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Glass Flowers
The Ware Collection of Blaschka Glass
Glass
Models of Plants (or simply the Glass
Glass
Flowers) is a collection of highly realistic glass botanical models at the Harvard Museum of Natural History
Harvard Museum of Natural History
in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Created by Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka
Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka
from 1887 through 1936 at their studio in Hosterwitz, near Dresden, Germany, the collection was commissioned by George Lincoln Goodale, the first director of Harvard's Botanical Museum, and was financed by Mary Lee Ware
Mary Lee Ware
and her mother Elizabeth C. Ware.[1] It includes 847 life-size models (representing 780 species and varieties of plants in 164 families) and some 3,000 detail models such as of plant parts and anatomical sections
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Cashew
The cashew tree ( Anacardium
Anacardium
occidentale) is a tropical evergreen tree that produces the cashew seed and the cashew apple.[1] It can grow as high as 14 m (46 ft), but the dwarf cashew, growing up to 6 m (20 ft), has proved more profitable, with earlier maturity and higher yields. The species is originally native to northeastern Brazil.[1] Portuguese colonists in Brazil
Brazil
began exporting cashew nuts as early as the 1550s.[2] Major production of cashews occurs in Vietnam, Nigeria, India, and Ivory Coast.[3] The cashew nut, often simply called a cashew, is widely consumed. It is eaten on its own, used in recipes, or processed into cashew cheese or cashew butter
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Lampworking
Lampworking
Lampworking
is a type of glasswork where a torch or lamp is primarily used to melt the glass. Once in a molten state, the glass is formed by blowing and shaping with tools and hand movements. It is also known as flameworking or torchworking, as the modern practice no longer uses oil-fueled lamps. Although lack of a precise definition for lampworking makes it difficult to determine when this technique was first developed, the earliest verifiable lampworked glass is probably a collection of beads thought to date to the fifth century BC.[1] Lampworking
Lampworking
became widely practiced in Murano, Italy
Italy
in the 14th century. In the mid 19th century lampwork technique was extended to the production of paperweights, primarily in France, where it became a popular art form, still collected today
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Michael D. Smith (computer Scientist)
Michael D. Smith is the Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University. He is also the John H. Finley, Jr. Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. In addition to his academic position, Smith was the Chief Scientist and co-founder of Liquid Machines, Inc., a provider of enterprise rights management software.[2][3][4] Education[edit] Smith received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 1993, his master of science degree from Worcester Polytechnic Institute in 1985, and his bachelor of science in electrical engineering and computer science from Princeton University in June 1983. Response to Graduate Student Unionization[edit] On November 16 and 17, 2016, teaching and research assistants at Harvard University
Harvard University
voted in an election to decide whether they wanted to be represented by a labor union
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Rakesh Khurana
Rakesh Khurana
Rakesh Khurana
(born November 22, 1967) is an American educator. He is Professor of Sociology in Harvard's Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Professor of Leadership Development at the Harvard Business School, co-Faculty Dean of Cabot House
Cabot House
and Dean of Harvard College.[1][2]Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career2.1 Dean of Harvard College3 References 4 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Khurana was born in India
India
and was raised in Queens, New York.[3] He received his bachelor's degree in Industrial Relations
Industrial Relations
from Cornell University,[1] his A.M
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List Of Harvard College Freshman Dormitories
A freshman, first year, or frosh, is a person in the first year at an educational institution, usually a secondary or post-secondary school.Contents1 Arab countries 2 Australia and New Zealand 3 Belgium 4 Brazil 5 Chile 6 Colombia 7 Denmark 8 England and Wales 9 Estonia 10 France 11 Germany 12 India 13 Italy 14 Lebanon 15 Netherlands 16 Peru 17 Portugal 18 Russia and former Soviet Union 19 Scotland 20 United States 21 See also 22 References 23 External linksArab countries[edit] In the Gulf Council
Gulf Council
countries (GCC), a freshman is called Mustajid (مُستجد), which means one who is new to something
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Glass
Glass
Glass
is a non-crystalline amorphous solid that is often transparent and has widespread practical, technological, and decorative usage in, for example, window panes, tableware, and optoelectronics. The most familiar, and historically the oldest, types of glass are "silicate glasses" based on the chemical compound silica (silicon dioxide, or quartz), the primary constituent of sand. The term glass, in popular usage, is often used to refer only to this type of material, which is familiar from use as window glass and in glass bottles
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
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Glassblowing
Glassblowing
Glassblowing
is a glassforming technique that involves inflating molten glass into a bubble (or parison), with the aid of a blowpipe (or blow tube). A person who blows glass is called a glassblower, glassmith, or gaffer
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Marianne Moore
Marianne Craig Moore (November 15, 1887 – February 5, 1972) was an American Modernist poet, critic, translator, and editor. Her poetry is noted for formal innovation, precise diction, irony, and wit.Contents1 Early life 2 Poetic career 3 Poetic style 4 Selected works 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Moore was born in Kirkwood, Missouri, in the manse of the Presbyterian church where her maternal grandfather, John Riddle Warner, served as pastor. Her parents separated before she was born after her father, John Milton Moore, a mechanical engineer and inventor, suffered a psychotic episode; Moore never met him. She and her older brother, John Warner Moore, were reared by their mother, Mary Warner Moore
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National Book Award
The National Book Awards are a set of annual U.S. literary awards.[1][2] At the final National Book Awards Ceremony every November, the National Book Foundation presents the National Book Awards and two lifetime achievement awards to authors. The National Book Awards were established in 1936 by the American Booksellers Association,[3][4] abandoned during World War II, and re-established by three book industry organizations in 1950. Non-U.S. authors and publishers were eligible for the pre-war awards. Now they are presented to U.S
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Harvard Faculty Of Arts And Sciences
Science
Science
(from Latin scientia, meaning "knowledge")[2][3]:58 is a systematic enterprise that builds and organizes knowledge in the form of testable explanations and predictions about the universe.[a] Contemporary science is typically subdivided into the natural sciences which study the material world, the social sciences which study people and societies, and the formal sciences like mathematics
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New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as the NYT and NYTimes) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[5][6][7] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 127 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[8][9] The Times
The Times
is ranked 18th in the world by circulation and 3rd in the U.S.[10] The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded and is controlled by the Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[11] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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Mark Doty
Mark Doty
Mark Doty
(born August 10, 1953) is an American poet and memoirist. He was the winner of the National Book Award for Poetry in 2008.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Personal life 4 Awards 5 Works5.1 Poetry 5.2 Memoir 5.3 Edited 5.4 Essays 5.5 Live performance 5.6 Audiotapes 5.7 Videotapes6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Mark Doty
Mark Doty
was born in Maryville, Tennessee
Maryville, Tennessee
to Lawrence and Ruth Doty, with an older sister, Sarah Alice Doty. He earned a Bachelor of Arts from Drake University
Drake University
in Des Moines, Iowa, and received his Master of Fine Arts in creative writing from Goddard College
Goddard College
in Plainfield, Vermont.[2] Career[edit] Doty's first collection of poems, Turtle, Swan, was published by David R
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Alan M. Garber
Alan Michael Garber (born 1955) is an American academic administrator. He is the Provost of Harvard University.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Controversy about Graduate Student Unionization 4 Personal life 5 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Alan Garber was born in 1955.[citation needed] He graduated from Harvard University
Harvard University
in 1977.[1][2] He earned a PhD in Economics from
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