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Gnome Wave Cleaner
Gnome Wave Cleaner (GWC) is a digital audio editor application. The graphical user interface for the editor has been produced employing GTK+
GTK+
for the GUI widgets. Its primary author is Jeff Welty. Gnome Wave Cleaner is free and open-source software subject to the terms of the GNU General Public License
GNU General Public License
version 2 or later. Features[edit] Gnome Wave Cleaner's primary purpose is to clean up poor quality recordings, such as those captured from old 78 rpm phonograph records. It provides tools for removing noise by spectral subtraction and for removing clicks by least squares autoregressive interpolation. It is also capable of automatically marking song boundaries, and developing TOC records for creating music Compact Discs from the cleaned audio file
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Software Developer
A software developer is a person concerned with facets of the software development process, including the research, design, programming, and testing of computer software. Other job titles which are often used with similar meanings are programmer, software analyst, and software engineer. According to developer Eric Sink, the differences between system design, software development, and programming are more apparent. Already in the current market place there can be found a segregation between programmers and developers, being that one who implements is not the same as the one who designs the class structure or hierarchy. Even more so that developers become software architects or systems architects, those who design the multi-leveled architecture or component interactions of a large software system.[1] In a large company, there may be employees whose sole responsibility consists of only one of the phases above
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Colors Of Noise
In audio engineering, electronics, physics, and many other fields, the color of noise refers to the power spectrum of a noise signal (a signal produced by a stochastic process). Different colors of noise have significantly different properties: for example, as audio signals they will sound different to human ears, and as images they will have a visibly different texture. Therefore, each application typically requires noise of a specific color. This sense of 'color' for noise signals is similar to the concept of timbre in music (which is also called "tone color"[citation needed]); however the latter is almost always used for sound, and may consider very detailed features of the spectrum. The practice of naming kinds of noise after colors started with white noise, a signal whose spectrum has equal power within any equal interval of frequencies
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SoX
Sound eXchange (SoX) is a cross-platform audio editing software. It has a command-line interface, and is written in standard C. It is free software, licensed under the GNU General Public License
GNU General Public License
version 2, with libsox licensed under GNU Lesser General Public License
GNU Lesser General Public License
version 2, and distributed by Chris Bagwell through SourceForge.net.Contents1 History 2 Features 3 Examples 4 See also 5 External linksHistory[edit] SoX
SoX
was created in July 1991 by Lance Norskog and posted to the Usenet group alt.sources as Aural eXchange: Sound sample translator. With the second release (in November the same year) it was renamed Sound Exchange
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Muse
The Muses
Muses
(/ˈmjuːzɪz/; Ancient Greek: Μοῦσαι, Moũsai) are the inspirational goddesses of literature, science, and the arts in Greek mythology. They were considered the source of the knowledge embodied in the poetry, lyric songs, and myths that were related orally for centuries in these ancient cultures
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Software Release Life Cycle
A software release life cycle is the sum of the stages of development and maturity for a piece of computer software: ranging from its initial development to its eventual release, and including updated versions of the released version to help improve software or fix software bugs still present in the software.Contents1 History 2 Stages of development2.1 Pre-alpha 2.2 Alpha 2.3 Beta2.3.1 Open and closed beta2.4 Release candidate3 Release3.1 Release to manufacturing (RTM) 3.2 General availability (GA) 3.3 Release to web (RTW)4 Support4.1 End-of-life5 See also 6 References 7 BibliographyHistory[edit] Usage of the "alpha/beta" test terminology originated at IBM. As long ago as the 1950s (and probably earlier), IBM used similar terminology for their hardware development. "A" test was the verification of a new product before public announcement. "B" test was the verification before releasing the product to be manufactured
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Diamond Cut Audio Restoration Tools
Diamond Cut Audio Restoration Tools
Diamond Cut Audio Restoration Tools
(also known as DC-Art) is a set of digital audio editor tools from Diamond Cut Productions used for audio restoration, record restoration, sound restoration of gramophone records and other audio containing media.Contents1 Origins[1] 2 Versions2.1 DC-Art 2.2 DC-Art-32 2.3 DC-Art Millennium 2.4 DC-Enhance/MP3 2.5 DC-Audio Mentor 2.6 DC-5 2.7 DC-6 2.8 AFDF/VVA VST plugin 2.9 DC-7 2.10 DC7.5 2.11 DC-83 See also 4 References 5 External linksOrigins[1][edit] Diamond Cut Audio Restoration Tools
Diamond Cut Audio Restoration Tools
(DC-Art) was originally a private venture by R&D engineer Craig Maier and software engineer Rick Carlson
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Optical Disc Authoring
Optical disc
Optical disc
authoring, including DVD
DVD
and Blu-ray
Blu-ray
Disc authoring is the process of assembling source material—video, audio or other data—into the proper logical volume format to then be recorded ("burned") onto an optical disc (typically a compact disc or DVD).Contents1 Process 2 Sessions2.1 Tracks3 Hardware 4 Software 5 File
File
systems5.1 ISO 9660 5.2 Universal Disk Format6 HighMAT 7 See also 8 External linksProcess[edit] To burn an optical disc, one usually first creates an optical disc image with a full file system, of a type designed for the optical disc, in temporary storage such as a file in another file system on a disk drive
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Autoregressive
In statistics and signal processing, an autoregressive (AR) model is a representation of a type of random process; as such, it is used to describe certain time-varying processes in nature, economics, etc
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Least Squares
The method of least squares is a standard approach in regression analysis to approximate the solution of overdetermined systems, i.e., sets of equations in which there are more equations than unknowns. "Least squares" means that the overall solution minimizes the sum of the squares of the residuals made in the results of every single equation. The most important application is in data fitting. The best fit in the least-squares sense minimizes the sum of squared residuals (a residual being: the difference between an observed value, and the fitted value provided by a model)
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Spectral Density
The power spectrum S x x ( f ) displaystyle S_ xx (f) of a time series x ( t ) displaystyle x(t) describes the distribution of power into frequency components composing that signal.[1] According to Fourier analysis
Fourier analysis
any physical signal can be decomposed into a number of discrete frequencies, or a spectrum of frequencies over a continuous range. The statistical average of a certain signal or sort of signal (including noise) as analyzed in terms of its frequency content, is called its spectrum. When the energy of the signal is concentrated around a finite time interval, especially if its total energy is finite, one may compute the energy spectral density
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Proprietary Software
Proprietary software is non-free computer software for which the software's publisher or another person retains intellectual property rights—usually copyright of the source code,[1] but sometimes patent rights.[2]Contents1 Software becoming proprietary 2 Legal basis2.1 Limitations3 Exclusive rights3.1 Use of the software 3.2 Inspection and modification of source code 3.3 Redistribution4 Interoperability with software and hardware4.1 Proprietary file formats and protocols 4.2 Proprietary APIs 4.3 Vendor lock-in 4.4 Software limited to certain hardware configurations5 Abandonment by owners 6 Formerly open-source software 7 Pricing and economics 8 Examples 9 See also 10 ReferencesSoftware becoming proprietary[edit] Until the late 1960s computers—large and expensive mainframe co
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Free And Open-source Software
Free and open-source software
Free and open-source software
(FOSS) is software that can be classified as both free software and open-source software.[a] That is, anyone is freely licensed to use, copy, study, and change the software in any way, and the source code is openly shared so that people are encouraged to voluntarily improve the design of the software.[3] This is in contrast to proprietary software, where the software is under restrictive copyright and the source code is usually hidden from the users. The benefits of using FOSS can include decreased software costs, increased security and stability (especially in regard to malware), protecting privacy, education, and giving users more control over their own hardware. Free, open-source operating systems such as Linux and descendants of BSD
BSD
are widely utilized today, powering millions of servers, desktops, smartphones (e.g
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Linux
Linux
Linux
(/ˈlɪnəks/ ( listen) LIN-əks)[9][10] is a family of free and open-source software operating systems built around the Linux
Linux
kernel. Typically, Linux
Linux
is packaged in a form known as a Linux distribution (or distro for short) for both desktop and server use. The defining component of a Linux distribution
Linux distribution
is the Linux kernel,[11] an operating system kernel first released on September 17, 1991, by Linus Torvalds.[12][13][14] Many Linux
Linux
distributions use the word "Linux" in their name
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GTK+
GTK+
GTK+
(formerly GIMP
GIMP
Toolkit) is a cross-platform widget toolkit for creating graphical user interfaces.[2] It is licensed under the terms of the GNU
GNU
Lesser General Public License, allowing both free and proprietary software to use it
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Graphical User Interface
The graphical user interface (GUI /ɡuːiː/), is a type of user interface that allows users to interact with electronic devices through graphical icons and visual indicators such as secondary notation, instead of text-based user interfaces, typed command labels or text navigation. GUIs were introduced in reaction to the perceived steep learning curve of command-line interfaces (CLIs),[1][2][3] which require commands to be typed on a computer keyboard. The actions in a GUI are usually performed through direct manipulation of the graphical elements.[4] Beyond computers, GUIs are used in many handheld mobile devices such as MP3
MP3
players, portable media players, gaming devices, smartphones and smaller household, office and industrial controls
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