, sheep, and angels may be displayed near the manger in a barn (or cave) intended to accommodate farm animals, as described in the Gospel of Luke
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Christmas Tree
A Christmas
Christmas
tree is a decorated tree, usually an evergreen conifer such as spruce, pine, or fir or an artificial tree of similar appearance, associated with the celebration of Christmas. The modern Christmas
Christmas
tree was developed in medieval Livonia
Livonia
(present-day Estonia and Latvia) and early modern Germany, where Protestant Germans brought decorated trees into their homes.[1][2] It acquired popularity beyond the Lutheran
Lutheran
areas of Germany[1][3] and the Baltic countries
Baltic countries
during the second half of the 19th century, at first among the upper classes.[4] The tree was traditionally decorated with "roses made of colored paper, apples, wafers, tinsel, [and] sweetmeats"
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Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
(CWGC) is an intergovernmental organisation of six independent member states whose principal function is to mark, record and maintain the graves and places of commemoration of Commonwealth of Nations
Commonwealth of Nations
military service members who died in the two World Wars. The Commission is also responsible for commemorating Commonwealth civilians who died as a result of enemy action during World War II.[1] The Commission was founded by Fabian Ware
Fabian Ware
and constituted through Royal Charter
Royal Charter
in 1917 named the Imperial War Graves Commission.[1] The change to the present name took place in 1960.[2] The Commission, as part of its mandate, is responsible for commemorating all Commonwealth war dead individually and equally
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Victoria Cross
The Victoria Cross
Victoria Cross
(VC) is the highest award of the United Kingdom honours system. It is awarded for gallantry "in the presence of the enemy" to members of the British armed forces. It may be awarded posthumously. It was previously awarded to Commonwealth countries, most of which have established their own honours systems and no longer recommend British honours. It may be awarded to a person of any military rank in any service and to civilians under military command although no civilian has received the award since 1879. Since the first awards were presented by Queen Victoria
Queen Victoria
in 1857, two thirds of all awards have been personally presented by the British monarch. These investitures are usually held at Buckingham Palace. The VC was introduced on 29 January 1856 by Queen Victoria
Queen Victoria
to honour acts of valour during the Crimean War
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Crocus
Crocus
Crocus
(English plural: crocuses or croci) is a genus of flowering plants in the iris family comprising 90 species of perennials growing from corms. Many are cultivated for their flowers appearing in autumn, winter, or spring. The spice saffron is obtained from the stigmas of Crocus
Crocus
sativus, an autumn-blooming species
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Italianate Architecture
The Italianate style of architecture was a distinct 19th-century phase in the history of Classical architecture. In the Italianate style, the models and architectural vocabulary of 16th-century Italian Renaissance
Renaissance
architecture, which had served as inspiration for both Palladianism
Palladianism
and Neoclassicism, were synthesised with picturesque aesthetics. The style of architecture that was thus created, though also characterised as "Neo-Renaissance", was essentially of its own time. "The backward look transforms its object," Siegfried Giedion wrote of historicist architectural styles;[2] "every spectator at every period—at every moment, indeed—inevitably transforms the past according to his own nature." The Italianate style was first developed in Britain about 1802 by John Nash, with the construction of Cronkhill
Cronkhill
in Shropshire
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Communist Party Of Great Britain
Democratic Left[3][4]Communist Party of BritainMembership60,000 (peak; 1945)[5] 4,742 (dissolution; 1991)[6]IdeologyCommunism Marxism–LeninismPolitical position Far-leftInternational affiliation CominternColours           Red
Red
and YellowPolitics of United Kingdom Political parties ElectionsThe Communist Party of Great Britain
Communist Party of Great Britain
(CPGB) was a British communist party which was the largest communist party in Great Britain, although it never became a mass party like those in France and Italy. It existed from 1920 to 1991. Founded in 1920 by the merger of several smaller Marxist
Marxist
parties, the party gained the support of many socialist organisations and worker's committees during the period after World War I
World War I
and the Russian October Revolution
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