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Girton College, Cambridge
Girton College is one of the 31 constituent colleges of the University of Cambridge. The college was established in 1869 by Emily Davies, Barbara Bodichon
Barbara Bodichon
and Lady Stanley of Alderley as a college for women. Girton was granted full college status by the university in 1948, marking the official admittance of women to the university. In 1976, Girton was Cambridge university's first women's college to become coeducational. The main college site, situated on the outskirts of the village of Girton, about 2.5 miles (4 km) northwest of the university town, comprises 33 acres (13.4 ha) of land. Held in typical Victorian red brick design, most was built by architect Alfred Waterhouse between 1872 and 1887. It provides extensive sports facilities, an indoor swimming pool, an award-winning library and a chapel with two organs
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Fellow
A fellow is a member of a group (or fellowship) that work together in pursuing mutual knowledge or practice.[1] There are many different kinds of fellowships which are awarded for different reasons in academia and industry, often indicating an advanced level of scholarship.Contents1 Education and academia1.1 Research fellowships 1.2 Teaching fellowships 1.3 Fellowships as a prize or honor 1.4 Ancient university fellowships 1.5 Medical fellowships2 Industry and corporate fellowships2.1 Fellowships in commercial organizations 2.2 Nonprofit and government fellowships3 ReferencesEducation and academia[edit] In education and academia there are several kinds of fellowships, awarded for different reasons: Research fellowships[edit] Main article: Research fellow The title of research fellow is used to denote an academic research position at a university or a similar institution and is roughly equivalent to the title of lecturer in the teaching c
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Royal Society Of Portrait Painters
The Royal Society of Portrait Painters
Royal Society of Portrait Painters
(RP) is an art society based at Carlton House Terrace, SW1, London. The Society is a registered charity run by its members to promote, the creation, enjoyment and appreciation of portraiture through its annual exhibition, education and debate. The Society is a member of the Federation of British Artists and a registered charity.Contents1 History 2 Activities2.1 The Annual Exhibition3 Collections3.1 The People's Portrait Collection4 Membership4.1 Members5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The Royal Society of Portrait Painters
Royal Society of Portrait Painters
was founded in 1891 by 24 artists who were dissatisfied with the selection policies of the Royal Academy for its annual exhibition in London. They formed themselves, as the Society of Portrait Painters, into a new body to be concerned solely with portrait painting
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University Of Roehampton
The University of Roehampton, formerly Roehampton
Roehampton
Institute of Higher Education, is a public university in the United Kingdom, situated on three major sites in Roehampton, south-west London.Contents1 History 2 Facilities2.1 Specialist teaching facilities 2.2 Library 2.3 Sports 2.4 Accommodation 2.5 Transport3 Academic departments 4 Reputation and standing 5 Roehampton
Roehampton
Students' Union (RSU) 6 Notable alumni 7 Panorama 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] The university has its roots in the traditions of its four constituent colleges, all of which were founded in the 19th century as teacher training colleges: Whitelands College
Whitelands College
– Founded in 1841, the college is one of the five oldest institutions for training educators in England. A flagship women's college of the Church of England, it was the first college of higher education in the UK to admit women
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Whitelands College
Whitelands College
Whitelands College
is the oldest of the four constituent colleges of the University of Roehampton.Contents1 History 2 Festivals2.1 St Ursula 2.2 May Day3 Current facilities 4 University status 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit]Parkstead House, Roehampton, London Whitelands College
Whitelands College
is one of the five oldest higher education institutions in England (predating every university except Oxford, Cambridge, London and Durham) and was founded in 1841 by the Church of England's National Society as a teacher training college for women. A flagship women's college of the Church of England, it was the first college of higher education in the UK to admit women
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England
England
England
is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[6][7][8] It shares land borders with Scotland
Scotland
to the north and Wales
Wales
to the west. The Irish Sea
Irish Sea
lies northwest of England
England
and the Celtic Sea
Celtic Sea
lies to the southwest. England
England
is separated from continental Europe
Europe
by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel
English Channel
to the south
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Hitchin
Hitchin
Hitchin
(/ˈhɪtʃɪn/) is a market town in the North Hertfordshire District in Hertfordshire, England, with an estimated population of 33,350.[1]Contents1 History 2 Government 3 Transport 4 Education 5 Culture and community 6 Sport in Hitchin 7 Districts of Hitchin 8 Nearby settlements 9 Notable people who have lived in Hitchin 10 Filmography 11 Miscellaneous 12 References 13 External linksHistory[edit] Hitchin
Hitchin
is first noted as the central place of the Hicce people, a tribe holding 300 hides of land as mentioned in a 7th-century document,[2] the Tribal Hidage
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Honours Degree
The term "honours degree" (or "honors degree") has various meanings in the context of different degrees and education systems
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Englishwoman's Review
The Englishwoman's Review was a feminist periodical published in England between 1866 and 1910. Until 1869 called in full The Englishwoman's Review: a journal of woman's work, in 1870 (after a break in publication) it was renamed The Englishwoman's Review of Social and Industrial Questions.[1] One of the first feminist journals, The Englishwoman's Review was a product of the early women's movement. Its first editor was Jessie Boucherett, who saw it as the successor to the English Woman's Journal (1858–64).[2] Her successor, Helen Blackburn, was a long-time editor, 1880–90, and joint editor, 1890–95.[3] Contributors[edit]Amelia Sarah Levetus[4] Ethel Rolt Wheeler Lady Margaret SackvilleNotes[edit]^ 19th Century UK Periodicals Online: Series 1 – New Readerships at galeuk.com (Retrieved 23 March 2008) ^ pp. 103–125 of Burdens of History: British Feminists, Indian Women, and Imperial Culture online at books.google.co.uk (accessed 23 March 2008) ^ Walker, Linda
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Lent Term
Lent
Lent
term named for Lent, the 6-week fasting period before Easter, is the name of the winter academic term at the following British universities:University of Cambridge King's College London London School of Economics and Political Science University of Kent Exeter University University of Lancaster University of Wales, Lampeter University of Wales, Aberystwyth Canterbury Christ Church University University of Liverpool Swansea University Heythrop College, University of Londonand was the name of the autumn term at the University of Sydney
University of Sydney
before it swapped over to the two semester system in 1989. The term runs from January to March and thus corresponds to Hilary term at Oxford and Dublin, and Epiphany term at Durham
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Classical Tripos
The Classical Tripos is the taught course in classics at the Faculty of Classics, University of Cambridge. It is equivalent to Literae Humaniores at Oxford. It is traditionally a three-year degree, but for those who have not studied Latin
Latin
and Greek at school a four-year course has been introduced
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Sarah Woodhead
Sarah Woodhead (1851–1912) was the first woman to sit and pass a Tripos examination at Cambridge University. [1] She studied at the first women's college to be founded at either Oxford or Cambridge, i.e. Girton College - but before it was built, so attended courses set up by its founder, Emily Davies, in Benslow House, Hitchin. Woodhead's father was a Manchester grocer. The family had long belonged to the Society of Friends and Sarah was educated at Ackworth School, a Quaker school which had offered an education to the daughters of Friends as well as their sons for over eighty years before she became a scholar there. [2] Her mother's father, Joseph Cranstone, with whose family she lived prior to moving to Hitchin, was a prominent member of the Hemel Hemstead Society of Friends. In 1873 she took the same Tripos examination as the male students, having already gained a first at Part I, and was classed as the equivalent to Senior Optime in Mathematics
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Mathematical Tripos
The Mathematical Tripos
Tripos
is the mathematics course that is taught in the Faculty of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge. It is the oldest Tripos
Tripos
examined in Cambridge University.Contents1 Origin1.1 Influence 1.2 Early history 1.3 Wranglers and their coaches 1.4 Athletics 1.5 Women2 1909 reforms 3 Today 4 References 5 Further readingOrigin[edit] In its classical nineteenth-century form, the tripos was a distinctive written examination of undergraduate students of the University of Cambridge. Prior to 1824, the Mathematical Tripos
Tripos
was formally known as the "Senate House Examination".[1] From about 1780 to 1909, the "Old Tripos" was distinguished by a number of features, including the publication of an order of merit of successful candidates, and the difficulty of the mathematical problems set for solution
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The Huffington Post
HuffPost
HuffPost
(formerly The Huffington Post and sometimes abbreviated HuffPo)[2] is a liberal[3] American news and opinion website and blog that has both localized and international editions
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George V Of The United Kingdom
George V
George V
(George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was King of the United Kingdom
King of the United Kingdom
and the British Dominions, and Emperor of India, from 6 May 1910 until his death in 1936. Born during the reign of his grandmother Queen Victoria, George was third in the line of succession behind his father, Albert Edward, Prince of Wales, and his own elder brother, Prince Albert Victor. From 1877 to 1891, George served in the Royal Navy, until the unexpected death of his elder brother in early 1892 put him directly in line for the throne. On the death of his grandmother in 1901, George's father became King-Emperor
King-Emperor
of the British Empire
British Empire
as Edward VII, and George was created Prince of Wales. He succeeded his father in 1910
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Fayum Mummy Portraits
Mummy
Mummy
portraits or Fayum mummy portraits
Fayum mummy portraits
(also Faiyum
Faiyum
mummy portraits) is the modern term given to a type of naturalistic painted portrait on wooden boards attached to Egyptian mummies from the Coptic period. They belong to the tradition of panel painting, one of the most highly regarded forms of art in the Classical world. In fact, the Fayum portraits are the only large body of art from that tradition to have survived. Mummy
Mummy
portraits have been found across Egypt, but are most common in the Faiyum
Faiyum
Basin, particularly from Hawara
Hawara
in the Fayum Basin (hence the common name) and the Hadrianic Roman city Antinoopolis. "Faiyum Portraits" is generally thought of as a stylistic, rather than a geographic, description
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