HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Gojri
Gujari, also known as Gojri (ગુજરી, गुजरी, گوجری‬) is a variety of Indo-Aryan spoken by the Gurjars and other tribes of India
India
, Pakistan
Pakistan
and also found in Afghanistan.[3][4] The language is mainly spoken in Rajasthan, Gujarat, Jammu and Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh, Haryana, Uttarakhand, Punjab, and many other parts of India. The language is also spoken by Gujjars of Pakistan
Pakistan
in all the provinces of Pakistan
Pakistan
including Azad Jammu & Kashmir
Kashmir
and Hazara region. In Pakistan
Pakistan
there are a number of organisation institution are working for the development of Gojri inludin a news channel in Gujri. Many Gujari words originate from Rajasthan
Rajasthan
where Gurjars lives
[...More...]

"Gojri" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gujarati Language
Gujarati (/ɡʊdʒəˈrɑːti/;[5] ગુજરાતી gujarātī [ɡudʒəˈɾɑːt̪i]) is an Indo-Aryan language native to the Indian state of Gujarat. It is part of the greater Indo-European language family. Gujarati is descended from Old Gujarati
Old Gujarati
(circa 1100–1500 AD). In India, it is the official language in the state of Gujarat, as well as an official language in the union territories of Daman and Diu
Daman and Diu
and Dadra and Nagar Haveli
[...More...]

"Gujarati Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Gujari Raga
Gurjari is an Indian classical music raga. Raga Gurjari is named after Gujarat, India.[1] Origin[edit] The present day Gurjari raga owes its origin to the Gurjars (or Gujjars).[2] References[edit]^ Delvoye, Françoise (2013). New Developments in Asian Studies. Routledge. p. 344. ISBN 9781136174704.  ^ O. Gosvami (1978). The story of Indian music: its growth and synthesis. Scholarly Press. p. 72. ISBN 0403015677, ISBN 978-0-403-01567-2. This article about the music of India is a stub
[...More...]

"Gujari Raga" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Delhi
Delhi
Delhi
(/ˈdɛli/, Hindustani pronunciation: [d̪ɪlliː] Dilli), officially the National Capital Territory of Delhi
National Capital Territory of Delhi
(NCT), is a city and a union territory of India.[16][17] It is bordered by Haryana
Haryana
on three sides and by Uttar Pradesh
Uttar Pradesh
to the east. The NCT covers an area of 1,484 square kilometres (573 sq mi)
[...More...]

"Delhi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Uttar Pradesh
24 January 1950[1]Capital LucknowDistricts 75[2][3]Government • Body Government of Uttar Pradesh • Governor Ram Naik[4] • Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath
Yogi Adityanath
(BJP) • Deputy Chief Ministers Keshav Prasad Maurya
Keshav Prasad Maurya
(BJP) Dinesh Sharma (BJP) • Chief Secretary Rajive Kumar, IAS[5] • Director General of Police O. P
[...More...]

"Uttar Pradesh" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Madhya Pradesh
Madhya Pradesh[6] (MP; /ˈmʌdjə prəˈdɛʃ/ ( listen); meaning Central Province) is a state in central India. Its capital is Bhopal
Bhopal
and the largest city is Indore
Indore
with Jabalpur, Gwalior, and Ujjain
Ujjain
being the other major cities. Nicknamed the "Heart of India" due to its geographical location in India, Madhya Pradesh
Madhya Pradesh
is the second-largest state in the country by area. With over 75 million inhabitants, it is the fifth-largest state in India
India
by population. It borders the states of Uttar Pradesh
Uttar Pradesh
to the northeast, Chhattisgarh
Chhattisgarh
to the southeast, Maharashtra
Maharashtra
to the south, Gujarat
Gujarat
to the west, and Rajasthan
Rajasthan
to the northwest. Its total area is 308,252 km2
[...More...]

"Madhya Pradesh" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Mian Bashir Ahmed
Bashir or Basheer (Arabic: بشير‎) is a male given name. Derived from Arabic, it means "the one who brings good news"
[...More...]

"Mian Bashir Ahmed" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ethnologue
Ethnologue: Languages of the World is an annual reference publication in print and online that provides statistics and other information on the living languages of the world. It was first issued in 1951, and is now published annually by SIL International, a U.S.-based, worldwide, Christian non-profit organization
[...More...]

"Ethnologue" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Lambadi Language
Lambani or Goar-boali, also called Banjari, is a language spoken by the once nomadic Banjara
Banjara
people across India
India
and it belongs to Indo-Aryan group of languages. The language does not have a native script.[4] The language is known by various other names, including Lamani, Lamadi, Lambani, Labhani, Lambara, Lavani, Lemadi, Lumadale, Labhani Muka and variants, Banjara, Banjari, Bangala, Banjori, Banjuri, Brinjari, and variants, Gohar-Herkeri, Goola, Gurmarti, Gormati, Kora, Singali, Sugali, Sukali, Tanda
[...More...]

"Lambadi Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Uttarakhand
Uttarakhand
Uttarakhand
(English: /ˌʊtəˈrɑːkʌnd/),[5] officially the State of Uttarakhand
Uttarakhand
(Uttarākhaṇḍ Rājya), formerly known as Uttaranchal,[6] is a state in the northern part of India. It is often referred to as the Devbhumi (literally "Land of the Gods")[7] due to many Hindu
Hindu
temples and pilgrimage centres found throughout the state. Uttarakhand
Uttarakhand
is known for the natural environment of the Himalayas, the Bhabhar and the Terai. On 9 November 2000, Uttarakhand
Uttarakhand
became the 27th state of the Republic of India, being created from the Himalayan and adjoining northwestern districts of Uttar Pradesh.[8] It borders Tibet to the north; the Province No. 7
Province No

[...More...]

"Uttarakhand" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Mewati
Mewati is an Indo-Aryan language spoken by about three million speakers in the Mewat Region (Alwar and Bharatpur, districts of Rajasthan, Nuh district
Nuh district
of Haryana).Mewati is incorporated form of Meenawati.[4] Mewati dialect distinctly characterizes the Meo culture.[5] There are 9 vowels, 31 consonants, and two diphthongs. Suprasegmentals are not so prominent as they are in the other dialects of Rajasthani. There are two numbers—singular and plural, two genders—masculine and feminine; and three cases—direct, oblique, and vocative. The nouns decline according to their final segments. Case marking
Case marking
is postpositional. Pronouns are traditional in nature and are inflected for number and case. Gender is not distinguished in pronouns. There are two types of adjectives. There are three tenses: past, present, and future
[...More...]

"Mewati" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Marwari Language
Marwari (Mārwāṛī; also rendered Marwadi, Marvadi) is a Rajasthani language spoken in the Indian state of Rajasthan. Marwari is also found in the neighboring state of Gujarat
Gujarat
and Haryana, Eastern Pakistan
Pakistan
and some migrant communities in himalayan country Nepal. With some 20 million or so speakers (ce. 2001), it is one of the largest varieties of Rajasthani. Most speakers live in Rajasthan, with a quarter million in Sindh
Sindh
and a tenth that number in Nepal. There are two dozen dialects of Marwari. Marwari is popularly written in Devanagari
Devanagari
script, as is Hindi, Marathi, Nepali and Sanskrit; although it was historically written in Mahajani. Marwari currently has no official status as a language of education and government. There has been a push in the recent past for the national government to recognize this language and give it a scheduled status
[...More...]

"Marwari Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Godwari Dialect
Godwari is a dialect of Marwari spoken in Godwar.[3] References[edit]^ Godwar at Ethnologue
Ethnologue
(18th ed., 2015) ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Godwari". Glottolog
Glottolog
3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.  ^ Godwari1
[...More...]

"Godwari Dialect" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Mewari Language
Mewari is one of the major dialects of Rajasthani language
Rajasthani language
of Indo-Aryan languages
Indo-Aryan languages
family. It is spoken by about five million speakers in Rajsamand, Bhilwara, Udaipur, and Chittorgarh
Chittorgarh
districts of Rajasthan
Rajasthan
state of India. It has SOV word order. There are 31 consonants, 10 vowels, and 2 diphthongs in Mewari. Intonation is prominent. Dental fricative
Dental fricative
is replaced by glottal stop at initial and medial positions. Inflection
Inflection
and derivation are the forms of word formation. There are two numbers—singular and plural, two genders—masculine and feminine, and three cases—simple, oblique, and vocative. Case marking
Case marking
is partly inflectional and partly postpositional
[...More...]

"Mewari Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.